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Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Page 4
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 4. April 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4467.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4467

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-04 - Page 4, April 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4490/show/4467.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-04
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_559d.jpg
Transcript L^V HOUSTON! ff | |B)ieawiwujw I saw three bumper stickers on the same bumper one Tuesday. One was a tattered, black and white, Kathy Whitmire for Controller, circa 1977, another was a newer-looking blue and gold Eleanor Tinsley for City Council from the 1979 campaigns, and the one in the middle, sticking on for dear life, was a faded relic of the seventies: Clean up politics, elect women. The message took on a life of its own with Kathy Whitmire's election and emergence as a defender of Houston's public trust. With a proper sense of moral outrage and irreverence, the city controller continually challenges the mayor, the council, and department heads and, if they still try to get away with it, she exposes them in the press. Her books are clean. Eleanor Tinsley brings a similar kind of intelligence and conscience to city government. She does her homework and is respectfully referred to as a "League-of- Women-Voters type." She is also savvy about the media and last month, after getting her facts and figures together about the unequal employment profile of women in city government, she called a press conference. Veteran City Hall reporters couldn't recall any former councilman, including the 20-year incumbent she defeated last fall, ever calling a formal press conference—especially one reflecting poorly on the city. Tinsley, however, made no charges of discrimihation, she just made observations—"Our study indicates that in every category, even those where women are concentrated, men earn on the average more than women"—and she stuck to the hard facts that her research assistant and UH graduate student, Goldie Waghalter, uncovered in two months of intensive work. For the record, these bleak statistics serve to remind us that little, if anything, has changed in the last decade. Back in 1974, Merylyn Whited, first as a graduate intern in City Controller Leonel Castillo's office and later as his director of research and public information, was the first person to collect data on employment patterns from payroll information in the controller's office. She turned over her research to Poppy Northcutt, the city's first women's advocate. Both Northcutt (1975) and Nikki Van Hightower (1977), who replaced her, built on Whited's origi- BY JANICE BLUE nal data and made current employment information public. "It is incredible how consistent every report that comes out of there is. Nothing has changed from the time Poppy first did her report to mine to Eleanor's," said Van Hightower, now executive director of the Houston Area Women's Center. "We all come up with the same findings, the same problems, and say the same things, and nothing's happened." "I know change is slow," said Tinsley. "But we hope that by demanding accountability things will be speeded up." She is careful not to lay blame at this point. Both she and Waghalter are more apt to say the discrimination is unintentional and that affirmative action suffers from "benign neglect." They feel it's simply a low priority, administration after administration, because the excuse can be made that there are more pressing problems facing the city. A former member of the Affirmative Action Advisory Committee said: "Sure the mayor supports affirmative action. So does Jimmy Carter support the ERA. But it's a low priority with Iran, SALT talks, and his re-election campaign." City employees, on the other hand, are more critical of the administration and the "buddy system" they have to live with. But, as I learned in interview after interview, they only speak "off the record." They can't afford not to. Here are three views from the inside: "You have to say discrimination is condoned because it's gone on for so long. That or it's indifference, ignorance, poor management or just plain, dirty pool." "The department heads have a lot of power over whom they hire. There's a trade off going on all the time between civil service and department heads." "Jim [McConn] has fulfilled his boyhood dream of wanting to be mayor. Now, he wants to be one of the boys. He's not going to bring in one of the 30- year boys and tell him to find more women. That's not part of good-old-boy politics." We think it takes courage, frankly, to do what Tinsley is doing, because City Hall is not a very supportive environment and you don't get very many pats on the back for reminding people they're not complying with the law. And you surely don't score any political points from the old council. We were surprised to hear from Tins- ley that the mayor was "surprised" things were as bad as they were, that he thought other departments were doing as well as his own. After all, he's only appointed one woman city department head out of 26 and that was only after his purchasing director, Jack Key, was indicted. We're glad he's finding women for those $30,000-a-year executive assistant positions on the third floor, but what about the clerk typist in municipal courts taking home a bi-weekly $300, less than the monthly car allowance for his own council members? We read in Marge Crumbaker that the mayor is going to receive a humanitarian award from a cancer research group. We don't know what he's done for cancer, but he could take Tinsley's research to heart and probably win a humanitarian award from the city's clerical workers. April 1980 Vol 5, no. 3 ADVERTISING Beth Adam, Shirley Bryson, Ailene English CIRCULATION Missy Hauge, Debra Thornton, Rose Wright COPY EDITORS Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Rose Wright DESIGN David Crossley EDITORS Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, David Crossley OFFICE Janice Blue, Rose Wright PHOTOGRAPHERS Daniel Bissonnet. David Crossley, Nancy Dahlberg, Marguerite Johnston, Gary Allison Morey, Alma Newsom PRODUCTION Janice Blue, David Crossley, Janet Meyer, Kathleen Packlick, Rose Wright PROOFREADER Gabrielle Cosgriff RADIO SHOW Nancy Lane Fleming and Rita Saylors, Co-hosts on KPFT-FM and production staff: Blanca Balderas, Gertrude Barnstone, Michelle Batchelder, Leslie Conner, Jack Drake, Stella Fleming, Marge Glaser, Karen Saylors TAPE TRANSCRIBERS Rose Wright TYPESETTERS Virginia Myers, Lynne Mutchler Second-class postage paid at Houston,Texas. Houston Breakthrough USPS 413130. is published monthly (except for the bi-1 monthly issues of July/August and December /January) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004. Mailing address: P. 0. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions are $7 (one year), $13 (two years) and $18 (three years). Library and institutional rates are $15 (one year), $20 (two years) and $25 (three years). Newsstand and single copy rate is $1.00. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201. POSTMASTER- Send form 3579 to Houston Breakthrough, P. 0. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH