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Breakthrough, October 1978
Page 8
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Breakthrough, October 1978 - Page 8. October 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4332.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1978). Breakthrough, October 1978 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4332

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough, October 1978 - Page 8, October 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4332.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Breakthrough, October 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
File Name femin_201109_544f.jpg
Transcript Columna Rota (right) The Third Eye (below) "Frida Kahlo is the only example in the history of art of an artist who tore open her chest and heart to reveal the biological truth of her feelings.,, —Diego Rivera Transfiguration of pain by Anita Freeman Davidson N In Mexico Frida Kahlo became a popular public personality during her lifetime, and a cult figure with her death. Still, her work is not widely known. Hay den Herr era, whose well-researched article in Artforum (May, 1976) provided information for this article, is writing a monograph on Kahlo which will be published soon. Until this year, Kahlo's work had not been exhibited in the United States since 1938. A major retrospective of 45 paintings has been organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and will be on view in Houston from October 14 through November 19 at Sarah Campbell Blaffer Gallery, University of Houston. Frida Kahlo was 16 years old, bedridden by a near-fatal accident, and bored when she first began to paint. With a special easel installed across her bed so that she could paint while lying on her back, and a mirror attached to the cano py, she began by painting herself. During the 28 years that followed, Kahlo recorded with directness and painfully sharp insight the events of her life in a series of paintings that challenged the prevailing values of both the art world and society itself. Many of the events described on Kahlo's canvases were consequences of the 1925 accident. When the bus she was riding from school in Mexico City to her home in suburban Coyoacan collided with a streetcar, Kahlo's spine was factur- ed, her pelvis crushed, and her foot broken. She was confined to her bed for over a year. Until her death at 44, she was in and out of hospitals undergoing some 35 bone grafts and spinal fusions, several miscarriages, and at least three abortive Caesarean sections. Pain was a constant fact in Kahlo's life not only physically, but psychologically. Although her damaged pelvis prevented her from carrying a fetus to term, she tried repeatedly to fulfill her wish since adolescence to have a child by the flamboyant Mexican muralist, Diego Rivera, whom she married twice—once for pass- sion and once apparently Tor camara derie, having agreed to the second marri- riage only on the condition that they would not have sexual intercourse. Kahlo's first meeting with Rivera took place before her crippling accident. She would come to watch him paint at the Ministry of Education which was near the National Preparatory School where she was studying to become a medical student. The 13-year-old Frida differed from most girls her age in both appearance and conduct. She wore short hair, leather jackets, and covered her legs with denim pants to hide the effects of polio which had confined her to bed for most of her sixth year. She was outgoing and politically active in a left-wing clique at the preparatory school and in the Young Communist League-a political stance she shared with Rivera. As soon after her accident as she was able to walk, Kahlo took her first three paintings to Rivera. He admired the paintings and the painter. A fiery courtship led to their marriage in 1929. In his autobiography, Diego Rivera called Frida Kahlo "the most important fact in my life." Nevertheless, marriage to the egocentric Rivera was a continuing round of infi delities, battles, separations, and passionate reunions, all well-publicized. The traumas of her marriage are recorded in some of Kahlo's most fascinating works. The Two Fridas, 1939, is her first large canvas and was painted after the divorce. One Frida is dressed in a Tehuana skirt and blouse and the other in a white Victorian dress, reflecting Kahlo's dual heritage, European and Mexican Indian. Kahlo explained to American art historian McKimley Helm that one is the Frida that Diego had loved, and the other, the one in the white dress, is the "woman that Diego no longer loves." A year after their divorce, Kahlo and Rivera remarried. Self-Portrait With Cropped Hair, 1940, shows that the second time around was a lot like the first. When Kahlo caught Rivera with another woman in California, she threatened to cut off her hair if he left her. He left her and off came the long hair that Rivera loved and that Kahlo had made a ritual of dressing with flowers, ribbons and jewels. The painting takes its format from pulqueria murals-wallpaintings, often humorous, used to decorate bars selling pulque. At the top of the canvas the 8 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH OCTOBER