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Breakthrough, October 1978
Pages 6 and 7
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Breakthrough, October 1978 - Pages 6 and 7. October 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4331.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1978). Breakthrough, October 1978 - Pages 6 and 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4331

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough, October 1978 - Pages 6 and 7, October 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4331.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough, October 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location Call # HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 6 and 7
File name femin_201109_544e.jpg
Transcript ppMiMnin by Kathleen Williamson Kirsten Soderlind discovered both lier vocation and the women's movement at the University of Texas in Austin in 1975. After three and a half years of studying architecture, Soderlind, on an impulse, took an illustration course. "Illustration was wonderful," she says. "It was really what I wanted to be doing. I've never looked back." At about the same time Soderlind joined a women's discussion group. "It was great to be with people who had the same problems and ques tions that I did," she recalls. "I had always felt that if I wanted to do something, I could. It didn't matter that I was a woman. But suddenly I started bumping up against things and I realized that it does make a difference. That year Soderlind moved to Houston, where her study of women's issues led to another discovery. She heard feminist Yolanda Birdwell discuss her trip to China, and she wanted to know more about the ways the Chinese work to achieve good medical and child care. Soder lind joined the U.S.-China Peoples Friendship Association and went on their annual tour of China in 1976. She was impressed with the openness of the Chinese in discussing their problems. "The status of women is undergoing change," Soderlind explains. "Teaching is still done primarily by women, and men sometimes don't share all the housework. But the women and men we met were the first to admit that the situation still needs improving. "Every factory that we saw had a nursery. Before the trip, I thought you either had a career or a family, but not both. The Chinese showed me that it didn't have to be a contradiction. For thern, childraising is the responsibility of the whole community." The Chinese emphasis on working cooperatively for a common cause has become part of Soderlind's life. After her return, she and her companion of three years, Charles Long, decided to marry. As Soderlind explains, "We have similar goals. We can do things better together than ve could by ourselves." Having honed her skills working at a design studio, Soderlind began v orking full-time as an illustrator last fall. After selling a drawing to Texas Monthly (see John Connally above), her talents have been increasingly in demand. Her drawing of Maud Russell, editor of the Far East Reporter, appeared in the January, 1977 Breakthrough, With Larry McEntire and his Lone Star Studio, Soderlind has worked on two Texas Monthly covers. Her imaginative drawing of Houston feminist and city controller Kathy Whitmire will grace the cover of next month's City magazine. Her poster entry in the "American Women on the Move" contest, depicting scenes from women's struggle for equality in the U.S., won second place and now hangs in her husband's office. Though her commercial success has been gratifying, Soderlind most enjoys portraiture. Using pencil and airbrush, she combines photorealistic detail with fantasy, as in her self- portrait (see cover) or her drawing of a friend's child with zebras. The process of suiting the setting to the subject may take as long as 50 hours. "I talk to them to find out what their favorite thing is or how they want to be. Maybe something they remember as a child, something that makes them feel good." As for the future, Soderlind plans to return to China next year, this time as a tour leader. And she hopes "not to become rigid. In 50 years I still want to be open to new ideas." Illustration for Texas Monthly Portrait of the Soderlind sisters (above left) HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH OCTOBER OCTOBER HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH