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Breakthrough 1978-10
Page 5
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Breakthrough 1978-10 - Page 5. October 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1978). Breakthrough 1978-10 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4330

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1978-10 - Page 5, October 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4337/show/4330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Breakthrough 1978-10
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_544d.jpg
Transcript NEWS Why is this man smiling? Rape is a horrifying crime that affects thousands of women, both physically and mentally, each year. Rape can happen anytime, anywhere, to anyone. All women are potential victims of rape-. My office has prepared this booklet as a public service to women in Houston. I hope that it will make them more conscious that they could be raped so that they will guard against it. Also, because rape is traumatic, knowledge of what to ask for, where to go for help, and what can be expected will help rape victims to survive the trauma. Therefore, I hope you will read this booklet from cover to cover so that you do not become another rape victim. And if you are unfortunate enough to have been given this book because you have been raped, I hope it will help you to deal with the trauma and will point out the necessity of reporting the crime to the police so that your assailant can be caught, put behind bars and prevented from raping other women. Jim McConn, Mayor of the City of Houston Same old thins at the courthouse At his regular Wednesday press conference last week, Mayor' Jim McConn appointed Fad Wilson to a judgeship on the municipal bench. Wilson, a member of the Black Organization for Leadership Development became the ninth man and the second Black to be appointed to the bench. The Women's Political Caucus had endorsed Helen Cassidy to fill the vacant judgeship. Cassidy graduated magna cum laude from Bates School of Law in 1975, where she was named Outstanding Woman Law Student. While in school she was named to the Order of Barons, an honorary law society, and won a writing award for her law review comment. Active in the women's movement, Cassidy has been a member of the National Board of NOW and was instru mental in organizing and convening the Harris County Women's Political Caucus. With Wilson's appointment, Houston now has two black judges, one Chicano, and no women, out of a bench of nine. Percentages alone raise the question of why Houston has not had a woman judge since Anne Green's resignation and more pointedly, why McConn chose to perpetuate the all male bench with this recent appointment. Kathy Whitmire, city controller, has stressed to HCWPC members that McConn needs to hear from Houston women on this issue. If area feminists are not quick to respond to upcoming vacancies, Houston will continue to be saddled with an all-male municipal bench. Marianne Kostakis On July 26,1978, the Houston Post printed police department statistics showing that the number of rapes reported in Houston during the first six months of 1978 increased 33% over the same period in 1977, the largest jump in any crime category. To help women protect themselves against attack and provide support for women in the aftermath of rape, Marsha Wayne, Executive Assistant to the Mayor, has produced a free booklet titled How to Avoid or Cope with Rape, the first page of which is reproduced above. The project was funded by the Women's Services Department, First City National Bank, Hazel McKee, Manager.* The first chapter, written by Linda Cryer, Administrator of the Rape Treatment, Detection and Prevention Program of the City Health Department, provides useful, detailed suggestions for safety at home, in the car and in public places. (This information appeared in the December/January 1978 issue of Breakthrough.) Also included are methods of foiling a rapist in face-to-face confrontation. The second section, prepared by Lt. Larry Earls of the Rape Squad and Vic Driscoll of the District Attorney's office, describes current procedures of the police, hospitals, and the District Attorney's office in investigating a rape. Wayne credited the Los Angeles County Commission on the Status of Women and their book, Rape Crisis; Your Rights, with inspiring her project. "The chapter on the emotional reaction to rape was transcribed verbatim from their wonderful booklet," she said. Every woman fears that she will become "another rape victim," as Mayor Jim McConn puts it in his introduction. But reading this booklet "from cover to cover" as McConn suggests is not enough to guarantee that no attack will occur. McConn's statement implies that reducing * the incidence of rape depends entirely on the actions of the women threatened by it. According to a study by the U.S. Justice Department's Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, the rape rate for Houston in 1977 was 53.2 for each 100,000 of the general population. Since only half of the general population are women and thus targets for rape, the effective incidence of rape is twice as high. The projected rape rate for 1981 is 61 per 100,000 or 122 per 100,000 women. The LEAA study states that this rate can be reduced by "better collection of evidence by police, increased prosecution efforts and public education and rape prevention programs." How to Avoid or Cope with Rape is a worthy effort, but the Mayor's office and the law enforcement officials must do more than inform the victims for the rape crisis in Houston to end. Kathleen Williamson ♦Copies of the booklet are available free of charge by calling 222-3141 or writing to the Mayor's Office, P.O. Box 1562, Houston, Texas 77001. ERA extension passes; Texas Senators fail With the Senate's 60-36 vote in favor of extending the deadline for ratification of the ERA, Congress completed a landmark action and breathed new life into the Equal Rights Amendment. The October 6 vote gives ERA supporters a 39-month extension from March 1979 to secure ratification of the amendment. Two days earlier the Senate voted down a proposal 54-44 to offer states that have already voted for ratification an opportunity to rescind their vote at a later date. To the dismay of anti-ERA groups such as Phyllis Schlafly's organization "Stop ERA", ERA proponents now have until June 30, 1982 to ensure the amendment's enactment into law. A disgruntled Schlafly called the extension •tf "fraud" in a news conference, and threatened to fight it all the way to the Supreme Court. Texas legislators' contributions to the ERA victory were mixed. Both Tower and Bentsen voted for the resicission proposal in the October 4 Senate vote. Two days later, Bentsen voted for the ERA extension, while Tower was one of four Senators absent during the extension vote. With the legislative barriers behind, ERA supporters are now preparing to meet the difficult task of securing three more states' ratification of the amendment. Congressional support has given impetus to the ERA movement. What remains is to preserve and accelerate this new momentum for the work that lies ahead. Marianne Kostakis OCTOBER HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH