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Houston Breakthrough 1976-06 - 1976-07
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Houston Breakthrough 1976-06 - 1976-07 - Page 1. June 1976 - July 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4191.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1976 - July 1976). Houston Breakthrough 1976-06 - 1976-07 - Page 1. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4191

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1976-06 - 1976-07 - Page 1, June 1976 - July 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4211/show/4191.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1976-06 - 1976-07
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1976 - July 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_518a.jpg
Transcript Vol.1, No. 6 JUNE-JULY 1976 50* Women's Advocate named by Gay Cosgriff Houston's new Women's Advocate, Dr. Nikki Van Hightower, sees herself as just that -- an advocate for all the women of Houston. Most of her energies will be directed towards getting women who are employed by the city into decision-making positions, and promoting qualified women within their departments. "I think if you saw the way jobs are sex-segregated in City Hall," Van Hightower says, "you would see that women are automatically put into the lower status, clerical kinds of jobs." Van Hightower, formerly an assistant professor in political science at the University of Houston, was appointed last month by Mayor Fred Hofheinz to fill the office which had been vacant for seven months. Since the City of Houston is currently experiencing a hiring freeze, she will concentrate on the area of promotion. "I plan to monitor an affirmative action program for city employees, which will include instituting training programs and a merit system for promotion," Van Hightower said. Although the Civil Service Department officially has authority in hiring and promotion, ir\ practice each department head has tremendous autonomy, which is why Van Hightower feels that a merit system is essential to ensure promotion of qualified women. There is no female equivalent of the 'good-old-boy' club. "I believe that without an outside, objective criterion for hiring and promotion, women are stifled in their desire to advance themselves," she says. In the short time she has been in office, Van Hightower has received a number of calls from women employed by the city who feel that hard work and dedication do not win them the promotions they deserve- rather, they are penalized for being 'aggressive'. "Women still are clearly stereotyped in terms of what jobs they hold," she states. Since her appointment, Van Hightower has been spending most of her time dealing with the media and organizing her office. She plans to contact all the city department heads and the members of the city council and make herself known to them. She is apparently already known to two or three of them. Council member Homer Ford stated, "I see the office of Women's Advocate as an overlapping of services provided by others in the affirmative action office and civil service." 'The city has been doing a good job of hiring women," said Council member Louis Macey. "A Women's Advocate is not any more necessary than a man's advocate," believes Council member Frank Mancuso. "It is a waste of taxpayers' money and I see no need for it." Van Hightower replied, "Men already have advocates—they are well represented in all the highest levels of city government. They do not have the problem of under-representation that women have." Van Hightower is emphatic in saying that she sees herself as being instrumental in raising the consciousness of city officials. "Consciousness raising with city department heads will be part of my job." The office of the Women's Advocate is part of the Affirmative Action Department, and Van Hightower has no staff or secretary of her own. She shares the services of the Affirmative Action's clerical staff and sees 0> •o < DR. NIKKI VAN HIGHTOWER no possibility of the city providing her with her own staff in the future. At present there is no listing for 'Women's Advocate' in the city directory. Van Hightower says she will try to rectify this. Another top priority for Van Hightower is to develop a program of child care for city employees. This area was included in a four-point feminist platform Continues on page 16 Nurses organize efforts by Janice Blue "I cannot for the life of me, as a politician, understand how a profession as large as yours, with as much know/edge and skills, has so little political power. "You have the power in numbers . . . You are 10:1 in number over doctors. You have the skills and training .... PLEASE start to use your political muscle to help this country." Daniel K. Inouye U.S. Senator (D-Hawaii) ROZANNE THATCHER, graduate nursing student at UT-Austin and chairperson of the statewide Save Our School (SOS) organization, addresses nursing students, faculty, and supporters in Austin, May 14, following the UT Regents' refusal to reconsider its March 26 decision to abolish The University of Texas' System School of Nursing. 98% of nurses are women. 95% of doctors are men. Until the swift and sudden injustice abolishing the University of Texas System School of Nursing by the Board of Re- gents-and with the apparent sanction of the Texas Medical Association—the struggle for professional dominance of doctors over nurses took place, overtly or covertly, in hospital wings or physicians' offices. Today, thanks to the Board of Regents and the TMA, the battle is out in the open. . . en route to the courts and the legislature. "Nurses are tired of being acted upon rather than acting on," said Dr. Evelyn Redding, faculty member at UT-Houston. "The regents may not know it yet, but their actions have politicized nurses across the state. After the regents failed (May 14) to reconsider a second plea by the state-wide nursing community to reverse their March 26 decision dissolving and decentralizing the UTSSN (See Regents Scalpel Nurses, Breakthrough, April 1976), the Texas Nurses Association, in an histor- 14 women raped Fourteen area women, ages 17-29, have been victims of rape in recent months by a man who is being referred to as the "Memorial City" or "Beer Belly" rapist. Three of the women were abducted from the Memorial City Shopping Center. The rapist operates around shopping centers and apartment complexes. He generally tampers with a woman's car and then renders aid when she is unable to start it. Detective Patricia Fawkes in the homicide bureau of the Houston Police Department said the rapist then tells his intended victims that because he stopped to help them, he is late for an appointment and he asks that they drive him to his meeting. After entering their cars, he pulls a gun and directs them to drive to what becomes the scene of the rape. The rapist generally has a sloppy appearance, wearing his shirt out and wearing some kind of hat (baseball or fishing hat). It is believed he hides a stocking under the cap which he pulls over his face during the attack. Detective Fawkes advised area women to ask security guards for assistance with their automobiles if they have car trouble in shopping centers or apartment areas. The rapist is believed to be in his late 20's or early 30's, with brown hair, of stocky build and under six feet tall. Houston women detectives are working on the case around the clock. Because of the media attention given the case in late May, the "Beer Belly" rapist has been under cover since May 20. ic act, filed suit.against the regents in 53rd district court. "The Texas Nurses Association has chosen the only alternative left to professional nurses— the justice of the courts," read Opal Stewart, president of the Texas Nurses Association, a state affiliate of the American Nurses Association, the largest professional organization for registered nurses in the country. Continues on page 20