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Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977
Page 33
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Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977 - Page 33. November 18, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 29, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977 - Page 33. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4150

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977 - Page 33, November 18, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 29, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 18, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 33
File Name femin_201109_533bf.jpg
Transcript (Continued from page 1) Suffragist V brothers to elect a representative to A the legislature, although a majority of those brothers voted against WL woman's enfranchisement." ■8r But for all the outcry in the W South, black males could not take f advantage of their voting rights. Poll taxes, white primaries, private clubs and terrorism effectively kept Southern blacks from voting. Adair was involved in community activities in Kingsville, Texas, where she and her husband lived. The white suffragists in Kingsville wanted her to get other black women who worked as domestics to ask their white employers to sign petitions supporting the 19th Amendment. "Other Negro women and I helped them get these petitions signed, and we did win," Adair said. "Well, these same Negro women went to the polls to vote, and we come to find out that we couldn't vote because we were Negroes. Then we fought with that. "Oh, I was hurt ... to think that I had worked so hard to make it possible for women to vote and I was a woman and I couldn't vote. We had no rights, and we couldn't demand anything." Also active in the liberal Harris County Democrats here, Adair still recalls the day she became a Democrat. "Up until around 1900, all Negroes were Republicans because Abraham Lincoln was a Republican. Around 1920, I personally made a change," she said. "Warren G. Harding was running for president. My husband was a brakeman oi the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Being a senior brakeman, he would always bring special trains to our section. One day he called me long distance and told me that along the road, the school children were meeting the campaign train of Harding and shaking hands with him. He said the train would stop in Kingsville. "I asked to take 10 or 12 children with parents' consent to see the candidate," Adair said. "I knew exactly where- the train would stop. I selected the spot and placed my children. When my husband opened the observation gate, my children were standing in front of it where Harding had to step out. "When he stepped out, he reached over my children and shook the white children's hands. I became upset and decided at that moment I would become a Democrat." In 1925, Adair moved to Houston, where she became active in trie city's newly formed chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). She became its first executive director and continued to agitate for blacks' right to vote. "Some of the Negro men tried to get me out of the job," Adair remembers. "But I was always more afraid for the Negro men. I could get away with more. "Many nights I didn't sleep, wondering what they (whites) might do to me. I never had a gun in this house, but they thought I did. I did a lot of big talking." Blacks in Texas actually got the vote when a long and controversial suit brought by a black Houston dentist resulted in the abolishment of the white primary and the Texas political party structure. Christia Adair was one of the first black women in Texas to vote—the year was 1948. But her efforts did not stop then. She continued to battle the petty Jim Crow laws—the segregated restrooms and lunch counters, the rules against blacks trying on clothes in stores' dressing rooms. The McCarthy era was particularly hard. In 1956, the state attorney general A BIG TEXAS WELCOME FROM KHTV. SYLVIA BENNETT/Public Service Director GLORIA GARZA/Film Director ON OUR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Sherry Bell Mary Brooks Debbie Clark Pat Claussen Billie Goldman Shirley Harris Debra Haslam Polly Lawrence Angel Provost Freida Reeves Virgie Robinson Millie Rosales Cynthia Spence Jodie Tribble Lottie Williams ON OUR PRODUCTION STAFF Clai Ashton Terri Carter Kathi Hayden Jane Patrick Carolyn Porter Judith Ramos ON OUR ENGINEERING STAFF Billie Jean Vowell ON OUR NEWS STAFF Hilda Gentry Mary K. Issacs Maria Morin Nancy Paul Jo Anne Vallie Rush Clarese Studevant Sylvia Thompson Marijane Vandivier ON OUR SALES STAFF Tina Lenet Pat Waggener IEhtv) IHOUSTON accused the NAACP of barratry, soliciting cases for lawyers, and tried to get its membership roster. Adair conveniently lost the list, and Roy Wilkins, backed her up with equally bad record keeping in the national NAACP office. Even at 84, the struggle for equality and justice is not over for Christia Adair. "As long as there is something to be done, I don't feel like I'm too old to do CHRISTIA ADAIR now open.... another woman owned -m ,<£&* &* 10 Am tii 6 pm TUES. THRU SAT. 3201 HILLCROFT ot Richmond /uite230...up/tair/ REASONABLE RATES 783-3593 PAGE 32 NOVEMBER 18, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH catalyst The national, nonprofit organization that helps women choose, launch and advance their careers by providing: * Information and library service * Network of 150 counseling centers nationwide * 50 Career publications for women * Resume preparation manual Visit us at Booth 222 Write or call for free list of publications Catalyst 14 East 60th Street New York, N.Y. 10022 (212)759-9700