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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Page 32
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 32. November 18, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4149.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 32. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4149

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 32, November 18, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4149.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 18, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 32
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_533be.jpg
Transcript OR HOW TO AVOID 1HE • i • priced drinks and a good view of the city. On the plaza in front of the Central Public Library (corner of Bagby and Mc- Kinney) stands Claes Oldenburg's Geometric Mouse. A few years back, an anonymous donor offered the piece to the city, whereupon City Council demonstrated that it is not only gynephobic and homophobic, but esthetophobic as well by declining the gift. Local art people began an intensive lobbying effort which eventually changed Council's collective mind. After the new vote, one councilmember, a former major league ballplayer, observed, "Those folks convinced me that Oldenburg is a real pro, and that's what Houston needs more of." Inside the library is an exhibit about women architects. Architecturally, history hardly began here until 1900; but just across the street from the library, in Sam Houston Park, the city has carefully preserved a half dozen 19th century houses in various styles. If you go there, you will be struck again by how clean we make our history around here. Hovering in the background of the park we have a fine old chunk of 19th century monumentality: a large, naked, winged male figure known locally as (what else?) the Spirit of the Confederacy. To get away from the madcap com- merciality of downtown try Buffalo Bayou Park, a green strip some two miles long which starts just west of Sam Houston Park. Also, in front of City Hall, at the corner of Smith and Walker, you will find Martha Hermann Square Park, a popular luncheon spot. George Hermann donated the land to the city in 1910, with the stipulation that anyone who wished to do so should be allowed to spend the night in the park, undisturbed by the police. But ingenious officials got around that by installing a sprinkler system. City Hall is also the site of the recent battle royal between Mayor Fred Hofheinz and City Council concerning the city office of Women's Advocate. One of Hof- Downtown Library heinz's early achievements following his election in 1973 was to create the position of Women's Advocate, fulfilling a promise he had made to the Harris County Women's Political Caucus. Poppy Northcutt served as advocate for two years. Her successor is Nikki Van Hightower. Houston's Oldenburg's Geometric Mouse in front of the Central Public Library Other downtown points of interest: The Antioch Baptist Church (corner of Robin and Shaw, two blocks west of the Hyatt), Houston's oldest black church, dating from 1874. Christ Church Cathedral (corner of Fannin and Texas), the oldest church in town (1839). Houston Center (corner of Fannin and Walker)-the beginnings are already up of this massive example of compensatory urban reflex. It is a futuristic complex of high-rises apparently designed to show the Rockefellers how it should be done. La Carafe (813 Congress), the oldest surviving Houston building, now a bar. South of downtown you will find the Rothko Chapel with Mark Rothko's last paintings, a series of enormous, somber canvases. Located at the corner of Sul Ross and Yupon, the chapel is open daily from noon to eight and provides an extraordinary place of peace and solitude to escape the confusion of the city. In front of the chapel you will see Barnet Newman's Broken Obelisk. You might as well drop in at Neiman- Marcus (corner of Post Oak and Westheimer) and stroll into the adjacent shopping center, the Galleria. The best thing that N-M does is gift-wrap. The best way to approach the Galleria is to see it as a giant, four-level-mall-with-ice-rink, air conditioned gift-wrap. For what it's worth, it was inspired by the 19th century mall of the same name in Milan. For a fast trip into the bizarrely quaint, you might try walking through the Rice University (6100 South Main) campus. The style of the original buildings (dating from the teens of this century) TOUR GRAY LINE > ~\ FABULOUS HOUSTON... The easy way! EXCITING TOURS 7 1 Houston in brief 2 Houston and Astrodome 3 NASA—LBJ Space Center 4 Galveston Isle 5 Historic San Jacinto Battleground, Port of Houston 6 Evening Shopping Tour 7 Evening Escapade— Night life tour of Houston contact your Hotel Bell Captain for tickets and reservations IN APPRECIATION OF JUST A FEW OF THE WOMEN WHO HA VE HAD A DEEP PERSONAL IMPACT ON OUR DE VELOPMENT. IF YOU COULD KNOW THEM AS WE HAVE, YOUR LIVES WOULD BE GREATLY ENRICHED. Gertrude Barnstone Dorothy Day Dorothy Hood Anne Lower Ann Wharton B. J. Walker Billie Can Toni Scala Dr. Carol Weiner T^IAjd^ ^y^2iu^ Mjd^Mfi™**^ ron waters State Representative JUDY ELDERS Admin. Aide DEBRA DANBURG Admin. Aide Houston Skyline own Anita Bryant, one Geneva Kirk Brooks, in union with various other minds around the city, a few months ago convinced the all-male Council that Van High- tower should go. The Council went so far as to abolish the position of Women's Advocate, whereupon the mayor promptly re-appointed Van Hightower as Affirmative Action Specialist in the mayor's office, so that she could continue the work she had begun. In 1972 the old Rice Hotel (corner of Main and Texas) was the site of trr fL*i national women's political convention since Seneca Falls. One may savor the neat historical irony in the fact that that event occurred on the very spot where stood the first capital of the Republic of Texas, an entity which was surely one of your more rabidly patriarchal political undertakings of recent centuries. might most discreetly be referred to as extravagantly "Mediterranean." Rice, a rich, private institution of peculiar sexual orientation (one female for each two males), exists here instead of New Jersey because, surprisingly, Texas 19th century law was less sexist than New York law of the same period. Difficult to find but worth the effort is Bayou Bend (at No. 1 Westcott), the mansion of the Hogg family. Jim Hogg was a governor of Texas in the 1920s. His daughter named (believe it or not) Ima Hogg, who died only recently, was one of Houston's outstanding patrons of the arts. In the visual arts, her primary gift to the city was the family home, filled with room after room of period furnishings of the last three centuries. (Continued on page 34) DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 18, 1977 PAGE 31