Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Page 31
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 31. November 18, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4148.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 31. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4148

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 31, November 18, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4148.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 18, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 31
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_533bd.jpg
Transcript VJNKING TOUR by Doug Milburn Vittoria Alliata, an Italian Marxist writer, came to Houston and saw an "archipelago of monads" which seemed to her a dumping ground of capitalism. The artist Christo wanted to build a block-square pyramid of oil drums 400-feet high downtown. Architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable got beneath the obvious but superficial similarities to Los Angeles and concluded that the city was unique. Billy Graham concluded that Houston is "more sinful than Hollywood." Painter Dorothy Hood perceives here a rare focus of powerful creative energies. Whatever Houston is, it drives visitors to superlatives, either positive or negative. With its extremes of growth and decay, urban sprawl and inner-city congestion, Houston seems to function as a sort of universal mirror, offering the visitor an accurate reflection of whatever sensitivities and prejudices that visitor carries about. One senses that it is a basic error to say that Houston is anything, because what Houston is, is what it will be tomorrow, and what Houston is tomorrow is what Houston will be the day after that. Much of the change is exploitative and rapinely commercial, in the grand human tradition, and much of it is probably sinful (though not in the sense Graham intended). But some of the change is just as surely the change that accompanies creative growth. Call it an adolescent, pubescent city. For a comparable period of rapid creative change, one might with profit compare Venice at the time of its flowering into what we know as Venice today. The Los Angeles surface is there,- and it is real. It is easy for the casual visitor to see nothing but that. But unlike Los Angeles, which has become its own best parody, Houston is such a young city that it is still developing its personality. Consider three basic facts. 1. Houston has no zoning laws. "Neighborhood integrity" exists in many parts of town only to the extent that you can so expand your moral and aesthetic sense in order to see its unity. In one small area (1200 block of W. Alabama) there is a 60-year-old neo-classic mansion, a Philip Johnson International-style quadrangle, an Australian art gallery (formerly a Conoco Station), a "U-Totem-m" drive-in grocery, Sister Roberts' Palm Reading Parlor, Studz Adult Newsstand and a little boutique specializing in aids for the sexually insecure. At worst, the result is an urban mess such as Angelinos have rarely aspired to. At best, the result is a city of continuing surprises. Example: one morning recently, people in the Montrose area awoke to find that a well-known patron of the arts, Domenique de Menil, had scattered six large Tony Smith sculptures on various lots she owns around the neighborhood. 2. Houston is a major seaport, third largest, behind New York and New Orleans. Fifty miles from the ocean and a seaport? It happened like this: In 1900, Galveston was the largest and fastest growing city in Texas. It seemed headed toward the Texas version of Manhattan Island. That vision ended with the Great Storm of 1900, a hurricane which submerged the entire island and killed 8,000 people. Given the abundance of mineral and agricultural resources in the state, Texas needed a major port, but obviously it somehow had to be safe from the direct power of Gulf hurricanes. What to do. Well, you move inland from Galveston by converting little Buffalo Bayou into a ship channel. The channel opened in 1916 and brings ocean-going vessels to within a mile of downtown Houston. (Buffalo Bayou, by the way, is the tiny stream just north of PAGE 30 NOVEMBER 18, 1977 Pennzoil Place: architect, Philip Johnson the Convention Center. 3. Houston has three large vocal minority communities in addition to the powerful feminist organizations here: black, chicano and gay. The white, male establishment is still very much in control of the city on many levels;but the movement of growth and change is already well- started. Now, the sights. If you really want to know about the Astrodome, the Space Center, etc., drop by the Chamber of Commerce in the 1100 Milam Building-they have plenty of that sort of information. For cultural starters, you might drop in at the Alley Theatre (corner of Milam and Louisiana), where, during the conference you will find a juried show of art by Houston women. The theater itself is a local legend: 30 years ago Nina Vance rented an abandoned fan factory in Montrose and started a theater which eventually became Houston's first equity house. By the early 60s Vance's high standards had made the Alley a Houston institution with a national reputation. Local money combined with Ford Foundation funds created the new Alley, which is actually two theaters, one a large stage, the other a duplicate of the small, in-the-round arena where Vance originally brought her theatrical vision to life. Diagonally across from the Alley stands Jones Hall (corner of Texas and Louisiana), the over-booked center of symphonic, operatic and balletic activity in town. Step inside for a look at Richard Lippold's magnificent sculpture, Gemini 2, suspended from the ceiling of the lobby. Philip Johnson designed the two black, skewed monoliths called Pennzoil Place (corner of Rusk and Louisiana-as if you could miss them). Then there's One Shell Plaza-the largest poured concrete structure in the world covered with who knows how many tons of travertine. Close study of the exterior of the Shell building DAILY BREAKTHROUGH OF HOUSTON; reveals rather subtle curvatures, both vertical and horizontal, in what a first glance seems to be just another rectilinear phallus. Check out one of the elevators, which collectively form a tragic little joke. Some designer stipulated that the elevators should be lined in unseamed leather. Because of the size of the cubicles, a worldwide search was undertaken to find cattle large enough to provide hides for the elevator walls. We understand that what you see is pretty much all that's left of a certain herd of unusually large Belgian bo vines. While you're in the Shell building, you might want to descend into the Tunnel System. Strangely, downtown Houston rests on a honeycomb of shiny new plastic- walled, orlon-carpeted tunnels. Reason: Stan Musial once observed that Houston has three seasons—summer, followed by July, and then August. Of course occasional northers do find their way this far south. But most of the time the weather does range between balmy sub-tropical and total steam-bath. What could Houston's affluent downtown air conditioning addicts do but go underground and build tunnels connecting all their new buildings with their new parking garages? If you can manage to see the whole complex as some kind of weird, antiseptic, capitalist toy, the tunnels and gj associated buildings are fun to wander > about in. (There are lots of your typical 5 ultra-special-purpose boutiques in the tun- ^ nels-for example, The Hang Ten Nails, 3 a shop specializing in pedicures for surf- > ers—that sort of thing). 2 The Hyatt Regency Hotel (corner of "» Dallas and Louisiana) has a 30-story lobby and a revolving restaurant with reasonably WATCH WHAT HAPPENS WHEN DETERMINED WOMEN GETT0GETHER. There's sure to be plenty happening at the National Women's Conference, and you're not going to want to miss any of it. But you can't be everywhere at once. We can. Sara Lowrey, Maria Sanchez and Sharon Speer of KPRC-TV will be on the floor every day. Then, they'll give you a complete look at what's been happening every evening on our 6:00 P. M. newscast. At 9:00 A.M. on Friday, November 18, we'll present a one-hour special called "Are You Listening?" hosted by Martha Stuart. Add to that the Big 2 News Conference, where well interview one of the more important delegates, and you'll see Channel 2 is the best place to get an overview of what's going on. After the day's sessions, settle down for a while. Turn on 2. Watch what happened. Then get ready for tomorrow. WATCH SARA LOWREY, MARIA SANCHEZ AND SHARON SPEER, KPRC-TV NEWSPERSONS, WITH FULL CONVENTION COVERAGE ON BIG 2 NEWS AT 6. 2*