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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Page 10
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 10. November 18, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4128.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4128

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 10, November 18, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4128.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 18, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_533aj.jpg
Transcript ISSISSIPPI By Claudia Feldman "Why do you always call me?" demanded Dallas Higgins, one of the 20 white delegates representing the state of Mississippi at the National Women's Conference. "Is it because of my husband's affiliation with the Klan?" "What are you really getting at?" asked Shelton N. Hand, one of the three members of the Mississippi delegation who criticized the state meetings and the national conference at a Senate hearing conducted by Senator Jesse Helms. "The media is pro-ERA." "We're not coming to Houston to disrupt the conference," Eddie Myrtle Moore said. "We're just asking that our story be told." The story is that 1200 participants at Mississippi's state convention elected five men and 15 women to the national convention who are opposed to the ERA, against abortions, highly critical of the convention's leadership and uniformly pessimistic about their chances of a fair hearing in Houston. All the delegates, that is, but one. Minutes after the newly elected delegates were announced, the lone black woman chosen to represent the state whose population is 38.6 per cent black, resigned. The ex-delegate, Willie Taylor, also publicity chairperson of the state's International Women's Year coordinating committee, claimed ill health. The rest of the Mississippi delegation says pro-ERA women forced her to resign. Others say, however, that she chose not to be associated with the overwhelmingly conservative group. Taylor could not be reached for comment. Before the state conference convened in July, national IWY leaders instructed the participants to elect delegates who were "low-income women; members of diverse racial, ethnic and religious groups; and women of all ages." After the state conference, IWY leaders claimed the women had been controlled by conservative groups including the John Birch Society, the Mormon Church and the Ku Klux Klan. Eddie Moore, 51, says those comments are "slurs at me as the delegation chairman and a discredit to the delegation. "The conference was not controlled by any group. We were all instructed to elect 20 delegates—and the 61 delegates we chose from were not listed by race or political affiliation," Moore said. "If there had been quotas, it wouldn't have been a free election." Also criticized frequently for including five men in the state delegation, Moore said, "People have harped on that. The men are not running the delegation. They are here at our own invitation." Moore said the only organized attempt to get a slate of conservative delegates was an informal one, "where we got on the phone to bring out our friends and neighbors." Are all the elected delegates Chris tians? "Yes ma'am," she said. "Christians have been silent too long. It's time we took a stand." Moore said the women's movement has been taken over by "radical women feminists" who are trying to destroy the American home. Moore is a homemaker, a mother, a grandmother, a woman who says she has dedicated her life to her family, the PTA, her church. She got involved in the convention, she says, because it was "time to take a stand on the issue." She was highly critical of the conduct of some at the state meeting. "The people we were working with had a lack of respect for God. The meetings didn't begin with a prayer, and the pledge of allegiance was said only when one of our men got a flag and marched down the aisle of one of the meeting rooms." Moore said she is looking forward to the trip to Houston. But, she said, there is little hope that her opinions will be heard. "The convention is already controlled" by pro-ERA forces, she said. Shelton Hand, 37, a Jackson attorney, agrees with Moore. "My goals at the convention are to survive. The organizers just want people to come in and put a rubber stamp on the report. Then they will take it back to Washington and say it represents a grass roots effort. But I dare say it won't represent American women." Hand said he is a member of the delegation because a large number of women asked him to run. "The people at the convention were Baptists, Presbyterians, Methodists, Mormons—all denominations. There have been statements that the group is Klan controlled. That just goes to show they've never been down here to talk to any of us." The women running the convention, he said, are "totally ruining the Christian- based fiber on which everything worthwhile in this country is based. "An extremely small, extremely loud minority." Hand said passage of the ERA would mean that women will be drafted and that Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, fraternities and sororities, mother-daughter and father- son events will become illegal. And lesbian and homosexual marriages, he said, will become commonplace if the ERA becomes law. "But I can't get anybody in the media to face up to it because all of them (reporters) are pro-ERA." Higgins, wife of Klan leader George Higgins, says she, too, was asked to run as a member of the delegation. But what she wants to accomplish in Houston, she said, is almost irrelevant. The way the convention has been run thus far, she said, allows only a slight chance her views will be heard. Higgins said she is not a member of the Klan but supports her husband's political beliefs. The real issue to be debated at the convention, she said, is whether "people are for the family or against the family." Higgins said she is against homosexuality ("they can call it an alternative lifestyle, but a sin is a sin"), abortions and increased credit for women ("there's too much credit in this country already"). Women, she said, represent the majority of voters in the country and the majority of wealth. "How can they say they are discriminated against? They have more rights than men do." The convention, she said, is supposed to represent "the grass roots. In reality, the convention is just going to jam certain ideas down our throats." Jessie Mosley, the chairperson of the state coordinating committee formed long before the state convention was held, is in sharp disagreement with the elected delegates. "They don't want equal rights," said Mosley who is in her early 60's. "They misunderstand the issues and only want to protect the status quo. They think a woman's place is in the home." She said she overheard one man say he was a delegate to "protect the women." Mosley acknowledged that one black had been elected at the state convention. "But she resigned because she didn't want to be a part of the group," she said. The group was elected at the state convention, Mosley said, because "they (the antis) outnumbered us." At least 500 to 600 of them organized and traveled from state to state, in Florida, Oklahoma, Utah, Hawaii and Arizona, telling the people what papers to follow, how to act and what to do. The national IWY commission expressed displeasure over the outcome of some state elections—specifically those in Mississippi and Alabama-that resulted in unrepresentative delegations. In March, the Commission named Mosley and eight other black women from Mississippi to attend the convention as at- large delegates. The Susan B. Anthony Gavel Given to the driving force who helped create the first International Council of Women in 1888, it honors those early advocates of women's rights who took the movement out of the kitchen and onto the streets. Now you can honor that spirit with this handsome repfoduo | tion of Ms. Anthony's original, f now in the Smithsonian Institution. Carefully crafted by Stieff in rosewood, sterling and an ecologically acceptable substitute for the original ivory, the inscribed faces mark the occasion and admonish the user to note that " Order is Heaven's first Law." And the wide sterling band, marked with both the Smithsonian and StiefF hallmarks, is perfect for engraving. Price: $37.50 gift box included £ The Susan B. Anthony Gavel Part of the Smithsonian Series by StiefT. Available at Foley's Depaj-tment Store Regal Touch All Stores 458 Greenspoints Mall Corrigan Jewelers All Stores The StiefT Company, 800 Wyman Park Drive, Baltimore, Maryland 21211. DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 18, 1977 PAGE 9