Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Page 9
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 9. November 18, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4127

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 9, November 18, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 18, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_533ai.jpg
Transcript Counterclockwise; SHARI GROSS, NANCY ANDERSON, CARA PETER, DORCAS ROCK, DOROTHY JONES, DOVE KULL Alaska's 596,000 square miles of land proved to be no problem for the women from Barrow to Sitka, and everywhere in between, who attended the state IWY women's meeting last May in Anchorage. Traveling across Alaska is nothing like traveling across Connecticut, or Guam or even Texas. The distance from Barrow to Anchorage is more than 700 miles. tance of their differences and the delegation itself is a balanced representation of Alaska's population—one of the major precepts of the IWY state meeting guidelines. While there seem to be few effective pressure groups in Alaska, there is a commitment to the rights of the individual in the land of rugged individualists. "Although I have my own feelings Cilft/ko By Suzanne Iudicello and Cheryl Knott Anchorage is nearly 600 miles from Sitka. Alaskans take the plane, not the bus or the car. Yet more than 700 Alaska women made the pilgrimage to the conference. For many, the women's meeting was a first attempt at political activity. While Alaska's vast land mass is no boon for travelers, it tends to feed the state's diversity. The concerns of Alaska's urban areas are as different from those of rural locales as the days of midnight sun are from the nights of winter darkness. On one hand, urban dwellers face the problems of employment, housing and boom-town growth. Cara Peters, a delegate from Fairbanks, and an activist for nontraditional jobs and support systems, says that rapid growth presents new opportunities, as well as new problems, for Alaska women. "If women are going to work on the pipeline, we can't just advocate day care from 9 to 5," Peters pointed out. "We've got to think about long-term child care for the woman who wants a chance at making big construction money." On the other hand, rural areas have their own problems. Subsistence hunting is still very much a part of life in Alaska. Conservationists' efforts to lock up federal lands will affect the women who live by subsistence hunting. "Without the land and the ability to hunt and fish, people cannot continue in their accustomed lifestyles," Rosita Worl, a delegate from Barrow, explained. "A woman's role in the subsistence lifestyle is lost if access to the land is lost." It is Alaska's version of the displaced homemaker problem. Rural areas also need to develop village water and sewer systems in the face of Alaska's civilization. Yet, some villages are none too eager to join the social and economic system of the "lower 48 states." "You wouldn't want to live in the village," Dorcas Rock, a delegate from Point Hope, told a Fairbanks delegate. "But it's my home; I want to stay there. The whole community feeds the rest of the community. I don't just feed my family when we get caribou or whale. Everybody shares." Sharing spilled over to the state IWY meeting where Alaska women found it necessary to learn about each other's lifestyles before tackling the business of the conference. Their resolutions reflect accep- about it, I think we should push for the rights of individuals to make their own decisions about abortion," Nancy Anderson, Kodiak, said. "Abortion is not the real issue; the issue is whether we have the right to decide for another person whether our belief is right for her." The idea carries over into other issues. Dove Kull, a retired delegate from Juneau, applies it to the problems of older women. "Age should not be the reason to take away a person's right to her own decisions." Individual rights and self-determination are the top priorities for the Alaska delegation and they color all of the state resolutions sent to Houston. Resolutions deal with such issues as preservation of the subsistence lifestyle of many Native women, support for displaced homemakers seeking new identities and employment and enforcement of laws preventing sex discrimination in education. Each of the 12 delegates and five alternates has her own point to make at the conference, but they agree on one basic tenet-that self-determination for the individual woman and for the general population of Alaska is necessary if the land of contrasts is to survive its current transition from frontier to boom town. Jane Yamashiro, delegation chairperson, is a senior associate at the Alaska Native Foundation in Anchorage and works with state school districts to eliminate race and sex discrimination. She believes that a self-determination interpretation must be applied to each of Alaska's resolutions. "If, through our coalitions and our talks with others, we keep emphasizing self-determination, diversity and individual rights translated in our own experiences of how we view the issues, the status of the individual and individual choices will remain our primary concern," Yamashiro said. She commended the Alaska delegation for its diversity. She thinks the women representing Alaska at the national conference in Houston can bring a much-needed diversity of ideas and expertise to the meeting. Another delegate, Shari Gross of Juneau, justified the small delegation's presence at the conference this way: "We have a say in this conference because we are the conference. We are the people and we have a right to participate in making the decisions that will affect our lives." Clockwise: ROSITA WORL, CAROLYN JONES, LYNNE WOODS, DIANE CARPENTER, JANE YAMASHIRO !«»«»«*ft*«' PAGE 8 NOVEMBER 18, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH