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Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977
Page 7
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Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977 - Page 7. November 18, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 26, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4125.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4125

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977 - Page 7, November 18, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 26, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4125.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 18, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 18, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
File Name femin_201109_533ag.jpg
Transcript • •.:• '■:■"■ - '••' '•• IE riml PAT F,ELD senecafcis f torch relov By Karey Bresenhan and Beverly Hebert In 1848, a farm woman driving her horse-drawn wagon to the Seneca Falls convention on women's rights wrote of her pride in "being part of a great procession of women moving forward." By this morning, more than 2,000 women will know first-hand just what that farm woman meant. They are runners in the IWY Torch Relay, the women who carried the torch 2,610 miles through 14 states from Seneca Falls, N.Y., to Houston as an active testimonial to American women on the move. The Torch Relay begins its final leg of the 2,610 miles at 11:30 a.m. today at Overlook Park on Allen Parkway, when all delegates and the public are invited to join the runners in walking the last mile from the park to Jones Plaza. At noon in Jones Plaza, the three Houston women who are the official torch- bearers for the last mile will present the torch and accompanying declaration to Billie Jean King, representing women in sports. Expected to attend the presentation are Bella Abzug, Maya Angelou, Janey Briscoe, Liz Carpenter, Judy Carter, Sey Chassler, Sissy Farenthold, Lenore Her- shey, Judge Sarah T. Hughes and Gloria Steinem. The Torch Relay was originally planned to add sports to the conference in a meaningful way, according to Coordinator Pat Kery, and it grew to reflect the broad-based support of American women for the conference. The relay was organized by the National Commission on International Women's Year and the National Association of Girls and Women in Sports. It was sponsored by women- Sports magazine, the Road Runner Club of America and the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. From its beginnings as a good idea with no money to carry it out, the relay grew to be one of the most symbolic events of the conference. "Since the Commission didn't have the money for the project, we voted to support it with enthusiasm," said Sey Chassler, IWY commissioner and editor of Redbook. "Liz Carpenter suggested we contact the President's Council on Physical Fitness, and they told us about the Road Runners. Then things started to move. The bottleneck broke when the National Association of Girls and Women in Sports helped us organize and provided a network of coaches." The relay began Sept. 28 in Seneca Falls with a candlelight kick-off led by Sissy Farenthold, Judy Carter and New York Lt. Gov. Mary Ann Krupsak. Kathy Switzer, the first woman to run the Boston Marathon, began the relay the next morning after receiving the torch from Millicent Brady Moore, a descendant of Susan Quinn Clark, a participant in the 1848 convention. Donna deVerona, Olympic gold medal winner, and Carole Oglesby, president of the National Association of Girls and Women in Sports, also ran the first few miles of the relay. Runners represented all parts of life in America. They included local and national celebrities, mayors, governors, athletes, homemakers, students, grandparents, mothers, nurses, secretaries, teachers, farm women, rural women, city women, IWY commissioners and some men. Along the way, runners got lost, the torch went out, a male track team quit, and women of all ages experienced the thrill of making history. Many runners are former women athletes, now in other jobs, who no longer run regularly. , 4 I I t I . - - - -Purveyors of Fine Motorcars— 1956 Rolls Royce, Silver Cloud I 688-6548 928-6561 hous'ov'kol'man n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama • Houston 77006 -1713) 523-2521 PAGE 6 NOVEMBER 18, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH