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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
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Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 2. November 18, 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1977). Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4120

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18 - Page 2, November 18, 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4155/show/4120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough 1977-11-18
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 18, 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 37 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_533ab.jpg
Transcript e dedicate ourcov* of the first National Wbmerfs Conference in the "Daily Breaktrirough' to the first women voters irilexas OnMarch 26, 1918, Gov. William Hobby signed the bill giving Texas womenthe vote at primary elections and in nominating conventions.300,000 women registered to vote in the next gubernatorial primary, helping defeat Hobby's opponent, Jim Ferguson. These women were among the first to register to vote in Texas in the culmination of a 50-year long struggle for suffrage. The first suffrage resolution, presented at a state constitution convention in 1868 by T. H. Mundine of Burleson County, was rejected. Organized agitation began in 1893, when 48 Dallas women formed the Texas Equal Rights Association. In 1896 the Association dissolved due to a quarrel over whether to have Susan B. Anthony speak in Texas. The Finnigan sisters of Houston, Annette, Elizabeth and Katherine, revived the movement in 1903, but with their departure from Texas in 1905 the movement again died. Local societies were organized in Austin in 1908 and in San Antonio in 1912, and by 1913 enough interest had again been generated to form a state suffrage association. Texas women won the right to vote in the state primary in March 1918, and with the ratification of the 19th Amendment in June of 1919, they gained full suffrage. (Eh to suffragist Christia Adair There's something missing from black suffrage as having priority over worn- America's picture of women's suffrage, en's suffrage. Black women worked hard in the battle A rift opened between white and for women's right to vote, but in many black women at an 1869 Equal Rights states it was 20 years later before they got Association meeting, where abolitionists to cast ballots. endorsed the 14th and 15th Amendments Christia Adair of Houston is one but admonished that it was 'The Negro's woman who lobbied, petitioned and pro- Hour" and women's demands for voting tested her way to the voting booth, taking rights would only cloud an already contro- with her other black women who for years versial issue. had been denied their rights. She was The rift steadily deepened toward among the daughters and granddaughters the turn of the century. Capitalizing on of the same women who had worked so racist feelings, some suffragists pounded hard to pass the 15th Amendment granting home the argument that white women voting rights to black men in 1870, and to were superior to black men and should, get white women their voting rights in therefore, have voting rights, too. One 1920. But in most southern states, black went so far as to say, "If American men are women did not vote until the 1940s. willing to leave their women in a position "I never have been a 'good nigger,' " as degrading as this, they need not be sur- 0 says the woman who has been described prised when American women resolve to 1 by politicians and friends as "sweet and lift themselves out of it." I great," "quiet and determined" and "very Gerda Lerner in her Black Women ? unassuming and surprisingly courageous." in White America anthology quoted a : The battle she has fought for nearly all women's newspaper in Denver, where t her 84 years began long ago. women voted in their first election in In the 1860s, women were involved 1894: "Readers will be interested to know 3 in both the abolition and the women's what special part the colored women have ' rights movements. While many white and taken in the election. Most of them have d black women supported abolition of sla- done admirable work in the interest of the 5 very, white women advocated universal, Republican party. They also formed clubs 3 rather than black suffrage. Blacks of both of their own and heroically helped their [ sexes during Reconstruction tended to see (Continued on page 32) DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 18, 1977 PAGE 1