Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough, February 1980
Page 27
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 27. February 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 25, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/365.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1980). Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 27. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/365

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 27, February 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 25, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/365.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 27
File name femin_201109_557ay.jpg
Transcript The Mustang Island beaches were relatively deserted. oil into the factotum of our development. Fortunately, the country has sufficient conditions that lead us to think that this will be possible. We have other very important raw materials. We have an interesting market. We have a population that has well-trained sectors to face these problems, and we have confidence in ourselves. The country in previous times had an acceptable rate of development based on oil sufficiency. This decreased in the years 1973 and 1974 when we were forced to import. I believe we have sufficient conditions in order to make it possible to organize starting with petroleum but not depending on it, and to think early about a substitute for this sort of energy, which is nonrenewable. We believe that this is as good for the country as it is for all humanity. We are a frontier generation. We are now between two systems of energy. We must be very much aware of this so as not to leave an unresolvable problem for our children. Wright: The average Mexican citizen has heard much about the benefits oil can bring. But only a small percentage of the population has actually witnessed any immediate effects. President Lopez Portillo is determined to stabilize his country's soaring rate of inflation. The president is quick to recognize that too much oil- related revenue will only worsen his country's economy. President Lopez Portillo: We believe that it is not the reserves that must lead the exploitation within a national system, but the capacity the country has to invest and to exploit oil. Once the investment has been made, we will only export as much as the country's economy is able to digest so as not to bring about the worst sort of inflation due to financial congestion. This would force a country that has such serious lacks as ours to plan, paradoxically, for the exportation of capital. We are fitting our oil ex ploitation to our economic need. Wright: Because of its abundant oil and natural gas supplies, the Mexican government's responsibilities extend beyond its own borders. Developed and under-developed countries now look to Mexico for help in solving their energy needs. President Lopez Portillo: We have recently proposed at the United Nations the desirability of a world plan for fuel where the needs of all countries are considered, not just the large countries, the big consumers. All need energy, but we do not want to have deformations of this type which would only accelerate disorder. If we are going to consider the needs of others, it would be reasonable to consider them within a certain order and not merely to increase the disorder. We understand very well the need the United States has for fuel. We also understand the needs of Nicaragua and Costa Rica, which are small countries in a very unfavorable comparative position. We would like all humanity to understand the need of ordering the passage of going from one fuel period to another, of ordering and rationalizing the exploration, the exploitation, the distribution and the consumption of the present-day sources of energy, basically, oil. Wright: President Lopez Portillo also recognizes that the United States is aware of Mexico's burgeoning influence. President Lopez Portillo: Naturally conditions change, and, of course, Mexico's position has changed. In view of the fact that it now has something that substantially interests the United States. Robert Krueger: Well, I think that we have a changing relationship in our relations with Mexico. And that relationship is changing in part because Mexico is now the 11th largest country in the world. Mexico is taking an increasingly important role internationally, certainly in this hemisphere, actually throughout the world. And during a time of a changing relationship, there are sometimes some growing pains in that relationship. I think it is to U.S. advantage to have strong neighbors. And I think the increased strength in Mexico is something we ought to be pleased about. It doesn't necessarily make it easier in a time of transition, but I think it is important for the future. President Lopez Portillo: What I would like to say is we would very much like to have a more balanced relationship with the United States so that we could solve a number of problems that we have. I would definitely like to be less dependent on the United States, and the United States would perhaps like to depend less on OPEC. As long as a country depends more on itself, it will be in a better situation. But I believe we should contemplate the relationship with the United States as being a respectful balance and a broadening of our relationship with the rest of the world, always recognizing the force of geography. There is a geographic logic. It is evident that between the neighbors with a borderline of 2000 kilometers and complementary economies that formulas must be found to have justice without exploitation. We must go from one system to another which is broader and more understanding and comprehensive. Wright: It should be noted that throughout the entire blowout incident, natural gas sale negotiations between Mexico and the United States went on without interruption. The two countries concluded a deal this past September. The first supplies of Mexican gas should reach the United States on January first, 1980. The jeopardy posed by the runaway well has all but passed. But its repercussions will be heard well into 1980, and maybe beyond. Kirby Lilljedahl: Environment, in a sense, is what we sell. In order to have a place for the people of Texas to come to, to vacation, and to enjoy the beach, we've got to keep the environment in such a manner that this is inviting to the people of Texas, and the midwest as a matter of fact. Ralph Thompson: We locally, there was nothing we could do but sit and wait, and that added to the frustration, knowing that it was out there, not knowing if and when it was coming, how severe it would be, and I think that's still the mood here to a great extent, because the well has not at this point in time been capped. If it continues to spill, who knows what might happen next spring when conditions change. The currents and the winds could conceivably bring that oil back. Jimmy Halliburton: I was saddened because I moved to the coast, to South Padre Island, because of the beautiful beaches, and it was a very horrible sight to see a beach that looked like it was blacktop. I wasn't really mad; I guess in a way I was, but I didn't have any anger, it was just the situation that we wish it hadn't happened, but it happened. POSTSCRIPT 'The well still hasn't been capped. Oil fighter Red Adair and his crew are on the scene now. They anticipate having it capped within the next two weeks. Of course the've been saying this for months. There is still no bilateral treaty between Mexico and the U.S. to cover environmental catastrophes in the future. It's the primary issue because we can look forward to a lot more of these blow-outs in the Bay of Campeche because they're going to do so much drilling down there." -Kevin Caffrey HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 27 FEBRUARY 1980