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Houston Breakthrough 1980-02
Pages 22 and 23
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Pages 22 and 23. February 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 2, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Pages 22 and 23. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/362

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Pages 22 and 23, February 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 2, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 22 and 23
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_557av.JPG
Transcript ON THE BEACH Who is responsible for the world's largest oil spill? The following is a direct transcript of Blow-out: A Special Report on the Ixtoc I oil spill, which aired on KUHT-TV in early January. Susan Wright moderated the program, which was developed, written and produced by Kevin Caffrey; Virginia Mampre, KUHT program director, was executive producer. Susan Wright, Moderator: Since June 3 of last year, a Mexican-owned and -operated oil well in the Gulf of Mexico has spewed thousands of barrels of crude into the Gulf. All efforts to cap the runaway well have failed. Not even renowned oil fire fighter, Red Adair, has been able to stem the constant flow of oil and natural gas. There is no telling if and when the well will be capped. Meanwhile, residents of the south Texas coast have lost millions of dollars in tourist revenues. Fishermen are wondering if the spill will damage future shrimp and redfish crops. Charges and counter-charges over liability for damages have swelled print and television news reports since August. Lawsuits have been lodged against the Mexican oil and drilling companies, and against SEDCO, the drilling contracting firm founded by Texas Governor Bill Clements. But throughout the entire episode, the frightening spectre of future spills has been foremost in everybody's minds. Ken Biglane, Director of the Division of Oil and Special Materials Control, E.P.A. Co-Chair, National Response Team: We do have fine technology in this country, but let me state emphatically that there is no nation in the world that has the capability to deal with the amount of oil on the high seas that has impacted the Gulf of Mexico. The technology in the world is just not there. The best we can do is to hope to minimize the effects of the oil that does reach our continental shelf areas, our estuary areas, and, finally, our shoreline. The best way to minimize damage, of course, in these kinds of instances, is not to let them happen in the first place. Wright: Despite the considerable damage caused by the spill, Mexican leaders have reason to rejoice. The vast quantities of oil escaping from the well confirm their belief that the Bay of Campeche holds unequaled hydrocarbon deposits. Officials now estimate that nearly 800 million barrels of crude lie beneath the damaged well head. Moreover, total proven reserves for the entire Bay of Campeche are now listed at over 10 million barrels. For a nation that has faced severe economic conditions for many years, oil could provide a solid foundation for a secure future. Jose Portillo, President of Mexico: We want to make oil the (route to) the development of the country. The plans we have . . . make it possible for us to have energy available in sufficient amounts for our development; and the surplus will be exported. On both of these points, we are certain that the plans we are drawing up will permit us in the following years to solve the basic problems of our country- namely, unemployment. Wright: Oil-dependent countries such as the United States and Japan are anxiously anticipating the continued development of the Mexican oil industry. Many feel that Mexico's huge reserves will buy the time needed to refine alternative energy sources. . . We'll look at the immediate effects of the blowout, and Mexico's reaction to its new-found wealth. During the first days of the blowout disaster, the runaway well, called Ixtoc I, was one of 18 wells in the Bay of Campeche belonging to PEMEX, Mexico's nationalized oil company. No one imagined that the blowout would be uncappable, or that the resulting spill would' become the largest ever recorded. Oil gushed from the ocean floor at the rate of 30,000 barrels a day. On June 27th, oil fire fighter Red Adair and his crew managed to deactivate the flow from the well. An hour later, it blew out again. Adair immediately called for the drilling of two relief wells. These wells would intercept the crude and divert it to nearby tankers. PEMEX officials cautioned, however, that the relief wells would not be in operation before early fall. In the meantime, two million barrels of crude could be expected to spill into the Gulf. In July, owners of the drilling rig presented a theory explaining the cause of the blowout. On June 3, the drill bit had actually penetrated a formation containing nearly 800 barrels of oil. Once the bit hit this open space, the drilling mud used to send residue to the surface streamed out of the drill shaft. Drilling stopped immediately. After a period of time, workers on the rig started to withdraw the drill bit to assess the problem. As the withdrawal began, blowout stage one was reached: the drilling pipe was raised to the upper sections of the rig. The thicker drill collar was elevated to a height just above the surface of the water. Unfortunately, the drill collar was at the same level as the standard blowout preventor, or B.O.P. when stage two began. Two sections of the drill pipe had stuck together and workers were unable to pull all of the pipe onto the rig. The remaining drill pipe started banging against the rig. The resulting sparks ignited natural gas that had flowed through the drill shaft to the surface. Normally, the blowout preventor would have sheared off the drilling pipe and stopped the flow of gas. But the preventor was not designed to cut pipe as thick as the drill collar. The fire raged out of control. The derrick started to melt down and the spider deck ignited. Workers were forced to abandon the rig. The fire continued to spread, and the derrick completely melted away. The remaining pipe on the rig slid into the water, knocking the B.O.P. out of line by about 10 degrees. Red Adair's efforts had failed because the preventor was out of skew. He was able to cap the top of the B.O.P. but within an hour, the pressure grew so intense that the oil and gas began to flow directly from the floor of the bay. Capping the gusher was now virtually impossible. Once Red Adair's efforts failed, grim reality set in. Oil was still spewing from the well at a rate of 30,000 barrels a day. PEMEX of- 23 FEBRUARY 1980