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Houston Breakthrough 1980-02
Page 15
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 15. February 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/355.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/355

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 15, February 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/355.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_557ao.jpg
Transcript WHO SHOULD GO? A poll of politicians and people on the draft BY ROSE WRIGHT President Carter's State of the Union message raised a lot of questions as to what our future military involvement would be in the Persian Gulf and exactly who would be involved. In his announcement in support of a renewed draft registration system, Carter said: "I hope that it will not be necessary to reimpose the draft. However, we must be prepared for that possibility. For this reason, I have determined that the Selective Service System must now be revitalized/' Carter had the authority to resume registration of men between the ages of 18 and 26, but he did not address the issue of registration of young women until a public statement issued on February 8. The president announced a proposal which called for the registration of men and women, ages 19 and 20, for the draft. He is opposed to having women serve in combat roles. Under the proposal, everyone will eventually register on his or her 18th birthday. No draft cards would be issued under the presidents proposed plan. The national response to his position has been varied and the issue is expected to create quite a debate in Congress. This month, Breakthrough contacted members of the Texas congressional delegation to determine how they would respond to the question of registration, the draft, and the inclusion of women in the military. Breakthrough also interviewed local people on the street with the same question. Our interviews were conducted prior to President Carter's most recent decision affecting the registration of women. The Politicians U.S. Senator John Tower, R-Wichita Falls "I am opposed to the registration of women. You can call me an old stick- in-the-mud; the primary need is for people who can fit into a combat situation." U.S. Senator Lloyd Bentsen, O-Houston "I know it isn't a politically popular decision, but I believe women ought to register. They too owe an obligation to serve their country, either in the military or through some other form of service, perhaps in areas of need in their com- Rose Wright is a student intern at Breakthrough. munities. I've been in combat though, and I don't think it's realistic or right for women to be down in the trenches in time of war. I prefer to see them in roles that would free men to do the combat. I say this as a former supporter of the volunteer army—the concept just isn't working. The government has to quit kidding the people about it." U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Lake Jackson "Congressman Paul is opposed to the registration of both men and women. He does think that women should be treated exactly equally with men and that both should have the right not to go because he doesn't believe in registration or the draft. He believes that both should have the right to volunteer for any job in the armed forces and both should have the right not to go." U.S. Rep. Bob Eckhardt, D-Houston "I think in light of the events that have occurred on the borders of Russia, the president had to raise the question of registration, but I think it's terribly premature to decide that we should put a draft into effect due to the nature of what has occurred in the various wars this country has engaged in in the past. "First of all I think the draft, in something like WWII dimensions, would drastically affect the lives of all our young people and if it were rashly applied, it could threaten our true security. I think to pull a great number of people out of the productive economy and on to government pay in the army would immediately sweep away all possibility of lowering the deficit and would at the same time retard productivity. "In many instances, young men and, I'm sure, a great number of young women, would elect combat duties and if they want it they should have it. I think women should have the opportunity to participate in all aspects of the military whether there's a war or not. But in circumstances which clearly dictate that a total mobilization is necessary, I think there should be nothing in the process of selective service that would facilitate one group of people sending another group of people to war. I think that's one of the very bad things that has perhaps encouraged a warlike attitude in our country. Too frequently, the middle-aged and insecure have sent the young and the insecure to war without bearing their proportion and share of sacrifice." U.S. Rep. Charles Wilson, D-Luf kin (Julie Booty—aide) "Congressman Wilson is undecided as to whether or not women should register for the draft. He is convinced that women should not be drafted for the Armed Services. He has said specifically that he doesn't see any need for women to register, because he is opposed to using women in combat. He also said that the Armed Services are getting plenty of female volunteers but where they are really lacking is in male volunteers " U.S. Rep. Richard White, DEI Paso (Maxine Nagel—aide) "He believes that our manpower shortages are in the combat areas and because women are not used in combat, he does not believe that they should be either registered or drafted." U.S. Rep. Abraham Kazen, Jr., D-Laredo 'The President, in his State of the Union message, advocated registration of 18-26 year olds. I supported this proposal last year and I still favor it. According to the testimony we heard from the Armed Services Committee, an advanced registration system would save us 90-120 days if we ever had to renew the draft. I see no need for a draft now, but the uncertainties and even dangers that exist in some parts of the world today suggest we had better take the registration step now. "I do not know what the president will recommend concerning young women but on the basis of our hearings last year, I think there was a committee consensus that they should be registered. I feel, however, that if a draft ever comes, women should not be called for combat duty. "He thinks that as a general rule, women are not physically strong enough for the heavy duty of combat and also he does not want them exposed to the added dangers that would come to women if they were captured by the enemy." U.S. Rep. J. J. Pickle, D-Austin (Patsy Watkins—aide) "He supports registration and he supports registering women. On the draft, he is at this point against the draft for both men and women." U.S. Rep. Martin Frost, D-Dallas "I have already publicly stated that I support women being included in the registration. As to when we would have the draft, that's another matter and I would hope that we would not return to the draft any time soon. I do intend to vote for including women in the registration. I do not think that women should be put in combat positions though and I would want to make sure that if the draft is brought back, women would only be in non-combat positions. "I have publicly supported the ERA and whether in fact it is ever made part of the constitution is a separate issue. I'm not basing my support for registering women on the existence or the nonexistence of the E~RA. I think it's a question of equality and of responsibility and women should be called upon to bear part of the responsibility. I just don't think that women should be expected to do the same things that men do in terms of physical requirements. (If women were willing to go into combat) that's up to the Armed Services as to whether they feel women would be suitable." U.S. Rep. Jack Brooks, D-Beaumont "Although the decision is not being made now as to what role women would play in the event of the need to reinstate the draft, it is appropriate to include them in registration plans. Women have increasingly demonstrated their ability to handle areas which were traditionally considered the province of men alone. At this time it is not necessary to decide what activities would in fact be appropriate but it would be unwise not to proceed with the registration of women knowing that in the case of a national emergency, women are able to make substantial contributions toward our defense effort." U.S. Rep. Phil Gramm, D-College Station "First of all I am opposed to registering women if we're not going to draft them. I think a decision needs to be made about whether or not we're going to draft women before we register them. I think it's inefficient; it's expensive; it imposes a deadweight burden on everybody and we need to make the decision now about drafting women. "Before we can debate the philosophical issues, there are other issues that we need to get more information on. Number one: Clearly the legal status of women has changed since the last registration occurred and there are some very real questions legally, on whether or not we could defend the U.S. government against lawsuits if we drafted men and not women. That legal question needs to HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 15 FEBRUARY 1980