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Houston Breakthrough, February 1980
Page 12
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Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 12. February 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/352.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1980). Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 12. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/352

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 12, February 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/352.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location Call # HQ1101.B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
File name femin_201109_557al.jpg
Transcript ELECT PAUL COLBERT STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 80 • QUALITY EDUCATION should be the first priority with salaries and programs that will hold good teachers. • EQUAL RIGHTS are never guaranteed — they must be established and defended by an active voice. • FLOOD PREVENTION is impossible without the establishment of a comprehensive plan and a regional flood control authority. •MTA must be restructured for public control; public transit must be improved. • URBAN PARKS AND GREENBELTS must be encouraged. VOTE COLBERT ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28. Political advertisement paid for by Paul Colbert; 2416 West Holcombe; 644-5123. ■Selective Enterprises- Lisa Mach - commercial and residential real estate (co-owner of Plaza I Properties), Judy Doran - feminist attorney, Alethea Dollison - investments and property management, Sandra Hicks - property management and investments. Announcing an opportunity for women to invest in Houston REAL ESTATE. Selective Enterprises, Inc. is buying and managing income properties for investors. Limited partnerships and joint ventures are available. Minimum investment is $1000. Come join us and make your money work for you. Selective Enterprises, Inc. • Investments • Tax Shelter Advantages • Property Management 1001 Oxford Suite 100 Houston, Tx 77008 869-3848 MEDIA MATTERS continued Show in Arlington last week was ap parently designed exclusively for male members. At the same time that a general discussion on daily and weekly papers was scheduled, the TPA offered a Special Ladies Program, A More Beautiful You Glamour Clinic. "Mary Kay Cosmetics beauty consultants will teach you the latest methods of skin care and correct makeup application. Complimentary facials for a!! ladies by appointment." Mouston Police Chief Harry Caldwell is sensitive to criticism of his department. Never shy of media attention, Caldwell is fast with a quotable quote and does not suffer opposition gladly, or silently. (When invited to speak at the ACLU last year, Caldwell deftly turned the tables on the civil libertarians by accusing them of having "all the sympathy for the brown and the black, but none for the blue." When rumblings surfaced about the use of public funds for the protection of Mexico City's police chief last year — on a private visit here —Caldwell's retort was, better to spend the money than "have to scrape (the honored visitor) off the sidewalk.") That's one thing, to have a police chief who is sensitive to criticism — Justice of the Peace Al Green suggested on a KTRH Radio talk show recently that Caldwell may be ''temperamentally unsuited" for his job. It's quite another when the news manager of a local TV station comes across as equally sensitive to criticism of the police chief. Walt Hawver, manager of news operations at Channel 13, wrote a letter to Thelma Meltzer, replying to her comments on Caldwell's appearance, January 13, on Issues and Answers. Thorn Dicker- son, Channel 13 reporter, was commended by Meltzer for asking Caldwell some tough questions, to which the chief reacted very defensively, according to Meltzer and several viewers who called Dickerson after the show. "I can assure you," wrote Hawver, "Mr. Dickerson has no personal vendetta against Chief Caldwell." Meltzer had not mentioned any vendetta. "Harry is a man who does not hesitate to complain . . ." "Harry?" said Meltzer. "Hawver's a news person. Where does he get off calling the chief "Harry" in a letter to a viewer? It sure damages your faith in the objectivity of the media." Houston City Magazine folded on Wednesday, February 6. Two days later, it was back in busines under new ownership. The March City was ready to go when owner - publisher - editor-in-chief Francois de Menil suspended publication, as they say in the trade. Financial problems was the official reason given. Lack of interest on the part of de Menil was the unofficial word. "I guess Francois got tired of us," advertising director Paula Leone said in a televised news report. Within an hour of de Menil's announcement, the owners of "D" magazine were making advances, hotly pursued by Texas Monthly, Lute Harmon (owner of Cleveland and Monthly Detroit) and several other suitors. The Dallas Southwest Media Corporation, which owns "D" and Texas Homes, clinched the deal. Fast work, no hitch in publishing City. No harm, right? Wrong. When de Menil gathered the staff together (some not all), he informed them they were out of a job, gave them a month's pay and told them to have their Gabrielle Cosgriff is an editor of Breakthrough. desks cleaned out by Friday. Within minutes, he was on a plane to New York, leaving the staff in a state of shock. De Menil may have had some cracker jack business advice, but that was a crummy way to treat his employees. But de Menil still has his finger in the pie. The new owners say he will remain chairman of the board. "That gives him a fancy title," said one staffer, "and it keeps him out of our hair." E tc. . . Harold Scarlett, Post environmental writer, recently wrote an article on "Controlling I coyotes," (Jan. 20.) It was a fine article—except for the lead. "Senor coyote," began Scarlett, "called the deadliest destroyer of livestock now roaming the range ..." Don't we have enough barriers to communication without calling the deadliest destroyer of livestock "Senor?". .... Hearing- impaired viewers will soon be able to follow prime time TV programs, thanks to a "closed captioning system." The device will be sold by Sears, Roebuck at approximate cost. NBC, ABC and PBS will participate. CBS says they have their own plans John Chancellor, NBC anchor, said in an interview recently that Americans have reversed the roles that TV and print news should play in informing the public. "Television is good at some things," said Chancellor. "TV can take you where you cannot be. What at, is fact . . . factual stories where you have a lot of complicated material . . . The problem in this country is more and more people are turning to television for fact, and more and more newspapers are becoming transmitters of experience and features. And it's an upside-down mixture that I think is not very good for the country." The Times of London, famous for its death notices, has killed the term 'Ms.' Not in the obituaries, but in a supplement to its style book, the Fleet Street institution has announced that it will no longer use that designation. Times columnist Trevor Fishlock, in his London Diary, said the decision was a victory for common sense. He called Ms. "a faddish middle- class plaything and far from disguising the marital status of women, it draws attention to it." Impeccable logic, Fish- lock. . .In its 25th anniversary issue (Dec. 28), The Texas Observer celebrated by asking contributors to expound on the theme "Heading for the next 25." Molly Ivins, a trenchant, witty journalist, former co-editor of The Texas Observer and currently Rocky Mountain bureau chief of the New York Times made some observations on the media. "The Observer and its ilk are painfully needed. "The rest of the press," she continued, "is succumbing to two new dread journalistic evils. Celebrity journalism has reached such a nadir of idiocy that we now know more about Suzanne Somers than the Ayatollah Khomeini. The let-us- help - you - spend -your - money - trendily school of journalism gives us endless stories about the 10 best chili parlors, barbecue places and chicken-fried steaks. There are full-scale articles on where to buy the best caviar, sports cars and 10- gallon hats. New York magazine once ran a cover article on sheets—linens versus silks, flowers versus stripes. Who gives a rat's-ass about sheets?" Incidentally, Ivins last month wrote a piece on Texas Governor Bill Clements (God Love the Guv) for Houston City, a magazine which is wholeheartedly committed to the "let-us-help-you-spend- your-money-trendily school of journal- ism. HUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 12 FEBRUARY 1980