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Houston Breakthrough 1980-02
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 11. February 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/351

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 11, February 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_557ak.jpg
Transcript the Houston Chronicle. More in sorrow than in anger—since Karkabi has written, and written well, for Breakthrough in the past-it must be noted that the lead to her Steinem story was goddawful—in that 50's Lifestyle style. "She is en- visoned as aggressive, humorless, difficult, in fact, Gloria Steinem is anything but that. It is her sense of humor that is her most engaging, as well as surprising, quality. "With her long hair and tinted glasses, dressed simply but elegantly, the 45-year- old Ms. Steinem does not look much different than she did 17 years ago . . ." (If you can get past all that, it ends up being a pretty good interview). Dan O'Rourke, Channel 2 reporter, displayed the same fascination with Steinem's looks at a joint press conference at Breakthrough (Steinem talked about the changes in Ms. and we discussed our new direction). In 30 minutes, a lot of ground was covered. Nancy Carney (Ch. 11) and Elma Barrera (Ch. 13) asked Steinem about the impact made by the women's movement in the past decade and the structural changes Steinem saw taking place in 80s. O'Rourke zeroed in on Steinem's appearance and in spite of her reluctance to make a big deal of it, he continued to badger Steinem until he got a quote. Sure enough, that was the obligatory cute closing to the show that evening. "Few people anywhere look so much like they did 10 years ago as does Gloria Steinem. It's those glasses and the hair but she says it's just her. She puts her hair in a ponytail in the summertime and in the winter, it keeps her ears warm." Unfortunately, we found out more about O'Rourke than Steinem from that report. B y the way, Nancy Carney, who is the new host of the Morning iShow, has had some excellent shows. She did a lively half- hour with Gloria Steinem (Jan. 16), the next week interviewed Sissy Farenthold, and a week later interviewed Yvonne Broach, president of Houston Area NOW. Both Carney and her producer, Benny Dominguez, are to be commended for their emphasis on women's issues. Beats all those reactionary reports from Congressman Ron Paul who was becoming a weekly fixture. Tune in mornings at 7:30 a.m. It's the best morning offering for discussion of local and national issues. A year ago freelance writer Alison Cook dug out a trunkload of old clippings and wrote a cover story for City magazine on Houston gossip columnists Marge Crum- baker and Maxine Messinger. A year later, Alison (as in Marge and Maxine) has "The Page," her very own scoop column in the same magazine. She recently revealed that Garret Hobart, an obscure political columnist for Galveston In Between, is really the nom de plume of Republican State Representative Chase Untermeyer. Cook let it be known that Untermeyer writes about his fellow Republicans "in a style that is, well, less than reverential." He called the "merry men" around the governor "Clementines" and described St. Sen. and "Republican convert" Bill Braecklin, "a lazy pol." Apart from the ethical considerations of a public servant writing political commentary without stating his bias, the most interesting question is, who is the real Garret Hobart? You probably already knew this, but Hobart was President William McKinley's first vice-president. He died in office in 1899, and was succeeded by Teddy Roosevelt. Hobart's claim to fame was that, while presiding over the Senate, he cast the deciding vote which defeated the resolution to grant independence to the Philippines. recently, and when it ended Harmon said, "I wonder why Becky's smiling?" Padgett called Harmon, explained what was wrong with his remark, and was told, "You're being a little sensitive, aren't you?" When Padgett commented that he wouldn't make a joke like that about child abuse, Harmon answered, "Well, you've got a point, but this is different." He did promise, though, that he wouldn't steal jokes from the other d.j.s anymore. So everything's OK at KIKK. A federal grand jury has been questioning Judd Mcllvain, Ch. 11 TV reporter, about an educational film he produced in 1976 for Harris County Commissioner Bob Eckels. The film was designed to explain the county tax system and has been shown in area schools. The FBI is investigating possible mail ifefM &rje &tme$ May 4, 1913 "The N.Y. Times does not believe that the achievement of women's suffrage would increase either the happiness or the prosperity of women in America. It believes the bestowal upon women of the right to vote and their contact with men in political matters will deprive them of certain privileges they now enjoy..." May 13,1913 "The benefits of women's suffrage are almost wholly imaginary ... The inevitable result of suffrage will be to coarsen women and to lessen men's respect for them." August 12,1970 Despite the fact that the ERA was introduced 50 years ago in Congress, The N.Y. Times urges the Senate to stall on the ERA because "the range of such potential litigation is too great to be readily foreseen." April 11,1978 "Too much energy has gone into the fight for passage of the Amendment and not enough into other issues ... We hope and believe that the Amendment will some day prevail, but it should not prevail at too high a cost." The N. Y. Times urges Congress not to extend the deadline for ratification. (From National N.O.W.) Gail Padgett, of the Houston Rape Crisis Coalition, reports that her organization has been asked to participate in a one-hour PBS documentary called, tentatively, Doin' Life, and due to air in late August. Rape victims will be interviewed, as well as prisoners serving life terms for murder, rape and armed robbery. Texas governor Bill Clements wrote a letter to the executive director of the media center at Sam Houston State University, who is producing the program. Clements urged that victims, as well as rapists, be included. One of the most popular country and western songs just now is Coward of the County, which is about rape. It is a father's advice to his son that "you don't have to fight to be a man." So the son earns the name of coward, because he turns the other cheek etc . . . Until . . . he comes home one day to find that his Becky has been raped by three loutish brothers, so he naturally whups their ass, and the song ends, "Sometimes you have to fight to be a man." Gail Padgett heard KIKK Radio d.j. John Harmon playing the song fraud. "Agents allegedly suspect that at least twice the $55,000 cost of the film was donated through misrepresented solicitations," said a Houston Post story (Jan. 17). Mcllvain denied any wrongdoing, as did Eckels, who claimed the investigation was part of ongoing harassment by his political foes. Lynn Ashby, Houston Post columnist, wrote the script for the film. The investigation is expected to continue. Whatever the outcome, the question remains: is it a conflict of interest for Mcllvain and Ashby to be earning money from the county, when the county is a legitimate object of their scrutiny? Dan Patrick, sportscaster on Ch. 11 TV, belongs to the let-it- all-hang-out, subjective school of reporting. He editorializes at will and emotes all over the set. When the Americans were first taken hostage in Iran, Patrick appeared on the air with a small American flag, his voice rising to a Zindleresque pitch of outraged patriotism. More recently, swept up in Super Bowl fever, he interviewed Terry Bradshaw, quarterback of the Pittsburgh Steelers. "How much does your religion and Jesus have an effect on your performance on the football field?" asked Patrick. "I couldn't throw the football, I'd lost my confidence," confessed Bradshaw. "The peace and comfort I got through my prayer life and my rededication to him was the thing that relaxed me ... if I've had any success I want to credit him." Then Ft was time for the editorial. "Religion has had a big part in my life," intoned Patrick, "and I'm not ashamed to admit that. I think it's good to balance the bad stuff ... In recent years, so many people say there aren't any heroes. Some writers have looked for the negative . . . every sports team I've ever covered has a deep religious core. . ." and so on. When he finally wound down, anchor Steve Smith grinned weakly and said, "So you've been here about four months now, Dan?" (Patrick's unsolicited testimonial probably had the same effect in many households as it did in ours. You couldn't exactly call it prayer, but several people were heard to invoke the name of Jesus Christ.) Patrick's religion-in-sports angle is no doubt sincere. It does lend credence, however, to what Leigh Montville of the Boston Globe called "the great American theme contest." (The Selling of the Super Bowl, Time, Jan. 28.) 'There's no story, so everyone sits down and tries to manufacture one." And some people fantasize about stories they haven't read but would like to. In an amusing column about "News stories I would love to read," February 6, Lynn Ashby had this to say about Patrick : "Channel 11 sportscaster Dan Patrick has been granted full membership in the Brotherhood of American Clowns. 'It's something I've been wanting and working toward for years,' a happy Patrick said from behind his putty nose, while inflating his whoopee cushion. . ." We never said Ashby wasn't good for a laugh. The Columbia Journalism Review, in its current issue, gives a dart, its equivalent of a pan, to the Texas Press Association (TPA) and the Texas Association of Broadcasters, "for putting a tiger in their tank and jointly sponsoring the 1979 Student Editors Conference with Exxon U.S.A. Along with discussions on print and broadcasting, ethics and law, public opinion and politics—led by magazine editors, news producers, and such leading journalistic lights as Sander Vanocur and Fred Graham—students were treated to an analysis of the gas crisis by none other than the manager of public affairs for Exxon." And here's another dart to the TPA. Its Mid-Winter Convention and Trade — S CELEBRITY' JOURNAL ISM SHOULD ALSO ENJOY ANOTHER BANNER DECADE. AND HJE SEP. THE MARKET, PREVIOUSLYMONOPOUZED0Y"PEOPLE" AND 'PHOTOPLAY': MAKING ROOM FOR NEW-<&1 COMERS LIKE "TIME*AND "NEWSWEEK.'- \pWL - AND WHEREAS THE WASHINGTON "POST" RE - PORTEDON A RECORD 9.765 CELEBRfTTES PURJNO THE LAST DECADE, THEIR "STYLE" SECTION ED/TORS NOW EXPECT 70 MOVE NEARLY 16,000 UNITS OF PERSONALITY REPORTAGE^ INTHE'SO'sf ^ by G, B.Trudeau SO THE BOTTOM FRANKLY. LINE FOR SOFT MARK, HB'RE NEWS ? BULLISH. \ ^ HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 11 Fumtifcrr