Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1980-02
Page 10
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 10. February 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/350.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/350

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-02 - Page 10, February 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/350.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-02
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_557aj.jpg
Transcript EZHZOEZHEiE and other fishy goings on in the local press BY GABRIELLE COSGRIFF Houston Post columnists Lynn Ashby and Donald Morris seem, at first glance, to represent two vastly different philosophies- Morris, the conservative prophet-of-doom moralist; Ashby, the light-hearted iconoclast-punster. But, on closer inspection, the two are depressingly similar in their modus operandi. Ashby's periodic dives into local issues invariably muddy the waters with simplistic sarcasm. He did it last summer with a mangled attack on the U.S. Justice Dept. intervention in local elections, with his turning-the-tables 'men's advocate' piece on Nikki Van Hightower, Eleanor Tinsley's office space, coddling prisoners in Texas jails and, most recently, his reductio ad absurdum on the city council's proposed hiring of aides (Jan. 27). "After careful study," declaims Ashby, "I suggest that each member have a staff of at least 45, plus part-time help during the campaigns." He swings right into his well-worn formula: let's give them four-story office buildings in their districts, use of the contra-flow lane to the airport, their own plane, etc., right down to the last whimsical touch, "after they vote themselves season passes to Astroworld." No matter that there are arguments on both sides of this issue, and most issues he deals with, Ashby has an infallible instinct for the cheap shot. Morris works the same side of the street—he just starts at the other end of the block. The ex-C.I.A. operative (identified as such when deemed relevant) makes much of journalistic integrity. He reminds us often of our national folly and short-sightedness, which usually translates into caveats against liberalism and other related emotional disorders. (He has made occasional stabs at humorous writing, but these are mercifully rare and inflict no real damage.) In a recent column, "Chappaquiddick —a real non-issue" (Jan. 7) Morris takes to task the authors of Chappaquiddick Revisited, Richard L. and Thomas L. Tedrow, for verging "perilously close to yellow journalism" in their treatment and analysis of that incident. Of course, in describing their proximity to that jaundiced state, Morris finds it neces sary to rehash all the juicy details. "The evidential web is damning," he concludes. "The authors might have strengthened it even further had they managed a more objective tone . . . There is evidence the girl survived the crash and was trapped in an air bubble in the inverted car for a time (people have survived many hours under such circumstances) before she drowned. But to dwell on this while concurrently having Kennedy on a telephone seeking advice about his political career is inexcusable; it is just such gratuitous slime which has hampered rational consideration of Chappaquiddick in the past." Morris' "objective tone" and "rational consideration" are his standard red herrings. The end result of his analysis was to make available to his readers the "gratuitous slime" he sanctimoniously condemns. It's bad enough to be exposed to this kind of journalism from Post employees, but do we have to take it from their overlords too? Henry E. Catto Jr. is the son-in-law of Oveta Culp Hobby and a member of the board of directors of the Houston Post. Several weeks ago, the Post published a piece on its op-ed page, written by Catto and headed "Phoney foreign euphemisms should carry warning labels." The piece was first published in the Washington Post (December 13) under the headline "On our way, semantically, to Munich." His premise was that the press has developed "a sharply heightened sense of skepticism . . . when dealing with statements by U.S. government figures" but that they "swallow uncritically the most transparent propaganda if it comes from a foreign source." He makes some points which, if left unembellished, could be persuasive. It's the overkill that undermines his argument. For example, he asks why did not the American media find out if the "students" holding the Americans hostage in Tehran were really students. Did they attend classes? Good point. But then: "Is the whole scene a bizarre fraternity initiation? Do these students engage in terror for credit? If so, what are they taking, American Humiliation 101?" "Socialist" is next. Catto points out that socialist is used to mean communist. Good point. What he neglects to consider is that socialist can also mean socialist. (Even Freud allowed as how a cigar can, on occasion, be just a cigar.) "The unwary," says Catto, "conjure a picture of gentle Fabians taking tea in their London salons, clucking earnestly at capitalist outrage. Or of Harold Wilson puffing benignly on his pipe . . . 'Socialism' is a euphemism used by the communist propaganda apparat." (Shades of James Kilpatrick, who likes to call feminists "comrades.") He then takes off after "the Soviet lap dog, Fidel Castro" and "the rancid ravings of the ayatollah" and concludes with "misrepresentation and manipulation from abroad must be avoided; to do otherwise is to go, semantically, to Munich." Catto's pompous hyperbole guarantees that, in spite of some valid points, his diatribe goes, semantically, nowhere. Lest anyone feel that the name of The Houston Post has been changed to The Whipping Post. . . Arthur Wiese, Washington bureau chief, did a concise, information-packed article (Jan. 20) on the Iowa caucus, with a clever illustration of the candidates by Howard Paveglio. Post reporter Janis Parks did a nice review of Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles, a six-hour, three-part adaptation on NBC of his famous stories. Parks felt that the roles of the women in "this often splendid program" were sadly in need of updating (for a story supposedly set in 1990). "The role that added insult to injury," said Parks, "was drawn by Gayle Hunni- cutt. . . Ruth Wilder, pretty as a picture, bounces all over the universe with two kids in tow and voices no more fear and questioning than if the Wilders were moving to Akron." By the way, how long do you have to write about TV at the Post before you get to be called a TV writer? Parks has been doing this job for a long time now and is still called "Post Reporter." Her predecessor, C. W. Skipper, was TV Editor. Vicki Macias surfaced from doing Post TV logs to write a sensible, thoughtful review of "The $5.20 an Hour Dream," a two-hour CBS movie (air date Jan 26). Linda Lavin starred as a divorced mother who seeks a better-paying job on the all-male assembly line. About that movie: Twiss Butler, Bay Area feminist, is to be applauded for publicizing it locally, as is Kathy Bonk from National N.O.W. for coordinating the national PR campaign. Butler prevailed on KHOU-TV to promote, not only the film, but the issues it raised—women in blue collar jobs and unions, non-payment of child support and the effects on children of mothers who work outside the home. The station cooperated fully, and Butler got together a panel of women to appear on Nancy Carney's Morning Show the day before the film aired. They were Helen George, program manager of the Neighborhood Center Child Care Association, Diana Osborne, chief steward, Communications Workers of America and president of the Houston Coalition of Labor Union Women, and Carro Hinder- stein, an attorney. Butler also arranged for attorney Jo Ann Doughtie to be interviewed by Bill Balleza on News- center II at noon that day, to talk about child support and fair employment practices. Ann Hodges, TV editor of the Houston Chronicle, devoted a little over a column inch to the movie. Her big story that day was the 10-year celebration of Marcel la Perry's Econocast, a commercial for Perry's Heights Savings Association. Then there's Post reporter Pamela Lewis, who did a splendid interview with Gloria Steinem (Jan. 20) in town recently to publicize changes in the format of Ms. magazine. Steinem is always articulate and quotable, but it was a mark of Lewis' research skills (she came by way of the Post library) that she drew out some facets of Steinem's background and philosophy that were new, at least to this writer. One wishes the same could be said of Barbara Karkabi's Steinem interview in DOONESBURY GOOD EVENING. "MARVELOUS"MARK HERB. CHATTING WITH MEDIA CRITIC ALBERT SCHOENEELD, AUTHOR OF THE /4j'IDEL> PRAISED REPORT, "FUTURE SCHLOCK. " PROFESSOR SCHOENFELD ON THE BASIS OF YOUR LATEST RESEARCH, U/HAT SORT OF MEDIA TREND5 DO YOU FORESEE FOR THE DECADE AHEAD? \ WELL, MARK, TO BEGIN UIITH, HUE foresee AM INCREASE IN MOOD JOURNALISM, E<SPE- CIALLY IN THE BIO - 6ER PAPERS / JIWBI j&^ f PdRJNO VIE "JO'S, THE MEDIA SPOTTED APPROXIMATELY 7500 TRENDS. UJE THINK THE TREND IS TOM/ARDS EVEN MORE TRENDS, PERHAPS UOOO BY 1989, 'REFLECTING THE RESULTS OF OVER 9^00 INDEPENDENTLY CONPUCTEP POLLS. IJ3V/BB HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 10 FEBRUARY 1980