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Houston Breakthrough, February 1980
Page 4
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Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 4. February 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 2, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/344.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1980). Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/344

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1980 - Page 4, February 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 2, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/371/show/344.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 32 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
File Name femin_201109_557ad.jpg
Transcript UH'lJIHl.l.'k Cold war heats up Last month, in our issue on the decade, we zeroed in on the violent, war-torn year of 1970. Who would have thought that in the first weeks of 1980 we'd be discussing the possibilities of another war. The president wants to register all 19 and 20 year olds and has asked Congress for authority to register women for the first time in our history. (For local and national reaction, see story, page 14). On the other hand, we have some good news to report on the home front. In January we welcomed Rose Wright, our student intern from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. We had a Breakthrough staff party and surprised her by inviting Gloria Steinem, who was in town talking about the recent changes in Ms. magazine. Rose will be working at Breakthrough until the end of March. Her internship here is part of Antioch's Co-operative Education Program. Her first job here was to transcribe the Judy Chicago interview (see page 18). No small feat. She then took on the draft registration interviews, calling all members of the Texas Congressional delegation and accosting Houstonians on their lunch breaks. "Hello, we'd like to know - " "Sorry, I 'm late for lunch." or "No, I don't want to buy youi tape recorder." A tough assignment for a rookie reporter, but Rose and photographer Gary Allison Morey braved the cold shoulders talking to people in the street about the Cold War. What struck us in all the casual war talk in the White House was that they were talking about our children. So, that's who we put on the cover: Vanessa Estrada, daughter of Cilia Teresa, and my son, Michael. Cilia Teresa has four draft age children and feels people are removed from the very idea of war because we've never fought on American soil. "I guess people feel that they'll be sitting in front of the television eating potato chips, drinking a beer and watching the war like a football game." Vanessa says she will go to Canada if the draft is reactivated. Michael is ambivalent. His mother is not. I have a daughter and a son and am opposed to either of them being drafted. In prinicpal, if men have to register then so should women, but it is ironic that women don't have the E.R. A. yet. How can women be drafted "to defend a Constitution " that excludes them? — G .C. In the February issue, we planned to write about the collaboration of Chancellor Alfred Neumann and Dean Calvin Cannon in bringing The Dinner Party to Houston (the University of Houston at Clear Lake City, that is) next month. Instead, the story that broke in mid-January (see opposite page) is one about Chancellor Neumann removing Dean Cannon as dean and demoting him to director of special university events, with specific responsibility for The Dinner Party. For weeks rumors linked the dean's dismissal with financial mishandling of the Dinner Party project and raised concern over the possible adverse effects on the project itself. At the request of the school paper, Neumann (in mid-February) issued the first official statement on the whole matter, reassuring his support for The Dinner Party — still leaving vague the main reasons for the dean's dismissal. It now appears that The Dinner Party is safe from politics. "Either through design or accident, they did not lower the boom on Dean Cannon until the project was far enough along under its own steam atleast not to financially jeopardize The Dinner Party project," said a grateful member of The Dinner Party planning committee, praising Cannon's work for organizing support "in Houston and all over Texas." This same member said, however, that she was distressed to see the effect the dismissal has had on Dean Cannon, "They have done this in a way that was maximally humiliating to him." One who should know about such things is Dr. Nikki Van Hightower. The former UH assistant professor of political science once told an AAUW gathering, "I find the nasty world of politics far less nasty than the academic world. I find politics far more open and honest." It would be less than honest to report how difficult it was to get word out of Clear Lake. We had better communication during the last flood. Protocol demanded some official word from the chancellor and no one —the dean nor faculty — wished to go on record until then. Once we had the chancellor's statement, we wanted our interview with him and were first told he did not wish to add anything to his prepared statement. It was clear the Clear Lake administration wanted no publicity. "We don't publicize such matters," both the chancellor and the provost and vice chancellor told Breakthrough. We persisted and were granted an interview. Neumann affirmed his strong support for The Dinner Party. "Let me make this very clear, I was one of the first to back The Dinner Party with university funds (Neumann committed $7500 toward the project, the largest single contribution to date). "When Dean Cannon proposed the project — I was fortunately briefed — I immediately made resources available. If attendance for the show is less than we expect, who is going to lose money? The university. Our neck is way out, which means my neck." So, The Dinner Party, no stranger to museum politics, has just survived its first bout with university politics. "This episode, " insisted Cannon in his new role as director of special university events, "should not detract from the emphasis that should be properly given to The Dinner Party." Let's hope not. - J.B. Rose Wright, Breakthrough's student intern from Antioch College. ^KHUUST0N| ii | DKCttTOtMUjIl February 1980 Vol. 5, no. 1 ADVERTISING Shirley Bryson, Ailene English CIRCULATION Beth Adam, Missy Hauge Debra Thornton COPY EDITORS Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff Lynne Mutchler, Rose Wright EDITORS Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff David Crossley OFFICE Janice Blue, Rose Wright PHOTOGRAPHERS Daniel Bissonnet, Janice Blue David Crossley, Theresa DiMenno Bill Dennis, Gary Allison Morey Danette Wilson PRODUCTION Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff David Crossley, Gary Allison Morey Rose Wright PROOFREADERS Gabrielle Cosgriff, Rose Wright RADIO SHOW Nancy Lane Fleming and Rita Saylors, Co-hosts on KPFT-FM and production staff: Blanca Balderas, Gertrude Barnstone, Michelle Batchelder, Leslie Conner, Jack Drake, Stella Fleming, Marge Glaser, Karen Saylors TAPE TRANSCRIBERS Juliet Clarke, Rose Wright TYPESETTERS Morris Edelson, Lynne Mutchler Virginia Myers Second-class postage paid at Houston,Texas. Houston Breakthrough USPS 413130. is published monthly (except for the bimonthly issues of July/August and December /January) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004. Mailing address: P. 0. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions are $7 (one year), $13 (two years) and $18 (three years). Library and institutional rates are $15 (one year), $20 (two years) and $25 (three years). Newsstand and single copy rate is $1.00. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201. POSTMASTER- Send form 3579 to Houston Breakthrough, P. 0. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH FEBRUARY 1980