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Houston Breakthrough, November 1980
Page 22
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Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 22. November 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1980). Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 22. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3673

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 22, November 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, November 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location Call # HQ1101.B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 22
File name femin_201109_565t.jpg
Transcript UlUMMMl SHOP NOW FOR HOLIDAY FEASTS AND GIFTS A 1'Feast Natural Food Store and Del! 3827 DUNLAVY 528-8905 %m$x< LONG ON NUTRITION 'Let thy food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be thy food." — Hippocrates 'The human body may be compared with a clay sculpture. Corresponding to the internal wire frame of the sculpture, we have a bony skeleton, hinged here and there to permit motion. In order to give this structure life and being, there are some 10 trillion (10,000,000,000,000) cells scattered throughout, occupying, together with the body fluids, every available interstice. Each cell carries out some specialized function. They range from those of the simple fibroblast, which is busily at work keeping the reinforcing material in good shape, and the lymphocytes and other white cells, which destroy invading bacteria and cancer cells, to the highly complex cells of the brain, which formulate and transmit the orders for all this corporate activity and which interact with one another in such a way as to fashion our consciousness, provide our memory bank, and permit us to think and reason." —Ewan Cameron and Linus Pauling, Cancer and Vitamin C "If every cell in the body gets the nutrients it needs," says Houston nutritionist Dr. Ruth Yale Long, "every cell will be healthy, every organ will be healthy, and the organism as a whole will be healthy." The idea of cellular health and the link between diet and disease goes back to Hippocrates and the ancient Greeks: "Let thy food be thy medicine, and thy medicine be thy food." In the 60's, the writings of nutritionist Adele Davis [Let's Eat Right to Stay Fit and Let's Get Well) provided food for thought on the American diet, and turned thousands of families on to vitamins and natural foods. Her writings changed a lot of lifestyles and at least one career-Ruth Yale Long, a Houston high school English teacher retired from her job to become a nutritionist. Long recalls the process. "It was right after WWII when the American diet changed. I went right along with the switch from garden vegetables and whole grains to convenience and 'instant' foods." Her health, she says, deteriorated with her diet. "I was drinking coffee and Virginia Rail is the Antioch intern at Breakthrough this semester. She is a nutrition major. BY VIRGINIA RALL- eating sweets every two hours in the teacher's lounge with my colleagues. Then, 13 years ago," she says, "someone handed me an Adele Davis book. I read it and changed my diet overnight from junk food to good food. Within two weeks I was walking down the hallways of my school and looking in the doorways wondering whether anyone else felt as good as I did." When she retired from teaching in 1975, she launched herself into a second career in nutrition. "I read everything I could about nutrition and medicine in medical and nutritional journals in the library." Eventually she went back to school and received two master's degrees ized and filled with all the vitamins and food supplements for her own diet: selenium, riboflavin, bioflavonoids, chromium, calcium-magnesium, pantothenic acid, and the alphabet of vitamins A — K. In 1977, Ruth Long began teaching her own nutrition classes in adult extension programs, churches, and the Houston Community College. "My first class had three students, my latest ones have had 70." Ever the educator, she founded the Nutritional Education Association, Inc, to meet her students' requests for copies of her talks. "I always spoke from one-word notes, I had to sit down and write these lectures into comprehensive books," she says. This food program is a way of life—not a crash diet to go on for a week, or a month, or a year. Good nutrition must be continued forever.M in nutrition—one from Texas Southern University and the other from the University of Texas School of Public Health. Her master's thesis on "Nutrition and Cancer" was later expanded into the subject for her doctoral thesis and several books on the subject, including Nutrition and Cancer and No More Cancer. Long believes the way to a correct diet is through natural foods and food supplements. "I feel that because of the processing and spraying that our food has been subjected to it is impossible for our bodies to maintain and regenerate perfect health with our vitamin and mineral supplements." Long is a woman who practices what she preaches. In her refrigerators—she has three—are bicycle baskets stuffed with bags of whole grain flours, dried beans, fruit preserves, nuts and her perishable staples. Fresh vegetables, milk, homemade yogurt, eggs and fruits line the inside door and shelves. No drinks, frozen dinners, packaged anything. Except for ice cream (her husband says it's his). Instead of a medicine chest filled with pills of aspirin* Dristan, or Alka-seltzer^ she has a fishing tackle box, neatly organ- Within the framework of the association, she rewrote her lessons into 13 units. They have become a home study course in nutrition, covering areas such as: basic diet plan; vitamins and minerals; stress, depression, and mental problems; specialized health problems—heart disease, allergies, arthritis, low and high blood sugar, and cancer; weight control; and hyperactivity, slow learning, and learning disabilities in children. Throughout these books/lessons lies a theme of prevention and therapy. In her words, "The body, if given a chance, will heal itself." She stresses, "This food program is a way of life—not a crash diet to go on for a week, or a month, or a year. Good nutrition, which includes food and food supplements, must be continued forever. You will recover from most every ailment with this food program. But if we eat this way for awhile, feel better, then go back to the average American diet we'll get sick again, because it is the average American diet of processed and refined food that caused our illness in the first place." A change in lifestyle and certainly a change in outlook must accompany the 22 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH