Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Page 21
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 21. November 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 21. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3672

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 21, November 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 21
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_565s.jpg
Transcript Texas is divided into 14 geographic areas, or districts. Each district has a Court of Civil Appeals. Two courts, District 1 and District 14, serve Harris and adjoining counties. Each court has one Chief Justice and five Associate Justices. Their salaries are $50,700 and $50,200 respectively. The 14 Districts set up for the courts of civil appeal are not the same as judicial districts. The geographic boundaries of our judicial district coordinate with Harris County. There are 48 district courts serving Harris County, 18 criminal district courts, 18 civil district courts, and 12 family district courts, nine family and three juvenile. Criminal district courts hear felony cases, crimes for which the punishment ranges from two years and a $5,000 fine up to a maximum of capital punishment. There are over 17,000 felony cases expected to come through the 18 district courts this year. Approximately 90 percent of those cases will be disposed of through the controversial system of plea bargaining. Civil district courts handle disputes where the amount of money in question is $500 or more. District judges earn $54,700 a year and are elected for a four- year term. There are eight contested judicial district races. Alice A. Bonner (D), named "worst civil judge" by Houston City magazine, is being opposed by Jerry McAfee (R). "He's worse," is a standard remark from attorneys asked about this race. One woman attorney expressed her feelings this way, "It's a hard race to say much about. A lot of people can't go either way. There are complaints about Judge Bonner, but her opposition is also inadequate. At least Bonner is sympathetic to women and minorities, if you show her the law. We don't often have the opportunity to have leanings in the direction of women and blacks. In the majority of courts the prejudice goes the other way. There are complaints that Bonner doesn't know the law, but she knows more about civil law than Zimmerman does of family law." People never run out of nice things to say about Miron A. Love (D), Judge, 177th Judicial District, running against John A. Woodard, Jr. (R). "He is a prince among men," gushes one attorney. The only rumblings about Love come from the prosecutors who timidly call him "soft." Love's admirers retort, "He leans toward the defense. That's the way the law is supposed to be." County judges earn $59,900, which makes them the best paid justices in the state, with the worst reputations. "I don't expect much of county court," an attorney said recently, "I try to get a client in and out of there without too much trouble." There are 10 criminal and four civil county courts. The county civil courts hear cases involving amounts from $200 to $5,000. County criminal courts have primary jurisdiction in all criminal actions of a misdemeanor nature, where punishment ranges from a $200 fine to a maximum of one year in jail, a $2,000 fine, or both. These are cases such as theft under $200, assault, driving while intoxicated, carrying weapons, possession of small amounts of marijuana, prostitution, and promotion of pornography. Thirty-four thousand cases went through nine criminal courts last year. Compared to the district courts, that's twice as many cases in half as many courts. The 10th criminal court was created January 1, 1980. The bench is being sought by incumbent Pat Lykos (R) and Carroll Weaver (D). Judge Lykos, a former policewoman, was rated number one by the Houston Post for time spent on the bench. Lykos stresses that she is an innovative judge, ordering testing, therapy, and restitution more than any other judge. As proof of what she terms her "fairness and impartiality," Lykos points to her endorsements by both the Gay Political Caucus and the Houston Police Officers Association. Lykos has refused to follow in the tradition of strong-arming attorneys into supporting the incumbent. "I am not actively soliciting support from attorneys. There is an inordinate amount of pressure on attorneys and I think it's horrible and unethical and I don't intend to indulge in it." Carroll Weaver, a criminal trial lawyer with 27 years experience, does not believe Lykos to be as innovative as she claims and feels the public would not approve of the cost of ordering therapy and testing for misdemeanors. Weaver feels, "Ninety percent of the cases go down by plea-bargaining. A judge and the citizens ought to look to the District Attorney to be innovative in the reaching of plea-bargaining agreements." Justice Courts Justice courts are the lowest level courts in the county. There are eight Justice court precincts in Harris County and each precinct has two Justices of the Peace. Each justice is elected for a four-year term by voters of the precinct. A JP is not required to be a licensed attorney, so in Precinct 1 incumbent Judge Kenneth M. Pacetti (D) is running against Republican restaurant owner Z. Z. Zamora. JP's do much more than marry people. They have jurisdiction over misdemeanors with fines up to $200 and in all civil cases where the amount involved is $1 to $500. But the most meaningful service they perform for the general public is presiding over small claims court. This court is the public's opportunity to take some individual or business to court and tell their story to the judge without the expense of hiring a lawyer. The $150 limit on small claims court cases ($200 in the case of wages) is the lowest in the nation. Larry Wilson (D) of Precinct 8 advocates increasing small claims court jurisdiction to $500. Once a voter knows the court system, how does he or she select the best candidate for each court? The men and women who work in the courts every day have some basic advice for voters. Look at a candidate's background and experience. A judge should have courtroom and bench experience appropriate to the court he or she is running for. If a candidate is a former prosecutor, he or she may tend to favor the state. "They get an attitude that everyone is guilty," sniffs one defense attorney. General community involvement is also considered important for knowledge of community services and for an understanding of the varied backgrounds of the individuals who appear before a judge. Talk to the candidates. Ferret out a candidate's prejudices by asking his or her opinions on issues close to your heart, like the ERA or the right to choose abortion. "Don't look at the party, look at the person," advises one attorney. Check out organizations such as the Women's Political Caucus, the Gay Political Caucus, the Houston Police Officers Association, or the Association of Women Attorneys and see who they are supporting, and why. You'll be able to go to the polls as an informed and intelligent voter. MICKEY LELAND for CONGRESS FRED DAILEY for DISTRICT ATTORNEY urge you to JOIN HANDS with a WINNING TEAM! Vote a straight ticket! Pull the big lever and vote * DEMOCRATIC * Tuesday, November 4th! Paid for by Mickey Leland for Congress; 3333 Fannin, Suite 203; Arlington McRae, Treasurer. NOVEMBER 1980 21