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Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Page 19
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 19. November 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3670.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 19. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3670

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 19, November 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3670.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 19
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_565q.jpg
Transcript standards. Then this fellow Mike Driscoll decided to contest the time-honored Hand-down of office from incumbent to picked successor and knocked off Sheppard in the Democratic primaries. After all this, the usual round of floods out in the county, encephalitis, SLE, freeway plans and problems, and the population explosion in Harris seem anticlimatic. The County Attorney's race is not over, though, not yet. The Republicans are flexing their muscles, a county judge has thrown his political (and possibly legal) future into the balance, and the scandal-smeared American Conservative Union has struck at Driscoll. Driscoll is in fact catching it high and low. Judge Lindsay, whose aide, Ron Dear, opposes Driscoll, has been sending out letters of recommendation for his largely-unknown protege; and Dear, for his part, is baiting his opponent with charges of ultra-liberalism or far-left leanings. Far-left leanings being difficult for many voters to discern, Dear, a former Young Americans for Freedom activist, allegedly circulated materials accusing Driscoll of being (1) a hippy from the Montrose ("a minister in the First Universal Life Church of Houston") and (2) a gay-hating straight. Whether Dear was personally responsible for these and a series of other petty dirty tricks, enough people were offended to begin a Republicans for Driscoll group, chaired by Wes Gilbreath and peopled with many former professional colleagues of the former justice of the peace, judge and trial lawyer. Dear has made a point in his campaign of identifying Driscoll with his famous great-uncle Ralph Yarbrough. Driscoll thinks that the name-calling and attempted guilt-inducing innuendos distract from the real issues of the county race. On the general points of performance and experience, Driscoll statistically outdistances Dear; having held three public offices with satisfactory records as well as gaining varied legal experience in his law office and simply by being in the places he was supposed to at any given time. Dear has an unfortunate average of .333 for recent work attendance. He explains one two-months stint off, with nearly $6,000 in pay, to back problems which prevented his attention to county affairs. Dear's experience includes aide work for Republican legislator Ron Paul, for Lindsay and directing the lobbying for the American Conservative Union in Washington. He is not and never has been a practicing attorney, but he dismisses the importance of this experience: "Administration, administrative efficiency, is what the county attorney's office needs," he says. "I have needed experience in that area, while my opponent does not." The Urban County Driscoll, aside from the questions of qualifications, presents a comprehensive picture of Harris County's government. The county must deal now with what were once thought city problems. Four out of five housing starts are now in the county," Driscoll points out, "and the county government is no longer that agency that the city tells to 'go clean out the ditches and fix some roads while we take care of everything else.' " The county budget is larger than that of several developing nations, its employees would make a respectable army for Uruguay, for example, or Guatemala. Its influence and power are growing. The city is now realizing, Driscoll points out, that "what the county does the city is going to have to live with." The county itself is urbanized. It has 29 principalities in it—Pasadena alone is the sixth largest city in Texas. All these areas look toward the county for help. The urbanization of the county puts a lot of pressure on the county for interpretation and enforcement of laws. The county attorney issues interpretations and outlines the legal parameters for county government. Ron Dear thinks the county's law firm, consisting of 30 lawyers and administrators, needs overall direction and guidance, more than any changed work habits or direction. He would hire two administrators, he says, to guide the office. Driscoll responds: "Here you have a man, whose only experience is administrating hiring two more adminstrators—administrators beget administrators." DriscoM says the county is going in the future to need "creative legal advice." That comes back to his legal experience, as well as his duties in private practice: "You have to know what the xeroxing costs, what the bills are, how to give your clients prompt service—time the county wastes is certainly tax money spent. Being a good advisor is another way of saving money. "I've found," says Driscoll, "that legal red tape has held up several county projects up to 18 months. This not only denies people in the county some service; an 18-month delay can double the cost." Mud Dear and Driscoll differ sharply on the issue of partisan politics. Dear says that there are clear, political choices to be made in the direction that county development will move. Driscoll thinks that a non-partisan approach is the best: "I am trying to work for all groups, because the majority agrees they want efficiency in in the office. I think I will function in a way that will please the developers who have endorsed me as well as the human rights groups." In the letter that Judge Lindsay sent out attacking Driscoll, the judge calls the endorsements of Driscoll "a veritable list of the radical leftist elements" in Houston. The letter says "Ron Dear says no the the AFL-CIO endorsement . . . Ron Dear says no to the Women's Political Caucus ... to the Gay Political Caucus." Driscoll says that he thinks these groups and certainly developers and Republicans who have endorsed him are not "radical leftist" but represent major constituencies whom he can help. The judge's attacks on him he takes philosophically, as a familiar attempt at empire-building. "Such attacks merely confuse the public," he says. "Ron Dear says, for example, that he is against busing and I am not— the County Attorney has as little to do with busing as he does with a Russian wheat deal." The dirty tricks, says Driscoll, is the usual Young Americans for Freedom canned campaign. "The Dear publicity is generated by a New Jersey firm and most of his contributions have come from out- of-state," he explains. This campaign method includes smears, which the candidate publicly denies but privately funds, plus the endorsement of the most respectable right-wingers available. Substituting for real issues are appeals to emotionally- charged current events, such as busing. "Even Dear's fund-solicitation letter doesn't talk about qualifications," says Driscoll, "it talks about Driscoll." "We're the fastest growing political entity in the nation," concludes Driscoll. "We need more efficiency, clearly, and I, sitting with the Commissioners working closely with them and stressing efficiency of my staff, can save money and, at the same time, remain sensitive to the needs of people in the county." Dear promises efficiency: "Administration is needed and I'm an administrator. Judge Will Garwood Dear Texas Voters: My good friend, Judge Will Garwood, is seeking his first elective term on the Texas Supreme Court. He is striving to run a non-partisan campaign, as he should, and has attracted a wide range of Democrats, Republicans and independents behind him simply because he is the kind of person we need on our highest courts. His 82% victory in the statewide Bar poll is clear evidence that attorneys respect his ability and deem him to be better qualified for the Supreme Court. Will ranked first in his class every year in law school; he has broad experience as a lawyer in private practice; he is by nature a compassionate person, always ready to help others; above all, he is eminently fair and judicious. For these reasons I commend Will Garwood to you. We are fortunate to have him serving on the Supreme Court and should elect him on November 4. Sincerely, Frances T. Farenthold Look for the name Garwood on the ballot. It's worth the effort. Pol. Adv. paid for by Texans forjudge Will Garwood, a Nonpartisan Committee: Duncan Osborne. Treasurer; 121 East 8ih, Suite 318, Austin, Texas 78701. KEEP JUDGE. COUNTY CRIMINAL COURT 10 Judge Pat Lykos of Harris County Criminal Court No. 10 is the only judge with criminal justice experience as a Houston police officer . . . a criminal justice planner ... a trial lawyer . . . and a criminal court judge. She's hardworking, firm and fair. ENDORSEMENTS FOR JUDGE PAT LYKOS HE GAY POLTICAL CAUCUS THE HOUSTON POLICE OFFICER'S ASSOCIATION THE HARRIS COUNTY WOMEN'S POLITICAL CAUCUS THE ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN ATTORNEYS NOVEMBER 1980 19