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Houston Breakthrough, November 1980
Page 15
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Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 15. November 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 25, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3666.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1980). Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3666

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 15, November 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 25, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3666.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, November 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
File name femin_201109_565m.jpg
Transcript busing, a strong national defense, and fighting inflation. He is outspoken in hi* scorn for homosexuals and has produced what he calls "Truth Papers" about Eckhardt's record, which his campaign has bent if not entirely distorted. A member of Humble Baptist Church, he has strongly identified with fundamentalist religion and recently was scheduled to give a sermon at a north Houston church which is one of the local organizers for a Moral Majority committee. So far, however, the campaign has ventured little beyond the District 8 boundaries, largely because Fields has refused to debate or hold a public forum outside the district. For a while, it seemed as though Eckhardt was defusing Field's candidacy by focusing on the "debate-or-not-to-de- bate" issue. More recently, the Eckhardt- Fields campaign has turned to a letter which Eckhardt maintains was planted at the Fields' headquarters and sent by the Fields' people to area newspapers to further discredit Eckhardt's record. "This was a scurrilous and amateurish trick . . . not even worthy of Nixon," fumed Eckhardt to the Houston Post. (The letter and a five dollar contribution from a conservative campaign worker in Arlington, Va., were addressed to Eckhardt but sent to Fields' campaign headquarters, opened by the staff, and released to the press. (The letter said in part: "I for one am glad you support school busing and gun control . . . most of all I (sic) glad you have fought to keep prayers out of our schools." Eckhardt released a statement in which he said, "The writer states that he supports positions that are obnoxious to me, positions taken right out of Fields' lying propoganda.)" However, Fields' main contention is that Eckhardt has lost touch with his district, Eckhardt believes that District 8 is fundamentally Democratic and is popu- latea by the common people he so eloquently defends. Fields says the district is changing, becoming more white collar and middle class. Maybe so. But, losing Eckhardt's voice in Congress could affect a lot more people of District 8. As one GOP precinct chair there admitted: "Eckhardt knows how to get things done." PAUL/ANDREWS RACE Republican incumbent Ron Paul of District 22 is something else again. After three years in the U. S. House, he was rated by Jack Anderson in the same Washingtonian article as one of the "dim bulbs" in the House worthy of the "Low Wattage" Award. Even Texas Business magazine rated Paul the "Worst Conservative" representing Texas in Congress. A gynecologist from Lake Jackson, Paul was first elected in a special election in April 1976 to fill the seat of Democrat Rep. Bob Casey, who resigned after 17 years in the House to become a member of the Federal Maritime Commission. Later the same year, he was defeated by former state representative Democrat Bob Gammage by a mere 268 votes. Paul defeated Gammage once again in 1978 by about 1,000 votes. Paul's stands on issues have been called everything from eccentric to irresponsible. He regularly opposes almost all forms of federal aid. That has included $74 million in federal funds for Freeport Harbor improvements in his district, federal flood insurance for his district which has suffered heavy flooding in recent years, and federal funds for research at NASA and the Texas Medical Center in his district. As a result of his effort, he was named the "Taxpayer's Best Friend" by the National Taxpayers Union. He also believes the draft is unconsti tutional, even in wartime, and has held a military isolationists' philosophy calling for the withdrawal of American troops from foreign soil. He opposes the development of most new military weapons. Next to Paul, Democrat Mike Andrews seems peculiarly militaristic. Son of a U. S. Army officer, Andrews grew up in Ft. Worth, attended UT at Austin, graduated in 1970 with a law degree from SMU, and later clerked in Houston for U. S. District Judge Allan B. Hannay. He was prosecutor with the Special Crimes Division of the Harris County District Attorney's office before he joined the Houston law firm of Baker, Brown, Shar- man, Wise and Stephens. In a surprise victory, Andrews defeated Gammage in the Democratic Party primary last May for the District 22 nomination. Reportedly, Andrews spent $250,000 on his primary campaign, helped by professionals like Victor Emmanuel, Dick Tra- bulsi, and media consultant Bob Heller. As a conservative Democrat, Andrews has attacked Paul for his military isolationism, opposition to federal flood insurance and cut-back of federal research funds. However, like Paul, he says he's against over-regulation, big spending and congressional excesses. Like the Eckhardt-Fields campaign, the Andrews-Paul race is well financed. Andrews has spent a total of $374,778 (including the primary) and Paul has spent $362,948. Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen and former Rep. Bob Casey have both campaigned for Andrews, while Eddie Chiles has appeared on behalf of Paul's campaign. A third candidate for the District 22 race is independent Vaudie V. Nance. Less controversial are two more congressional races scheduled for the Nov. 4 election. Democrat Mickey Leland is seeking re-election to Houston's inner city District 18, opposed by Republican C. L. Kennedy and Libertarian Party candidate Bill Fraser. Incumbent Republican Bill Archer is seeking his fifth term from District 7, the west Harris County district once represented by George Bush. He is opposed by Democrat Robert L. Hutchings and Libertarian Bill Ware. Incumbent Democrat Jack Brooks from District 9 in northeast Harris County is unopposed. Freeing Up The System "Sometimes it is said that a man cannot be trusted with the government of himself. Can he, then, be trusted with the government of others?" - Thomas Jefferson We live in a world beset with serious solve our own problems in voluntary problems. cooperation with other people. The crime rate is soaring. The government educational system is failing many of our children. Our personal liberties are often violated or ignored. Taxes go up and up. Inflation. Recession. Unemployment. And when elections draw near politicians routinely promise us that government will solve our problems. But they consistently fail to deliver. In fact, the plethora of new laws and regulations which they regularly impose upon us not only fails to solve our problems, it usually makes them worse. DISILLUSIONMENT The terrible result of this endless cycle of political promise and failure is a widespread disillusionment and a lack of confidence in the future. This sad legacy is reflected in the steady erosion of support for the "two- party system" during the last 30 years. Today less than half of the American electorate identifies with the Democratic and Republican parties. Millions of Americans have recognized the truth of that popular civic exhortation: "It doesn't matter who you vote for, just as long as you vote." And so they stopped voting. And the politicians complain of apathy. But the real problem, I believe, goes much deeper. For the first time in our history we are becoming a people without hope. We are losing a sense of control over our lives. We are losing our freedom to THE LIBERTARIANS It was into this political vacuum that the Libertarian Party was born just eight years ago. And the Libertarian alternative, based on the principle of individual liberty which was the genesis of the American Revolution, has grown steadily and strongly. In 1972 Libertarian vice-presidential candidate Tonie Nathan became the first woman in American history to receive an electoral vote. In the 1976 Presidential election the Libertarian Party became America's third largest party. In 1978 Libertarian candidates received over 1.3 million votes across the country. In 1980 for the first time in American history a new political party has overcome restrictive ballot access laws to place its candidates-over 500 through out the country-on the official ballot of all fifty states and the District of Columbia. Today we are at a critical point in our history when we must choose between individual liberty and government power, between hope and despair. And the Libertarian alternative offers a politics of hope because it honors freedom and independence and peace and cooperation. 34% Here in Senate District 15 the voters have a choice of three candidates. But a vote cast for either of the candidates of the two "major" parties is a vote for the status quo, a vote of approval for the myriad of problems which is the legacy of those two parties. Only the election of a Libertarian will give District 15 a unique voice for freedom in Austin. Can a Libertarian be elected? With three candidates in the race a plurality is sufficient for election. That means the next senator from District 15 could be elected with as little as 34% of the vote! In Alaska in 1978 the Libertarian Party elected its first state representative in a partisan race. He was elected from a multi-candidate field with 36% of the vote. And that one Libertarian in a state house of 40 members became the legislative catalyst for the entire state. With your help that could happen in the 31-member Texas Senate also. I invite you to join with me in voting to free up the system on November 4. ALLAN VOGEL SENATE 15 Political advertising paid for by the Allan Vogel Campaign. P. O. Box 25043. Houston. Texas 77005. 961-2812. Richard Sansmg. Treasurer NOVEMBER 1980 15