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Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Page 14
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 14. November 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3665

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 14, November 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_565l.jpg
Transcript • • CAMPAIGN '80 1 .CONGRESSIONAL A CLOSE RACE Republicans are putting "every dollar the law will allow" against Eckhardt. 'BY CHARLOTTE MOSER' The two hottest U. S. congressional races in Houston these days are being waged in districts described frequently as "increasingly Republican." In the case of U.S. Congressional District 8 in north and east Harris County, that means a tough fight for 14-year incumbent liberal Democrat Bob Eckhardt. In what has been called the "dirtiest" campaign of his career, Eckhardt is battling GOP-groomed conservative candidate Jack Fields, 29, in his first political race. But, in U. S. Congressional District 22 in south and southeast Harris County, the tables ironically are turned. Two-term conservative Republican Ron Paul has made such an eccentric mark in office that newcomer conservative Democrat Mike Andrews is edging into Paul's shaky incumbency. The outcome of these races will have a long-term impact beyond the individual effectiveness of the winning congressman. With re-districting scheduled for Texas in 1981 in accordance with the 1980 census, the winners would chisel out favorable districts that could keep them in office for another decade until the next census. If conservatives win the elections, the balance of congressional representation in the Houston area could shift in the wake of the right wing tide behind GOP presidential candidate Ronald Reagan, now predicted to take 46 percent of Harris County. "Houston should have five congressional districts. The real question is which party will have three and which one will have two," says Richard Murray, UH political science professor. "If the Republicans win, they would enter a Congress where the Democrats are the majority party. That would mean Houston would get decreased federal support." The most serious threat to Houston's liberal voice in the U. S. House is the current campaign to unseat Eckhardt, now 62, in District 8. Long an anomaly froYi this blue-collar, red-neck district, Eckhardt is a liberal politician in the best Southern tradition who has skillfully waged staggering campaigns against the oil industry and big business during his 14 years in office. A 1979 New York Times editorial said Eckhardt was "noted for his intellect and legislative skill." He is a skillful Con- stitutionist. Great grandson of Germans who immigrated to Texas in 1848, he is Charlotte Moser is editor of north Houston's The Leader newspapers. the fourth member of his family to make it to Congress. A graduate of University of Texas Law School, he served in the Texas Legislature for eight years before winning his first congressional race in 1966. Never has Eckhardt's legislative skill been put more to a test than in the last five years. While District 8 has increasingly acquired the aura of oil industry mega- bucks, Eckhardt has increasingly been identified with consumer interests. (With an 83 percent rating, Eckhardt is the Texas delegate with the highest marks from Ralph Nader's consumer protection people). In 1975, he wrote the price-control amendment to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. In 1976, he authored the landmark legislation for the Toxic Substance Control Act that required pollution clean-up from the Exxon, Shell, and Arco plants within his own district. He supported windfall profits legislation in 1979 and, most recently, has attacked Texas' Public Utilities Commission for waffling on its control of the South Texas nuclear energy project. That Eckhardt has continued in office despite his strong stands has earned professional respect for him among friends and foes alike. Washington Post political columnist Jack Anderson recently rated Eckhardt among the 10 most effective members of the House in a recent issue of The Washingtonian magazine. Texas' conservative magazine Texas Business called him the state's "best liberal" whom even conservatives would miss if he were to leave Congress. Until this year, however, Eckhardt's liberal stand has provoked passionate, but limited, conservative opposition. In his first five campaigns, his opponents never raised more than $40,000 according to a recent New York Times article entitled "A Texan vs. Big Oil." In 1978, Eckhardt even received $32,756 from the oil and gas industry (putting him among the top 10 congressmen who had received the most from the industry) before he finally voted for decontrol of natural gas in 1978. Such funds brought him a 62 percent defeat of Republican Nick Gearhart in 1976 and a 60 percent defeat of Gearhart in 1978. However, Eckhardt's campaign this year, for which $250,000 is budgeted, is different. Targeted by the National Republican Congressional Committee as one of the most "vulnerable" Democratic Congressmen in the nation, Eckhardt is being criticized in a heavy media campaign for "losing touch with his district." "I don't know of any more worthwhile endeavor that anyone can undertake than to unseat Bob Eckhardt," said former Texas governor John Connally at a press conference. Rep. Guy Vander Jagt, chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee, says the party is throwing "every dollar the law will allow" against Eckhardt. No one really knows how Jack Fields came along to be the great conservative hope. Born and raised in Humble, Fields, 29, was apparently never involved in politics until he announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for the District 8 seat almost two years ago. He was president of the Humble High School student body and captain of the football team. He says he worked his way through high school and Baylor University (where he was also president of the student body) selling burial plotsfor the family business, the 185-acre cemetery Rosewood Memorial Park. He graduated from Baylor Law School in 1977 and returned to Humble to set up a law practice. There,he met his wife-to-be Roni Sue, now 22. "God just told me that this was the girl I was going to marry," says the ever-earnest Fields. A year later, he gave up his law practice, assumed the vice-presidency of the family cemetery and began a two-year campaign to defeat Bob Eckhardt. Along the way, Fields put together a campaign remarkably well-organized for a first race. Early on, his campaign — with Houston's Robert Allen of Gulf Resources and Chemical Corp. as finance chair —was picked as a priority campaign by the National Republican Congressional Committee because of its smooth operation. Campaign fund-raisers set a budgeted goal of $600,000 of which almost a half- million dollars was raised by early October, making it the best-funded congressional campaign in Texas' history, according to the Houston Post. (Eckhardt's 1978 opponent was able to raise only $40,000.) National GOP celebrities like former President Gerald Ford and Eddie "I'm Mad Too" Chiles were sent to Houston to campaign for Fields. Fields and his campaign staff of 11 full-time members have the scrubbed, flawless image of young conservatives. Fields himself participated in the GOP's candidate training school, the National Congressional Council in Washington, D. C, where he learned campaign techniques, fund-raising and briefing on issues. His campaign manager Jerry Linds- ley, 25, was executive director of the College Republican National Committee in Washington, D. C, and his press director Brian Wirwicz, from North Carolina, formerly worked with the National Conservative Political Action Committee, one of many right-wing "action committees" which have sprouted to work for conservative candidates. Fields has come down on Eckhardt's liberal voting record and extolled the virtues of prayer in school, voluntary school Fourteen-year Democratic incumbent Bob Eckhardt faces a tough race against a GOP newcomer. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH