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Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Page 9
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Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 9. November 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3660.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3660

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 9, November 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3660.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_565g.jpg
Transcript campaign conducted by the Los Angeles Times saved the lives of an entire Argentine family. And I myself would not be free now had not the foreign press — the U. S. press, in particular — kept up a steady barrage of coverage about my plight." Gandhi, he's a man with a mystique." He said he had not seen Esquivel in two years, but had heard that he was very badly tortured. "They destroyed his genitals with electric shocks," he said. It was painful to listen to such details, especially from one so restrained and "The press can do more rights than the pope, Amnesty International." in the struggle for human the United Nations and Of course, American journalists are not personally obliged to face the choices that Timerman had to face. "It was a matter I was led to understand," he wrote, "only because I was forced to live it through, because I had to decide which of two attitudes to adopt . . ." He chose to speak out, knowing the risks. He then suffered the consequences. Journalists who speak out in this country do not suffer such consequences. "You can be independent here," said Timerman, "but in a country like Argentina you are alone. An independent journ- list has the law with him in a democracy. Where there is no law you have nothing." Questions at the press conference kept coming back to the theme of torture. "I'm not an expert on torture," said Timerman, "I'm an expert on being tortured." At one point he laughed: "It is unbelievable for the American people! Everything is unbelievable for the American people. Hitler was unbelievable." But how did he react to the horror of being tortured? "It is very personal," he replied. "You don't know how you react under torture. There is no escape. Many people go mad, commit suicide. But if you are sure of your place in the world . . . you can go on." He told of the time that Eli Wiesel, survivor of Auschwitz and author of several books on the Holocaust, visited him. They talked of torture. Wiesel said, "I would commit suicide." Timerman replied, "But you, you were in Auschwitz! You saw your father go to the crematorium. I think that's worse than torture." In a country of indiscriminate violations of human rights, Argentine Jews are particular targets, said Timerman: "Fascists always try to show that Jews are trying to take over." In semi-clandestine prisons, he explained that the prisoners are allowed to walk Tor one hour a day. "But," he said, "Jews had to go on all fours, barking like dogs." Timerman was living in Israel earlier this year when two Left Bank Arab mayors were maimed by Israeli terrorists. He protested the harassment of Arabs, saying: "We should go into the streets and say we are all Arabs," as the king of Denmark did for Jews during World War II. Conditions are slowly improving in Argentina, Timerman feels. The labor unions are stronger and he thinks human rights organizations will be stronger. The fact that Adolfo Perez Esquivel, an Argentine, has just been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize should focus more international attention on that country. When asked if he knew Esquivel, Timerman laughed: "I think I'm the only one who knows him." (Esquivel taught two of Timerman's sons.) "He's like NOVEMBER 1980 courteous. To actually experience them is beyond the comprehension of most of us in this country. (I had a friend in England, a Latvian, who vomited whenever he saw carrots. As a child, he had seen his parents killed by Russians. He and his brothers stayed on their farm for a year afterwards subsisting on carrots.) A list of 167 names of journalists who have been imprisoned, killed or "disappeared" in Latin America in recent years appeared with Timerman's story in the CJR. Adam Horschild, writing about South Africa in Mother Jones (November 1980), said he spent several months there in 1962, working for an anti-apartheid newspaper. "It was the political turning point of my life," he wrote. "I began to grasp that, in most of the world, commitment to one's beliefs brings far more serious consequences than it does in the United States." Four Russian feminist exiles gave an exclusive interview to Robin Morgan (Ms. November 1980.) They asked, "most of all'" that American women write them the personal stories of their lives so that they might share this "stereotype-breaking information" with Russian women. Said one of them, Yuliya Voznesenskaya: "The simple story of any American woman would be useful in our magazine. Then Russian women could see how, in reality, women in the West live." It repeats itself — Russia, South Africa or Argentina. The freedom of expression we enjoy in this country, the freedom of journalists to write what they wish, carries with it an obligation to all those who are deprived of that freedom. As Timerman wrote: "... when some newspapers reported on our situation in distant places of this world, be it a small town or a large city, this news reached us by that miracle of communication which political prisoners the world over have managed to establish. And it helped us to live through that day; not to give up in the face of filth, starvation and despair; to reject suicide. A small piece of information published in San Diego or Quebec, in Edinburgh or Naples, in Tel Aviv or Costa Rica, lifted, if only briefly, the burden of that worst of all punishments: loneliness. The awareness that there was someone out there who, for a moment of his or her life, cared about us saved many lives. "And only journalism could do it." We've got plenty of strong reasons to keep Gene Jones in the State Senate. Look around the Texas legislature. You won't find a better record of true public service. Since 1973, Gene Jones has consistently authored and advocated legislation to help people. Gene Jones played an active role in the 78 special session to eliminate the sales tax on utility bills and to expand exemptions on inheritance taxes. In the regular session last year, the Senator helped revise the homestead property tax law which saved taxpayers $1 billion. Next session, he'll be out front in the Senate pressing for tighter budgets and further tax relief for the people of Texas. GENE JONES for STATE SENATOR Let's work hard to keep Gene Jones in the State Senate. He's the best friend we have in Austin. Political advertising paid for by Gene Jones Campaign, Gloria Jones, chair.