Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Page 8
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 8. November 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3659.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1980). Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3659

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1980-11 - Page 8, November 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3659.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1980-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_565f.jpg
Transcript UNIVERSITY OF ST.THOMAS 3812 Montrose Boulevard Houston, Texas 77006 522-7911, ext. 200 SPRING 1981 Apply Now Private, independent co-educational, liberal arts Registration January 12-14 Day, Night, Full-time, Part-time 25 areas of undergraduate study Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Business Administration Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Science in Nursing Master of Business Administration Master of Education Master of Divinity Master of Religious Education Master of Theological Studies Master of Arts (Philosophy) Semester in Rome NASA Cooperative Program Army/Navy ROTC cross-enrollment International Institutes Seminar Extended Education Program Traditional courses at non-traditional hours Courses a la Carte Special interest non-credit courses Financial Aid Available The University of St. Thomas provides equal educational opportunities without regard to handicap, race, color, sex and national or ethnic origin Serving the Greater Houston Community With Quality... LEISURE LEARNING UNLIMITED No Matter What's Your Bac Business, Cooking, Dance, Drama, Art, Music, Languages, Sports of all sorts, Women's issues, Personal Development... I In our current schedule, which youl lean receive by calling 721-7299,] I we offer a wide variety of classes. I Some classes are free and registra-| Ition is easy. UIML JAO t :<§ TIMERMAN Coverage of human-rights violations is a journalistic obligation. Since this is election time, I had planned to write a column on the media coverage of the presidential candidates: the home stretch of the horse race, Tweedle-dum and Tweedle-dee, a vote for Anderson is a vote for Anderson, the Moral Majority and the lesser of two evils, non- debates and non-issues, Commoner's "Bullshit" and all the obscenities of this venal campaign. But on October 16 I met Jacobo Timerman. I prefer to write about him. A special relationship exists between journalism and human rights," wrote Jacobo Timer- man, former publisher and editor of the Argentine daily La Opinon, in the Columbia Journalism Review (May/ June 1980). Timerman has personal experience of that relationship: "... first as an editor of a newspaper engaged in the human rights struggle under a military dictatorship, then as a prisoner subjected to torture by that same government." For 30 months - from April 1977 through September 1979 — Timerman was held captive by the Argentine army. He spent a year in various prisons, although he was never charged with any crime nor brought to trial, and then 18 months under strict house arrest. Last October, he was stripped of his citizenship and expelled from the country. He now lives in Israel. Timerman came to Houston, October 16, at the invitation of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, to speak at the Jewish Community Center. At a small press conference that afternoon, he told of his experiences. For the first 40 days of his imprisonment, he was tortured and interrogated. Speaking in a soft, almost reticent voice, he described the torture as "a very unusual experience." I was struck by the awful chasm between the two realities of experience — to be sitting in the dingy gentility of the Houston Press Club (I brushed two roaches from my chair during the interview) while this 57-year-old man in a business suit described his "unusual experience": how he was repeatedly stripped naked, bound, doused with water and subjected to electric shocks for pursuing his profession as a journalist. According to Amnesty International, up to 20,000 people have 'disappeared' in Argentina in the four years of the Videla regime. Timerman regularly published the names of the desaparecidos in his newspaper, and condemned acts of terrorism. His home was bombed by extremists. Both the right and the left wanted him dead, leaving him to ask: "Which side will get my body?" Why did he not flee before his arrest? asked one reporter. (Timerman knew several hours beforehand that he would be arrested: "You don't spend 30 years as a journalist without developing sources — I had friends among the military.") "Because I am a Jew," he replied. "Because of the humiliation that Jews have suffered. I say no, enough, I stay. You want to live with dignity." BY GABRIELLE COSGRIFF. Timerman credited the press with saving his life and securing his release. His family was able to organize a network of information while he was in jail. He wrote in the CJR: "Each time the Buenos Aires Herald — the outspoken English-language daily — published an article about my situation, my wife and children distributed copies to the international news agencies and to foreign correspondents. They also telexed these articles to papers throughout the world." His wife also had Argentine journalists write articles, under a pseudonym, for publication in foreign newspapers. Co- There are committees: The Committee of Mothers of Missing Journalists, The Committee of Mothers of Missing Soldiers, The Committee of Grandparents of Missing Grandchildren . . . Then there are the Mad Mothers of Plaza de Mayo. They meet every Thursday, explained Timerman, in front of Government House. They stand silently, holding placards with the names of their missing children. Sometimes a police car drives up, and two or three of the women are taken away. They "disappear." The Mad Mothers continue to meet, silently, every Thursday in front of the Government House. Former editor of an Argentine daily, Jacobo Timerman addresses reporters at the Houston Press Club. pies would then be distributed to international news agencies in Buenos Aires. "A few Argentine papers would always print a few lines," said Timerman. The army leaders and the government read all the clippings about Argentina from the foreign press. "It became clear to us," wrote Timerman, "that what appeared to be merely professional journalistic reporting compelled the government to become more concerned about establishing its 'legal' relationship with me. The government . . . could not accuse me of any crime because the international press had already laid bare the true nature of my situation: that I had been imprisoned and my paper closed down because I denounced all kinds of terrorism, whether carried out by the left or the right, the state or the individual; because La Opinion defended the right to life and to a legal trial of any arrested person and published lists of the thousands of abduction victims who were never heard of again." The families of the desaparecidos, said Timerman, not only have to bear their loss, but they have an added cruel burden in not knowing whether they are alive or dead. Timerman believes they are dead. "Their policy is extermination," he said. The message was starkly uncomfortably clear. It was obviously painful for Timerman to speak of his own, and his people's , humiliation and pain. But he reemphasi- zed to us what he wrote in the CJR: "The violation of human rights in the world has reached such levels of permanency, magnitude and sophistication that I, for one, cannot see how journalists can still regard the topic as a subtheme in political, social and diplomatic coverage. I believe it has become a theme, or beat, in itself. And in moral terms, coverage of it has become an obligation . . . The press can do more in the struggle for human rights than the pope, the United Nations and Amnesty International." Even in professional terms, wrote Timerman, coverage of human-rights violations deserves its own department, with no less commitment, space and specialization than the Bridge, Furniture or Food departments. "In my office as editor of La Opinion," he wrote, "I was able to save lives by covering human rights as thoroughly as sports, for instance." Timerman wrote that even a few lines in foreign publications had "immediate repercussions on our living conditions and treatment as prisoners. I witnessed how a HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH