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Houston Breakthrough, November 1980
Page 5
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Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 5. November 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3657.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1980). Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3657

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, November 1980 - Page 5, November 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3680/show/3657.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, November 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Texas
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
File Name femin_201109_565d.jpg
Transcript LOCAL COLOR MUNICIPAL MIRROR KPFT. Electronic Mind-control —You have to Lovett. BY MORRIS EDELSON KPFT: Marathon No Thermopylae Not too long ago, Tony Ullrich, popular programmer of the Bluegrass Express, walked off the air at KPFT on Lovett and out into the sunshine, claiming that the radio station had become "unsupport- able." Aside from the graffiti, the dirt, and people sleeping on the Pacifica couches and walking about in their underwear, Ullrich said he could not stand Manager Ray Hill's politically aggressive attitudes and identification of KPFT with a neighborhood listener survey. 'The results and the meanings were ambiguous," Glaser said, "so right now we still have a potpourri of eclectic programs with a direction unclear to me. It's a little wild, with radio for the hearing-impaired, a Chinese show in Chinese, drop-in and hosted talk shows, New Wave . . . personally, I am torn between what I can do here without money, and the constraints in another place, with money." Glaser explained that in any given week about 100 people might volunteer shows on topics of particular interest to women, and the Fleming-Saylors show is a magazine of literary and political reviews, with music and interviews of people in the news. During the marathon month of fund-raising, Saylors and Fleming were on the air (October 10) from 6:30 to midnight. Their weekly program resumes in November. Glaser said, "Women's programming tends to have its own special reservation on the station, but not to be integrated into the overall programming. Anything the marathon, locked themselves in the station and refused to let anyone else in. That went on for about two weeks, until the commercial media got around to covering the story and the funds came in." The controversial manager himself, Ray Hill, seems not only unworried by the rumbles of dissent and the problems of 24-hour month-long operation, but actually to be having a good time. He cheerfully admitted, "The marathon is off to a bad start. It's only getting about candidate Reagan's stand on the proposed amendment. They rallied in great numbers and. they will again on Sunday, November 2 at 2 pm in front of the City Hall Reflection Pool. the gay rights campaign. "The station needs to grow up," said Ullrich, "it has to change into the 1970's—it is still hippy, left-wing, and trying to shock people— and what the community wants and needs is a professional, community radio station. When it is ready to move toward that goal, I am ready to go back—I am eager to go back." Ullrich is not hostile to gays, he said, but to mixing the radio station in political fights—"a left-over attitude"—and to its "this is my treehouse" attitude. Margie Glaser, another long-time worker at the Pacifica station, sees the problem as "one of focus, direction. The idea of community broadcasting is subject to a number of different interpretations." 4? It's not that the station hasn't tried, she said. A few years ago KPFT even did for various tasks around the non-profit Pacifica station. Most of them are drawn by the chance to get, someday, on the air, and those who persist, do. "I have learned a tremendous amount here," Glaser said, "especially about the technical aspects of broadcasting. Pacifica fulfilled the idea of access to the public for me." She began as a subscriber, but after the right-wing bombing of the station's transmitter, became a volunteer and now is a programmer, with her show Focus on the Arts introducing listeners to new cultural developments and music in Houston. Glaser is one of only a few women programmers, a group including Karen Lee, with The Women's Room at 7 p.m. Tuesdays, and Nancy Fleming and Rita Saylors, who host Breakthrough on the Air 6:30 Wednesdays. The Lee program features panel discussions and call-in that is seen as being of interest to women goes into the women's programs. It's a patchwork programming." The patchwork is either a pleasing quilt of sound or unrelated pieces, depending on which insider of the station one listens to. Since February, most of the decisions have depended on Ray Hill. According to one commentator, it is "Hill and his circle of intimates who claim to be most in touch with the wider listening audience, about which there is much uncertainty." Glaser is inclined to be optimistic: "Things aren't as bad now as they have been in the past, not by a long shot. Just think about the bombing, which resulted in a great outpouring of concern and support. Then there was the 1977 lockout. Bob Rogers and 11 other people, since enough money had not come in during 25 percent of our planned response. This prompt money usually comes out for the special areas of programming, such as the reggae music, the women's shows and other specialized programs." Hill expects the marathon to meet its goal of half the year's expenses. (So far only $57,000 has been pledged—they need $125,000 by November 15.) Hill sees November a more successful and varied month: "We are adding an outdoor sports program next month, connected to an environmental program. Monday nights are going to have a Spanish character and Friday nights a black personality. Currently we are broadcasting in nine languages, including a gypsy dialect of Hungarian, Patois, Pakistani and an Indian dialect. We also speak Texan." The "unprofessionalism" of the station he also dismisses: "Pacifica itself is NOVEMBER 1980