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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Page 17
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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 17. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 2, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3586.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3586

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 17, October 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 2, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3586.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_521q.jpg
Transcript PRIESTS continued from page 1 Reverend Carter Heyward, one of those women, feels that the ordination wasn't simply an event, but part of a process- a process of renewal. Following the Philadelphia ordinations, four other women were ordained in separate ceremonies. Havens praised these "women of untold courage," and added, "I hope that history will acknowledge their courage and their genius." At the 1976 Convention, the House of Bishops voted to offer these 15 women priests conditional ordination. This would be, in effect, a re-ordination. Most, if not all, of the women have rejected this suggestion out of hand because they believe they are validly ordained priests. The Bishops later agreed to the possibility of a "public event" which would include "an opportunity" for the women to declare their loyalty to the Church "anew." It would not repeat laying on of hands. William Stringfellow, chief counsel for the 15 women priests, has said that this would be acceptable if all participants in the service repeated their vows, not only the 15 women. As part of a recent change in attitude, this triennial convention reflects the Episcopal Church's growing recognition of and respect for women in the Church. The ordination of women to the Deaconate was approved in 1970. In that year also women were accepted as delegates to conventions. In 1973, the question of women's o rdination was narrowly de- feated in a vote before the House of Deputies. This year, in a Celebration of the Eucharist at the General Convention, three women-two deacons, one of whom was Havens, and one lay delegate- participated in the Mass. The Archbishop of Canterbury and the Presiding Bishop were con- celebrants of the service in a display of unity in the Church. It is also significant that the resolution on women priests was admitted as canonical change, as opposed to a constitutional revision, which would have required final approval at the 1979 Convention. Although opponents fear a drastic breach in Catholic- Episcopal relations, the following message from the Women's (Ordination Conference, a Ro- man Catholic group, was read to the General Convention: "We rejoice with all our Episcopal brothers and sisters. Our joy is doubled knowing that, because of our ecumenical bond, this work of the Spirit in your Convention hastens the day when women will be ordained in our communion." \ These past six years have been tumultuous ones, arid great strides have been made in the acceptance of women in all areas of the Church. The Convention's decision leaves no winners or losers, but a victory for all men and women-clergy and lay—Reverend Fred Hannon, Church of the Resurrection explained The general feeling in Houston is one of hope and expectation. The Diocese of Texas delegates voted 7 — 1 in favor of the change, which will become effective January 1, 1977. Bishop J. Milton Richardson cast a yes vote. Reverend Jeffrey Walker, Christ Church, sees it as a "great step forward for the Church." Even those opposed to the decision accept, albeit painfully, the will of their Church. Reverend Thomas Bagby, St. Martin Church, agreed, but added, "I personally wouldn't care to have one on my staff." In the Texas diocese there are three women deacons. Neither Gladys Hall of Baytown nor Betty Fuller of La Grange seek the priesthood at this time. Havens hopes for ordination next summer. She feels that women can offer the priesthood a new dimension of feminine richness. And her son, Mark, can hardly wait to introduce her as 'My mother, Father Havens.' NURSES continued from page 1 The six nursing school deans, cognizant of the fact that they must now depend on the continued approval of their respective presidents to maintain their deanships, presented a neutral position paper. Testifying on behalf of the Regents, the newly-promoted Vice Chancellor E. Don Walker stated, "Our reorganization is working well . . . because of the willing cooperation and hard work of our nursing school deans." It was widely rumored that the deans met with Walker and the Regents the night before the September 9 hearing to prepare their position paper. Despite the original reason given by the Regents to dissolve the UTSSN-to save UT $300,000 - Walker never mentioned this fact in his testimony. Dr. Redding and Luci Johnson Nugent did speak to that issue. Redding pointed out the increased costs of the accreditations process-from $22,000 for the System to approximately $133,000 for six separate campus accreditations. Johnson testified that with the abolishment of the System came the abolishment of the Development Board which she formerly chaired. The Board raised approximately $500,000 annually. Walker also neglected to mention other evidence that was used to strengthen the Regents' case—a "Report on the UTSSN." In this so-called "two-year study," Walker and the Regents charged that UT nursing graduates were so ill- prepared "as bedside nurses" that they had to go "through at least six weeks of clinical training at UT hospitals (M.D. Anderson and Hermann) before they could be entrusted to attempt to take care of hospitalized sick people." Mildred Dayton challenged these assertions in her testimony. The Houston faculty professor quoted HelenSommer, Assistant Director of Education at M.D. Anderson, as saying that the hospital never conducted clinical training programs specifically for UT graduates. "What they did have," Dayton refuted "were orientation programs attended by all nurses new to M.D. Anderson." Barbara Roosth Frank, a graduate of UTSSN, gave strong opening and closing testimony on the objective of the System's curriculum to prepare a nurse willing to make decisions, assume responsibility and accountability for her/his actions. Frank asked Committee members what type of nurse they would like to have caring for them in the emergency room: one that would say "Doctor, what should I do?" or "Doctor, come assist and di- ST^Ron Waters Your Representative in Austin. "It's just Kucha prfvilegu to hint- him as our Representative! There just .iren't many like him — with his integrity and honestv." — Gertrude Barnstone "What impressed me most about Hon was that he < ami' to our county uonvrntion and said he is for the KKA ha .mse it is ri«ht — regardless ot political pressure Hon has the integrity to vote his conscience " — Donna Duerk "Ron Waters is obviously out of step v\ ith many of the other Texas state representatives. Hopefully they'll see the light and eventually catch up!" — Pokey Anderson "When I was assistant coordinator of Texans for ERA, Ron's office became my second headquarters. While it's relatively easy for an urban Representative to be pro-ERA. few are dedicated enough to offer such day-to-day tangibleservic.es. Ron was second only to Sarah Weddington in active support for KKA." — Debra Danburg We support Ron Waters because he has supported us. Pokey Anderson Gloria Guardiola Poppy Northcutt Peggy Hall Susan Heavey Brenda Lewis Ann K. Lower Sharon Mac'ha Keith McGee Lynn Mutchler Betty Barnes Gertrude Barnstone Marjon Bryan Donna Duerk Debra Danhurg Jim Davidson Cilia Kstrada Carolyn Nichols Jan Pierce Mary Ross Rhyne Juneau Shepherd Alice Shrader Olga Soli/ Kav and Cliff VYhvburn II ymi ( (iii help ill the < unifMtigii In mvttt t Hoi Wotcrs. nil 527-!ll.1f) or stop by neodqtmrters. 250H Riilph, Suite W'.iA. Vote Tuesday, Nov. 2 ■ lo. cy ««*• VMWu Campaign ComMM 2*» Hatfth =**•* 103A H i Ton-'~TXmj*nt*»n%.<~m VmgpCharmar red." She asserted the UTSSN produced a graduate that acted on behalf of the patient. A 1974 graduate from the Houston campus reaffirmed the excellent clinical competency of the UT graduate nurse. Happy Barnett said that although no one could take away her education, she expressed regret for students in the future who may not receive the same kind of patient-centered education. Many witnesses spoke directly to the tension between two major groups within the health care delivery system: the doctors and the nurses. Dr. Armando Cuellar, a physician from Weslaco, Texas, stated that M.D.s have not kept up with the changes in nursing education and practice since their own medical school days. He acknowledged that his own perceptions of nurses had been limited until his two daughters graduated from the UTSSN and until he attended a UTSSN continuing education program. Addressing himself to the controversial question of doctors vs. nurses and the attendant issues of professional autonomy, Chancellor Walker emphasized that the Regents' decision did not put nursing education back under the control of doctors. He stated that "all six deans will determine their own academic program." In makin'g that statement, he ignored the July 9 motion by Regent Joe Nelson, M.D. to the Regents, stating that "the Board of Regents authorize and direct that nursing education in the University of Texas System shall* place major emphasis on training nurses for direct patient care. Faculty and staff should encourage students to plan careers in direct patient care . . ." Walker further avoided mention of the ill-founded contentions contained in the "Report" and instead couched his defense of the Regents' decision in terms of the "anachronistic" nature of UTSSN, stating that it had become a "burden" to UT, and maintaining that this "reorganization" was done to be consistent with the rest of the UT structure. At this point, a faculty member turned to a state legislator in the hearing room and said, "In that case, M.D. Anderson is also an anachronism and should be placed under the Health Science Center." At the conclusion of Walker's testimony, Chairman Head found it fitting to express his appreciation for everyone's presence and testimony, but singled out Walker for special thanks because "we all know how busy you are." The remark did not go unnoticed by witnesses and observers who had interrupted their schedules and traveled from the far corners of the state to participate in the hearings. In his summation, Charles Babb, attorney for the Texas Nurses Association, pointed out to Head and Committee members that "some of these nurses risked their careers by testifying today. In fact, when they return to work tomorrow morning, they might not have a job." The question of whether trje Regents had the authority to abolish the UTSSN created by the Texas legislature in 1967 is currently under litigation, with attorney Babb representing the TNA in their suit against the UT Regents. That legislative interest in this controversial issue is growing was evidenced by the presence of several state legislators during the hearings. State Representatives Lance Lalor (D- Houston), Gonzalo Barrientos (D-Austin), Ben Reyes ID- Houston) and Wilhelmina Delco (D-Austin) were present, as well as the aides of Senator Gene Jones (D-Houston) and Representative Gene Green CD- Houston). Senator Jones wrote Head, "This decision will not only adversely affect the nursing profession and the development of sound nursing education in the state of Texas. The interests of the entire state health care delivery system, patients included, will be seriously thwarted." After the hearing, nurses stated that they intend to win the battle for nursing autonomy in Texas. In fact, Texas nurses are meeting with measurable suc- ces in their efforts to publicize their plight, to organize themselves for action, and to educate and activate themselves politically. The development of their visibility and credibility as an important political interest group to be reckoned with in the state legislative arena has been made apparent to political observers in the state—not only by the impressive show of support and the strength of their arguments on September 9 but, perhaps more significantly, by the fact that the hearings were held in the first place. DEMOCRAT GENE JONES STATE SENATE, DISTRICT 7 "Gene Jones, 41, of Houston continued to rate near the top in his second term. Jones was by jar the best member of the Harris County delegation and one of the handful of members with thorough knowledge of the House rules." Texas Monthly Magazine July, 1975 POLITICAL ADVERTISING PAID BY GCNC JOMCS CAMPAIGN GLORiA JONIS CHAIRWOMAN