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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Page 14
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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 14. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3583.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3583

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 14, October 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3583.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_521n.jpg
Transcript HISD girls' athletics left at the post Elizabeth Bennett of the Houston Post is to be commended for her recent series of articles* on Title IX and the Houston Independent School District. Despite the assurances or Joe Tusa, HISD's Assistant Superintendent for Athletics, Health and Physical Education, and others interviewed in the series, progress is not being made at HISD in developing an acceptable program for interscholastic athletics for girls Rather, female students and their parents are being provided with "secondary" and relatively inexpensive programs which hold little interest for the students. Aside from an interview with Irma Cuellar, a physical education teacher at Jackson Junior High School who, last spring, filed a sex discrimination complaint against HISD, most of Bennett's material concentrated on the views of Joe Tusa and Sarah Steelman, Assistant Principal at Westbury High School. Both referred frequently to "an extensive study" that was made in HISD in 1973. Tusa and Steelman gave the impression that things were progressing nicely in HISD insofar as compliance with Title IX in the high schools was concerned. (They do admit non-compliance in the junior high schools.) However, the "extensive study"-a Report on Expansion of Girls' Athletic Program, compiled by the Task Force for Expansion ef the Girls' Athletic Program (of which Steelman was a "co-chairman")—is, in most instances, directly contrary to the quoted statements bv Tusa and Steelman. Contradiction: Speaking of women's sports, Tusa stated that before the 1974-75 school year there was "very little emphasis on women's sports because of women themselves " Fact: According to the 1973 Task Force Report: 95% of the 1,319 parents responded affirmatively to the following question: With proper guidance and leadership, would you approve of your daughter's participation in. . .basketball, Softball, etc. . . .on a competitive basis at the senior high school level? As for the students' lack of interest. Of 2,342 girls participating in the study . . .92.8% [reported that they] benefitted from participation in sports. And the teachers: The results taken of the entire physical education staff indicate that 93% are willing to attend inservice workshops for coaching purposes. Contradiction: Speaking of basketball, Tusa said, "It's not feasible to offer the sport for girls now. There's only one gym at many of our schools which makes it difficult for all to play . . . We (the boys' basketball teams) would not be competitive any longer if gym time had to be divided and ! think By Jan Cunningham jur teams are the best in the state." Fact: According to the Task Force Report, 12 of 23 HISD senior and junior/senior high schools have separate gyms but that has very little to do with why basketball isn't offered to the girls. The real reason appears on page 9 of the report: The dates of the University Interscholastic League Girls' Basketball Plan overlap with the date for the University Interscholastic League Boys' Basketball Plan and this presents a conflict regarding the use of gymnasiums and field houses. Virtually the same reason was given for the failure of HISD to provide girls with an interscholastic volleyball program. Contradiction: Sarah Steelman addressed herself to the interests of the students in the Post series: "One thing the study told them," says Steelman, "was that more girls on the senior high level wanted track and field and golf. The needs more or less reflected the ethnic areas; track and field reflected the inner-city areas and golf, the suburban areas." Fact: Not so according to the Task Force Report: Girls participating in the HISD Survey on Interschool Athletics were asked to rank activities not offered in the existing program that they would like to see included. The results were as follows: 1. Badminton 2. Softball 3. Basketball 4. Bowling 5. Tumbling/Gymnastics 6. Track & Field 7 Golf These findings were based on an activity receiving the largest number of first, second and third place votes. It was clearly evident that bad minton was the first choice and softball the second. Bowling received more first place rankings than basketball, but basketball was the second and third choice of more girls than bowling. Golf received more last place votes than any activity. Basketball, insists Steelman, was not among the leading activities of interest of those surveyed. It is obvious that there is a great discrepancy between the desires of parents and students and the desires of HISD. The girl students are currently being offered programs that will take away as little as possible (i.e., money or facilities) from the well-established on-going boys' programs. And they are being offered programs in which they have expressed little or no interest! Tusa thinks the boys' programs are the best in the state and to Superintendent Billy Reagan, "The problem is money. If we don't come up with any other solution, we'll be faced with reducing the boys' programs." "And what about the girls' P.E. programs?" Bennett asked Tusa "We give them anything they want," he says. "All they have to do is ask for it." O f "Today'' Sept. 5-7, 1976 Big 2 News With Sara Lowrey, Larry Rasco, Doug Johnson and Bill Worrell Best Sellers presents a continuing series "Captains and the Kings"