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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Page 13
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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 13. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3582.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3582

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 13, October 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3582.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_521m.jpg
Transcript Arts and Reviews ain't no man can put a chain on ZOE BONNIE BRAMLETT A choice record Lady's Choice—Bonnie Bramlett (Capricorn Records CP0169). Like many other American women, Bonnie Bramlett is, she says, rediscovering herself- after several ups and downs during her musical career. With her ex-husband she was part of Delaney and Bonnie, and was in some circles the queen of "blue-eyed soul" after Janis Joplin. Investigating her artistic identity apparently meant a search into general roots, and her latest album includes eleven of the best rhythm 'n blues pieces of the last twenty years. Bramlett has been singing professionally since she was 13. She started working in her native St. Louis with Albert King, Chuck Berry and Little Milton. "I grew up listening to the great women R&B artists, like LaVern Baker, Ruth Brown, Etta James," she says. "And of course Tina Turner was probably the biggest influence on me. She was the only singer to spend a lot of time working with me, and teaching me how to sing soul music." At 18, Bonnie went on the road, working with various bands including Cannonball Adderley's. Friends and musicians on early Bramlett discs (and Delaney and Bonnie cuts) included Leon Russell, Rita Coolidge, Eric Clapton, and Gregg Allman. She worked with George Harrison and recorded with the then unknown Average White Band. The album is a healthy, erotic statement of women's freedom. Bonnie especially brings new meaning to the Porter-Hayes hit, Hold On, I'm Coming, and Hank Ballard's Let's Co. While a lot of these songs were written by men, most of rock music and progressive country songs are written by men because of discrimination against women artists (especially composers and musicians). But Bonnie does get Valerie Simpson's wonderful, bluesy Let's Co Cet Stoned on here, with its amused resignation (Now you know my baby he won't let me in/1 got myself a few pennies/I'm goin' to buy myself a bottle of gin/Then I'm goin' call my friends on the telephone/And say, 'Let's go get stoned.') And there's a fine soulful interpretation of Gloria Jones'/ Pamela Sawyer's If I Were Your Woman, in which Bramlett brings her full repertoire of down-home sounds to lay out the message {If I were your woman . . . You'd be weak as a lamb). If you're into this kind of music, Bonnie's exploration of musical self is a nice place to visit. By Kit van Cleave "I can't separate womanhood from my music," says feisty feminist songwriter Natalie Zoe, "because it's always been so intertwined. I wrote my first song at 17, and it was a feminist song, Ain't No Man Can Put A Chain On Me." The lyrics read: / wander about and do what I please, Making love and friends with ease, And if I have a child, A bastard shall be, Because ain't no man can put a chain on me. "I got involved in feminist activities at 17, when I was still in high school," she points out. "Later, at University of Wisconsin, I got into a lot of radical activity and found I had an emerging feminist consciousness. Now I'm less political and more musical, but I'll never move away from that powerful, creative source." Zoe is just back from New England, where she worked with feminist filmmakers Julia Gibson and Joan Walden. Together, the two produced the first film from Me, Too, Productions, a series of vignettes called Rose, showing the daily life of a woman from feminist perspectives. Zoe wrote the soundtrack music and two songs for the film. Natalie has made Houston home, moving here from Austin (where she was a hit with two bands of her own, Natty Bumpo and All You Can Eat) to be closer to recording studios. She had a big following in Austin; fans would sing along with her songs A Little Bit Shy or 46 Candles. She had a few pieces recorded in a John Stuckey album; Bonnie Raitt and Doug Sahm encouraged her to record. At 22, Zoe looks like Bette Midler. Like Midler, she's also enormously talented, an earthy yenta and foxy lady whose first notes make people stop talking and start listening. And she works seriously at both guitar (and theory. Zoe says experience has taught her that success for women in music today still depends largely on making friends with men in powerful positions. *Antiques *Quilts *China GREAT EXPECTATIONS 618 Town&Country Village "I think women are expected to fall into line, play the games, do roles. I'm always being told, 'Don't come on so strong, don't wear pants onstage, don't be forward, loud, aggressive.' Music managers see self- assertive women as aggressive because the women have their own ideas about how to make their own music," she says. Some Houston club owners will not hire female musicians at all, thus creating another barrier to women's music. "Being a woman and playing my own music, most of which is feminist, does set me apart, makes me different from what is happening musically in town," she points out. "Sometimes there are hassles with male musicians, and female musicians here often do not have sisterhood." "I first started writing songs that I wanted to hear," Natalie says today. "I got tired of role- playing love songs like Behind Closed Doors. I never moon over a man. My songs, I think, are statements about communication, strength of being a woman, confusion, sorrow, joy. But I don't write or sing sappy love songs. I leave that to women who have men directing their careers, like Olivia Newton-John and Karen Carpenter." Recently having been contacted about the possibility of cutting a record, Natalie says that if the negotiations finalize, she'll put her own songs on as the major cuts. One certain inclusion is There's More To Life Than Loving A Man (1973). / think about you constantly, Your lovin's on my mind, I'll be with you whenever I can, But you know this music takes up all my time. And another song sure to be recorded is Zoe's Stuck in Topeka (1974). And I can't hop a freight- It's too dangerous if I get found, I'll be manhandled, There'll be no escape. But don't they know, I won't let them push me around? "It's getting easier to make a dent in the music/recording system," Zoe says, "but it's still difficult to get in, get cooperation and support, and do feminist songs while fightirTg to stay an individual. I expect more and more women to follow Blossom Dearie's example and form their own recording companies. Then we can control the music, production and employment. Won't that be terrific?" NATALIE ZOE