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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 6. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3575.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3575

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 6, October 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3575.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_521f.jpg
Transcript YWCA shelters women in crisis By Ann Harris "Women, and often their children, who are homeless in Houston because of crisis in their lives have far too few places and people to turn to for help right now. No one doubts the need for such housing and supportive services, although comprehensive, exact statistics are difficult to determine," stated Peggy Kirkendall, chairwoman of the recently formed Committee on Crisis Housing for Women and board member of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) here. "We get about 100 calls a month at the Y alone," reports Elizabeth Otey Terry, associate executive director for the local chapters, "and we're only one of several groups receiving these pleas for help. Currently there are only about eight small facilities, often specializing in a particular type of need, such as drugs, alcohol or ex-offenders. Beds are few in these places and the length of time a woman is allowed to stay is often too short for her needs or too long (ranging from six months to six years) to free space rapidly enough for others needing it." The referrals and counseling services the present facilities offer are usually at a parapro- fessional level and not available around the clock, according to Terry and Kirkendall. They propose a center to offer temporary refuge, as well as in- depth support programs, tailored to each woman's needs. Follow-up for every person is planned, also. The center would be open to any woman, even if she brings children. Any suggestion that the crisis center might duplicate the existing facilities exasperates Terry. "Women's needs are so great in their troubles that there can't be duplication of services. We don't even have 200 beds in Houston, and if a family is involved there are only a handful." The Committee on Crisis Housing for Women grew out of the YWCA program development committee chaired by Hanni Orton YWCA officials called on other concerned persons. Among the diversified group are representatives from 15 other women's organizations, such as Women in Action, the Houston Rape Crisis Coalition and the Southwest Chapter of the National Organization for Women; also, the Harris County Sheriff's Department, Child Welfare, TRIMS and Texas Research Institute, as well as individuals from religion, real estate, and law. Nikki Van Hightower, women's advocate for the mayor's office, is also active in the issue. Task forces of the committee are wrestling with the problems of locating a building or land, funding, programs and policy, arousing community awareness and documenting specific cases of women in Houston who have needed such low-cost, temporary housing and help. "We're at a very exciting time-the brain-picking stage. We're learning a lot, fast. The response so far has been excellent," Kirkendall commented. The task forces are drawing on expert help. "For example, we're in touch with centers across the country, trying not only to find out what they're doing, but also to anticipate possible problems and thereby avoid them ourselves." They are also investigating ways to avoid the same woman having to return repeatedly. "The real trick will be to get all the datelines synchronized for the various complex components' of the project so the funds, building, personnel, services will all mesh at the required time," noted Terry. Eligibility guidelines, the number of persons, who can be served and stringent licensing requirements are yet to be considered. Because a woman's crisis often comes from or is com- Now our news team has expanded as Jan Carson joins Dave Ward to co-anchor the 6:00 p.m. news along with Ed Brandon, Bob Allen and Marvin Zindler. Jan, whose vast professional experience covers everything from tornadoes to the ammonia tank truck explosion, is another reason why we're Houston's choice for news. EYEWITNESS NEWS Now we're one better. Jan Carson co-anchors the news with Dave Ward. Weeknights at 6:00 p.m. ELIZABETH OTEY TERRY pounded by her economic dependence, Kirkendall envisions an expansion of the present YWCA programs of career development, job training, personal growth, and financial planning (insurance, taxes, credit, real estate, wills and legal rights.) "We're looking not just at the situation in 1976, however. We're trying to project what will be demanded in 1996 so that the housing we provide for crisis will be flexible enough to adapt to women's changing needs in the future," Terry said. The concern for crisis housing for women is a natural outgrowth of the Houston YWCA's philosophy and program, begun in 1907 "We are the oldest women's movement in the world," Terry claimed. "And we're completely separate and different from the YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association). The YWCA does allow men to take classes as associate members, but they are not thereby given voting rights in determining how the group is run." "Perhaps in some women's views the YWCA has become stereotyped in recent years as tame and apart from controversy, but it has many giant steps to its credit which were considered very radical at the time," Kirkendall and Terry said. One of the first "controversial" steps the Y took was to provide living quarters for single women displaced by the social conditions caused by the Crimean War. The YWCA later became an accepted lifestyle for "respectable" women. The need then was for shelter and protection in a structured setting, with a parlor to entertain "gentlemen friends"-and a curfew, Terry said. Today's woman needs shelter and protection, too, but in new ways and for new reasons. Although a YWCA is automatically looked to as a source of low-cost rooms, Houston has no such facility. Two years ago, financial pressures forced the organization to give up the Ben Milam Hotel as its quarters. As another example of the Y's innovative and radical reputation, Terry shares a favorite story: Because women were excluded from universities, and even some high schools, the YWCA offered typing classes to help women become financially independent. Not only was this considered immoral, because her ankle might be exposed as she operated the typewriter foot pedal, but the classes were judged to be too strenuous for women to endure. The local chapters give classes in crafts, physical activities and leisure-recreation, interests. Also included are cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, transactional analysis, signing for the deaf, and skills courses such as typing and shorthand. "Women's Liberation and Literature," a seminar on the conflicting role of mother-wife woman, and a presentation by the feminist theater group, "Stand Up Sisters," on October 27, are also scheduled for the fall. Suggestions or information concerning crisis housing, especially in documenting actual cases, should be directed to Elizabeth Otey Terry (523-6881) at the Downtown YWCA, 3515 Allen Parkway. Membership fees in the YWCA are low and privileges are reciprocal at facilities around the world. The organization states it is a "movement that recognizes each woman as a person with her own inalienable rights," which the YWCA has been fighting for during the past 118 years. In 1976 the first priority is "to thrust our collective power toward the elimination of racism wherever it exists and by any means necessary." Terry pointed out that as racism is conquered, women become freer to unite against sexism.