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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Page 5
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Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 5. October 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 26, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3574.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1976). Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3574

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1976-10 - Page 5, October 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 26, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3590/show/3574.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1976-10
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_521e.jpg
Transcript The Equal Rights Amendment and International Women's Year, I learned from this address, are intimately involved with the anti-life syndrome. "You won't attend a women's liberation meeting without finding they're always talking about getting abortions." I learned too that Jimmy Carter had revealed abortionist sympathies and that once you can kill the unborn, you can kill anybody. I was told to withhold my taxes as long as there is federal funding for abortions. Marx claimed that in the last year in America, there had been more abortions than the sum total of the deaths from all the wars in our country's history. I kept wanting to ask him if concern for human life should extend to the victims of wars, of capital punishment? Should we have withheld taxes during the Vietnam war? But Dr. Marx( never acknowledged my up-. raised_ha_n<± The contradictions floating around this convention crystallized for me while I watched a film titled The Committee after lunch. This short feature showed nine white-coated committee of experts who were engaged in deciding "who should be allowed to live" by gesturing thumbs up or down at a series of photographs flashed in front of them. An unctuous narrator asked by what yardstick we could decide who was to live and who was to die. Social status? Ethnic group? Respectability? Usefulness? Age? We see the committee giving thumbs down to pictures of black kids, poor kids, old people, foreigners. The implication? was that abortion is a means of weeding out deviants and undesirables, or imposing some narrow standard on the population. This from people who can't tolerate gays or feminists. For all the naivete and sophistry contained in their ideology, I must concede an impressive sophistication to the conventioneers in the area of political techniques. I attended two workshops (on the manipulation of party politics and how to lobby for a constitutional amendment) which would have been valuable to any special interest group. They are aware of the political and financial pressures which may be brought to bear on legislators, of the apathy and ignorance which keeps people from the polls, making it possible for a handful of determined people to have their way. The fine points of hounding Congress, the value of finding "key people" - civic leaders, legislators and wealthy campaign contributers - to plead one's cause, the process of electing convention delegates and composing resolutions: all these were intelligently expounded and it became very clear that an organized, vocal minority could acquire a lot of clout. I encountered overt sexism only of the tritest sort. The political experts spoke uniform- • ly of congressmen and the need to get "the wife and kids to help" in campaigning and described precinct conventions as "separating the men from the boys. . ." No one talked about women's issues, not even Mildred Jefferson, the lucid, appealing black doctor from Harvard who heads the National Right to Life Committee, the only woman speaker I heard. She talked exclusively of doctors and patients and ethical commitments instead. Dr. Mathew Talty, an elderly male gynecologist who co- hosted a workshop with Dr. Jefferson, made such remarks as "The trauma of unwanted pregnancy is nothing to that of abortion. . a woman who has had an abortion will always wonder if she's worthy to have a baby." This sort of undocumented assurance was typical of the information offered for the audience to swallow whole; meanwhile we were constantly warned of the false allegations and misinterpreted statistics employed by the pro-abortion legions. Propaganda, it appeared, was the exclusiveweap- on of the enemy - it was even discussed in one workshop how best to refute the Gallup and Harris polls which had stated that a majority of Americans favored abortion. Claims of the pro-lifers, however, were articles of faith which required less scrutiny. It was the illogic, the isolation, the smugness, which offended me. Crowding, starvation, child abuse -- none of these were refuted as problems related to the abortion issue; they were simply not acknowledged. I was actually told that women don't become pregnant from rape or incest and are only fertile for twenty-four hours each month. Above all, the men and women who attended this convention in equal numbers seemed devoid of compassion. I watched the Catholic kids at my table nodding and clapping as Dr. Marx held forth on the evils of premarital sex ("carelessness with God's gifts" - the first step in a pattern of disregard for human life) and wondered if these eighteen- year-old males were so well insulated as not to desire to "express love in this unnecessary physical manner" or if they believed that "if you have intercourse with a girl, you can never trust her again," as Marx said. I wondered how the two high school girls were convinced that an unwanted pregnancy was something that stood outside their lives' possibilities. Might they not find themselves at twenty-four in my shoes, frightened enough to question their convictions? The Pro-Life issue seemed to be the rallying cry for a bunch of people who wanted to talk conservative politics and moralize. What should have been a humane and moving cause came across without humanity. If I had had any inkling of sympathy or broad-mindedness in the group, I might have been moved by the zeal around me. Instead, I felt that these people had as little concern for my ordeal, as little awareness of the world in which millions of women like me face unwanted pregnancy, as Marie Antoinette is reported to have had for the peasants who were without bread. message from ppch= Band-aid surgery By Glenda Ridens Laparoscopic tubal ligation or band-aid surgery is a surgical procedure in which the fallopian tubes are either cauterized, or sealed with silastic bands. At present the procedure must be done in a hospital under local or general anesthesia; it can be done on an out-patient basis and takes less than an hour to perform. This permanent female sterilization procedure has been growing in popularity since the late 1960's. Planned Parenthood Center of Houston has been referring patients for band-aid surgery since the Spring of 1974. To date, PPCH has counseled and referred 759 women. The total cost of laparoscopy can be as much as $700 for hospital and physician's fees. All hospitals accept insurance, but because laparoscopy is an elective procedure done on an out-patient basis, many insurance policies do not cover it. For this reason, PPCH has a cash-pay program set up with the hospitals. Under the cash- pay program, patients without insurance can obtain the surgery for $325-$350, depending on the hospital. PPCH also participates in the federally funded program known as Title XX. This program is designed to help women who have low incomes and cannot afford the laparoscopy. Women who cannot be served by the above means are aided by the PPCH Auxiliary or by a Houston foundation which contributes funds specifically earmarked for this purpose. During a typical month the laparoscopy counselor interviews and refers about 40 women, sends out about 120 bro chures and receives about 300 phone calls for information. Most women hear about the program from friends and/or relatives who are served by PPCH. Generally a woman who is interested in a form of female sterilization begins by calling PPCH and requesting information. She is sent a brochure that explains the procedure, answers most of the questions a woman asks about laparoscopy, outlines the cost of the procedure and lists the doctors to whom patients are referred. After reading the brochure, the woman calls for an interview appointment. The interview usually requires an hour to complete. By the time she has set up an appointment, the woman, in most cases, has made a definite decision to follow through with the procedure. However, one of the most important points that is stressed throughout the interview is that the laparoscopy is permanent; thus, after the interview occasionally a woman decides she isn't ready for the procedure. In this case, she will usually decide to continue the method of birth control she is using at that time. If not, alternative forms of birth control are discussed and she and the counselor will try to find the method best suited to her needs. PPCH believes that a person has the right to know all she or he can know before making choices and decisions. Laparoscopy is an alternative choice for a woman if she wants to discontinue her reproductive life. It is for this reason that we offer the laparoscopy counseling and referral service. THINK What it would mean to have a Woman's voice on Commissioner's Court VOTE Janis pool for County Commissioner Precinct #3 Kakttor by Jar* O. Pool Campaign Fund R.G.Pop».Trw»Ji«r COCKTAILS ICHeL RESTAURANT CUISINE FRANCAISE FREE PREGNANCY TESTING & INFORMATION 868 - 4483 • LUNCH AND DINNER • SUNDAYS — ST. MICHEL MUNCH • BANQUET FACILITIES "»*»■■• "U"CM OPEN 11.-00 AM-MM PM 522-0041 2150 RICHMOND AVE (At corner of 6r*«nbrl«r) illustrator/designer house of coleman 713/523-2521 k m -r$*/eu^ eftu* e*« u)*a ow**»iy Vtov*cs Hon+Ta**, lonm^A 6 p«\ Wed. -**iru Sd* todm V\ «*&**$* I