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Pointblank Times 1976-02
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Pointblank Times 1976-02 - Page 1. February 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3297/show/3285.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1976). Pointblank Times 1976-02 - Page 1. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3297/show/3285

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times 1976-02 - Page 1, February 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3297/show/3285.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times 1976-02
Date February 1976
Description Vol. 2 No. 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • Periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_415a.jpg
Transcript pointtJanl< times a lesbian/feminist publication houston, texas vol . II no. 2 february 1976 504 You Are What You Wear Several of us in the collective had heard second and third hand that the Old Plantation (formerly the Bayou Landing), a gay bar/discotheque, was enforcing a dress code which discriminated against blacks and women. We thought it would be interesting to check it out, so four of us "dressed up" and went to the bar. The man at the door let in two of us (one wearing a pant suit and one in a dress) but stopped the other two (dressed in blue jeans--one tacky, one respectable), because they did not meet the dress code standard. We asked for an explanation and he called the manager, Jodi. OLD PLANTATION DRESS CODE dykes" ("you know what I mean") coming in and starting fights. The overall manager of the chain (he said) still has scars on his back from a scrap with a "bull dyke" who had scratched him. Hence, said Jodi, it was understandable that the management disliked this "kind of woman." Jodi was extremely patient, polite and patronizing, and amazingly cooperative. This, to the best of our recollections and with the aid of notes one of us took during the conversation, is what he said. The Old Plantation is one club in a chain of 27 in the United States, all of which are obliged by the corporate entity which owns them to enforce this dress code. Jodi said surprise visitors checked on the club and his job would be on the line if someone not conforming to the code was found on the premises. (Interestingly, Jodi is supposed to wear a coat and tie while on duty and was riskinq rebuke for inappropriate dress himself.) What purpose is the code meant to serve, we asked. Jodi said the Bayou Landing had been troubled with "big bull LADIES MUST BE IN FEMININE ATTIRE PANT SUITS OR DRESSES ONLY. NO JEANS OF ANY KIND. MEN -- NO FEMININE ATTIRE OR HATS. But, we said, how does this relate to the dress code. After all, troublemakers can wear pantsuits, and jeans do not per se mean the wearer is a bad person. Jodi agreed. He himself, after all, often wore jeans off duty. Could men come in jeans, we asked? It depended on who was at the desk, said Jodi. Those who are undesirable in the judgment of whoever is working at the desk are turned away. How do you detect undesirables? Not easy, he said. Well, we asked, what about the prohibition against hats. Didn't this discriminate against blacks? Referring back to the old club, Jodi said blacks in drag and wearing hats came to the Bayou Landing, some of whom "weren't even gay" and caused trouble, hustled, even rolled other customers. So yes, the code was designed to keep out all but a very few blacks, "the nice ones." Again, he confessed, it was a problem figuring out which blacks were "nice." Since Jodi agreed with us that people cannot be evaluated by the clothes they wear, we asked why they didn't just let everyone in and do the patrolling inside. He said he and another employee are, in continued on back page