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Breakthrough 1976-08
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Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 18. August 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3205.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976). Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 18. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3205

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 18, August 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3205.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date August 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 18
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_519r.jpg
Transcript ... ...-.,,,, o a c 0) > CO Q CO Margo St. James, founder of COYOTE, second from left and participants at the First World Meeting of Prostitutes. Meeting becomes "media event" 18 By Katherine Davenport The First World Meeting of Prostitutes, held in Washington recently, was a media event which quickly drew more reporters than participants. The timing and location were perfect. The meeting hit the capital June 23—27, during a fairly slow news period. And after Wayne Hays- Elizabeth Ray had become the second recent "Congressional sex scandal," the press corps was hungry for stories about illicit sex. The meeting was originally set for the Sheraton-Park but was moved to the Wellington Apartment Hotel in Georgetown at the last minute. Margo St. James, founder of COYOTE (Call Off Your Old Tired Ethics), said the Sheraton-Park cancelled because a group of judges had met there a week earlier. The more pleasant but smaller Wellington was overwhelmed. "I can't take care of the regular guests for all this junk," a front desk employee was overheard saying. Several excellent shorts and documentaries about women were shown. Most dealt with prostitution and women in prison. COYOTE'S stated intention was to bring "to the general public a clearer picture of prostitution in America-providing information, real life situations, human sensitivity stories-that will lead all who see these films to the conclusion that prostitution in America should be de- criminalized-that the present laws on prostitution are unjust, discriminatory and oppressive." Among the more outstanding documentaries were Woman To Woman, an award winner about hookers, housewives and "other mothers," directed bv Bonna Deitch (rental: Donne Deitch, 17 Ironside, Venice, CA 90291); Mustang: The House That Joe Built, a portrait of the inner workings of a legal brothel in Nevada, directed by Robert Guralnick; and Self-Health, a film made by the San Fransisco Health Center "which provides clear and enlightened instruction on methods of examination of one's body." On Thursday evening a "Congressional Reception" was held at the Wellington. Senators and Representatives were invited to attend this combination cocktail party and press conference; few of them appeared, but the place was packed with the press and on-lookers. The big day was Saturday which started with a "Luncheon with the Lewd and Loyal" given by Margo St. James. Guest speakers included Florynce Kennedy, Ti-Grace Atkinson, Fr. DePaul Genska and economist George W. Hilton. Margo and Flo played the "lewd," Ti-Grace, Fr. Genska and George the "loyal." Atkinson, an early supporter of prostitutes in the movement, spoke first. "Identifying people by what they do is dangerous. The broader our movement, the more women we have in it with different experiences. Prostitution is the one institution that is connected, without question, to class and economics." New York's welfare office recently revealed Atkinson's files to the press (reportedly for money) and the word rapidly spread around the world that she was on welfare. "Welfare makes you think about prostitution, the state, etc.," she said. "There is no way to deal with prostitution without taking on the state. Prostitution rips away the veil of benevolence." After this talk, St. James announced that COYOTE is starting a legal defense fund, the Virginia Woodhull Legal Defense Fund, named after Virginia Woodhull, who ran for President in 1868. She then introduced George W. Hilton, Professor of Economics at UCLA, who delivered an address from his paper, 'The Prohibition of Prostitution: An Economic Analysis." The final speaker was Fr. DePaul Genska, a Franciscan priest who works New York streets from 1-7 a.m., talking with prostitutes and paying them for their time. He works with Scapegoat, an organization started by former prostitute and madam, Marie Maggu. One Scapegoat project is providing child care for prostitutes. "I have been obliged to remain a whore since my arrest and official labeling in 1962." The next event was billed as the Afternoon Caucus, a "discussion of a model law, de-crimina- lization, a Woman's Slate and resolutions to be taken to the Democratic and Republican conventions." The Oxford Universal Dictionary defines a caucus as a "private or preliminary meeting of members of a political party, to select candidates for office, or to concert measures for furthering party interests..." What actually happened was more like a confrontation/ encounter group, perhaps the first of its kind. The group included prostitutes and vice squad representatives, feminists, porno stars, assorted radicals and, of course, the ever-present media. The first person to address the group was Dr. Janus of the New York Medical Center. He and Dr. Bess, also present, recently released the results of their study detailing personal investments lawmakers have in prostitution. According to their findings, 60% of politicians "habitually" patronize prostitutes. Dr. Janus defined a habitual "John" as one who uses the services of a prostitute once, twice or three times a week. Unfortunately the two doctors rushed away, so there wasn't much time for discussion. St. James revealed that she had been a domestic servant for seven years, and that she had been radicalized by Florynce Kennedy. "I have been obliged to remain a whore since my arrest and official labeling in 1962 (although I won an appeal the next year)," St. James wrote in an editorial in Coyote Howls. "As late as 1973, I had been refused other kinds of employment. I was fired from a volunteer fire lookout job in the National Park Service two days before I was to report for duty due to the publicity in California about my whorganizing...even though Sen. Jackson and the bureaucrats knew of my shady past beforehand. It's these kinds of experiences that radicalize people." Awards were presented for Trick of the Year. Two local vice squad officers introduced themselves, and two streetwalkers they'd brought along came to the front to answer questions. Hostility was building between the men and the women in the room, between the feminists and the officers. Some of the press were angry because they were asked not to photograph or tape people who were speaking* "Nobody needs pimps," an officer commented. "Nobody needs pigs," some women shouted. The officer looked genuinely hurt. To conclude, St. James read Dr. Jennifer James' U.S. resolution passed at the Brussels Crimes Against Women Conference last March. Three hours later the "Bicentennial Ball" got underway at Bixby's Warehouse on Connecticut Ave. Once again, the media dominated the scene. A show was put on for them which included a presentation of awards for Trick of the Year. The nominees were JFK ("posthumorless- ly"), Howard Hughes, Jack Nicholson, Frank Sinatra and Rep. Wilbur Mills. The Winner- Jack Nicholson, "and all the boys in blue and men of the cloth engaged in equal enforcement dragnets." For Pig of the Year, the nominees were Ed Davis, (Chief of Police, L.A.), Hustler magazine, the U.S. Supreme Court (for the Virginia decision that practically allows cops to peer into your home and arrest you if you are not in the missionary position), and Rep. Wayne Hays. And the Winner-Ed Davis. For Pimp of the Year, the nominees were Joe Conforte (Nevada brothel owner), Hugh Hefner, Rev. Moon, and Werner Erhard. This award was given to all of the nominees until St. James gave in to the audience and awarded it to Rev. Moon. For Hooker of the Year, the nominees were Jackie Onassis, Elizabeth Ray..."award for courage," Barbara Walters, Xaviera Hollander and Sally Stanford, an ex-madam elected Mayor of Sausalito. And the Winner was Barbara Walters. The award for Closet Queen of the Year went to Pope Paul VI, and the Clap Award of the Year went to Margaret Housen "for winning the suit against the man who gave her VD, which rendered her sterile-mixed blessings." A Sunrise Parade around the White House was scheduled for 5:30 a.m. Sunday. What happened there is anybody's guess.