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Breakthrough 1976-08
Page 15
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Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 15. August 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3202.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976). Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3202

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 15, August 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3202.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date August 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_519o.jpg
Transcript Arts and Reviews Hair Becomes Handles Peggy Moore, Houston Potter Work expresses inner growth By Beverly Hebert Peggy Moore is a Houston artist whose creations speak expressively to women. Her pottery, reflections of her own growth as an artist, communicates energy, liberation and ultimately-peace. "Women have gotten much more excited over my work than men. I think that says something. My women figures are liberating-they have strength and energy of force. I've seen women's faces-excited, they would turn to their husbands or grab them and say 'Look at that!' And the husbands would be sort of dead pan, and then the women would get quiet. "Men who do turn on are generally sensitive and compassionate. I think women see themselves in these figures with the same capacity for peace and energy." Has her art been influenced by the women's movement, by other people's awareness of women's problems and strivings? "My involvement has been very non-intellectual. I've been influenced, not only by women, but by friends in our lives who have struggled to free themselves. That kind of person is stimulating to me." As for her own struggle, the age-old dilemma of woman being wife and mother, and maintaining her identity, she relates: "I knew I didn't want to get married until I had found out what I really wanted to do." She also decided to have a child after reaching "a certain level of competence and security with my art...I knew I could pick it up again. Pottery is very time- consuming and immediate; the clay, once it has dried, can no longer be molded. You have to constantly work within its limits and demands. It's a real test of nerves and endurance to finish working on two or three important pots, when family responsibilities hover all around you. I'm fortunate because Barry, my husband, has always been very supportive." Looking thoughtful, she continued. "There is the recurring guilt that as a mother you're not spending enough time with your child. I have to deal with this issue more than any other. I block out one or two activities we share a day, added to general errands where we go together. Then the rest of the time* I let her clearly know she is on her own. There was a long, difficult period when this was painful to us both. Now, at age five, she accepts this time apart; sometimes she even comes into the studio and makes her own creations." "Did becoming a mother change you?" "Tremendously, more than anything else. I never felt so much a part of the human race before. It filled a gap and my work really changed after Clara was born. Some days it is the most freeing feeling in the world to leave my pots and to take her to the zoo. If a day comes when I've planned to work but Clara gets sick and can't go to school, rather than getting angry, I let go of everything, concentrate on just taking care of her, and end up loving the day. 'There is a freedom in concentration, as all one's energies can go into the work and not be consumed by preoccupations about what one ought to be doing. I give myself whole to what I'm doing at the moment. I strive for harmony, clarity, yet flexibility to be open to moments which offer themselves, to avoid rigid routine or obsessive action. I am really aware that each day of my life is different from any other day." "How did you find your medium of expression?" "I always had an interest in art and knew I had talent, but in college I majored in English. When I got out of school, I took a job at an art gallery and a night school course in pottery at the Museum of Fine Arts. I had already studied photography, a little sculpture, painting. My "A book, a dance or a piece of music or a relationship will move me so, I want to express this feeling in clay." father thought I'd never stay with anything. "I just went nuts over the pottery. I was devouring it. I loved it so much." For several years she made utilitarian mugs, goblets, planters and bowls, but finally moved from keeping stock inventory into developing a unique art form. Behind her, on a shelf, panthers follow peacocks in a circular chase, a snake coils around the handle of a teapot, and women dance in the most unique pot of all, their long legs flowing over into a pattern on the side of the bowl, their hair making winged handles. Occasionally she does variations on a theme, but she never duplicates a pot. Buyers do request exact replicas, but it is impossible to produce them because a potter cannot repeat the same shape on the wheel or the identical lines and glazes. "There are pots that cannot be improved upon. The butterfly, animal, or human figure flow out of the pot itself. On a single pot I might add an abstract design, or a drawing, or a bas relief sculpture, or I might elaborate with coils or slabs or carving. Those are ways to work with the pot in its wet stage. After it's bisque fired, I may spend hours hand painting them for the final glaze firing." Moore's work has its beginning when she clearly sees a mind image which she later executes. Describing how this happens she says: "Creativity flows like an automatic reflex. A book, a dance or a piece of music or a relationship will move me so, I want to express this feeling in clay. Having worked years on the techniques, now I am free, confident enough to make these images real. I don't have to think about throwing, centering, tooling. It's so exhilarating because I get this idea and I can get it out-no stumbling-go at it quickly. I get high! "Sometimes when I'm doing yoga, I'll see a design. There are days I go in the studio and I know it's going to be good, but not always. Generally, the best things come when I've been out in the studio working for two or three hours. What I do in the studio is surprising to me. I mean literally, the moment I do it I'm stunned!" As she talks about creative inspiration, it becomes apparent that ideas which seem at first to leap spontaneously into her mind, actually have a prior conception in a total way of being that stems from a deep openness to nature and to people. That openness extends outside her own work and family. There are times when she purposefully removes herself from home. "I leave my little nook and go on a trip by myself, or out to the country, or I visit someone who really means a lot to me- and it's this very thing society tells you not to do, but I come back a more creative wife and mother too. If you have this feeling of freedom and self- control and awareness, you can express it in anything you do." (M oore's work can be seen at the Du Bose Gallery, 2950 Kirby.) <C* HOUSTON *«S WALL PLANTER Terra cotta from Acatlan, Mexico $5.00 & $6.50 Part of our collection of traditional handmade crafts and arts from Latin cultures. 1710 Sunset Blvd. 527-9838 15