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Breakthrough 1976-08
Page 13
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Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 13. August 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976). Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3200

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 13, August 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date August 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 13
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_519m.jpg
Transcript OLYMPICS continued from page 1 Boglioli, Jill Strekel and Shirley Babashoff set a world record, and Lu Ann Ryan took a gold in Archery. The gold medal US. Equestrian team also had a woman, Mary Anne Tauskey. The U.S. Gymnastics team finished sixth overall and sent only one member to the all-around finals. In the field events, the only U.S. medal-winners were high- schooler Kathy McMillan with a silver in the Long Jump and "Kate the Great" Schmidt with a repeat bronze medal in the Javelin. The U.S. women's crew rowing in their first international competition, took a silver, as did the U.S. women's Basketball team, Joan Lind in the single sculls, and Margaret Murdock in the three position small bore rifle competition. To understand what happened to the United States women's Olympic team to make this year one one of their worst ever, consider three factors. First is the attitude toward women athletes that prevails in the U.S. That subject has been covered thoroughly by the feminist press recently. Until American girls and women are given the same physical education and athletic opportunities as boys and men, the United States will never again have a competitive women's team. In East European countries such as East Germany and the Soviet Union, female athletes already get the same training and coaching as men. Asked by Jim McKay why U.S. women swimmers were not going better, ABC commentator Donna DeVerona STONES continued from page 1 had passed by the billboard every time she drove down the Strip. It disturbed her and one day, on the way to a concert, she saw the words "This is a Crime Against Women" in bold red letters. "Although I was late for my date, I turned around and got the photo. Good thing, too," Malarek said, "because the sign was gone by 6:00 the next morning. Atlantic works fast." But the ad image continues to be used to promote the album and record stores in the Houston area are still carrying the album, although many admit "sales are going down." Also, locally, the Houston Organization Against Sexism in the Media, formed as a direct result of the Rolling Stones' "Black and Blue" album and its promotional campaign. They are supporting a national boycott of the album and all the Atlantic and Warner Communication, Inc. products, including Electra, Non Such and Warner Brothers Records and Wonder Woman Comics. The Houston OASM said in a release that they are currently involved in a massive phone-calling and letter-writing petition and in a general educational campaign on sexism in the media and on the "Black and Blue" album in particular. Beth Avocado-Blossom, one of the Houston OASM coordinators, said one of their most suc- cesful campaigns was the harassment of local Atlantic Records distributor, John Dunaway, who told her and Breakthrough that he was no longer with the company and to "please leave me a- lone. You're driving me crazy." suggested women may perform better in the future because of the new Title IX anti-discrimination rules. If a budding athlete survives the apathy and/or hostility of the educational system and prove herself to be of Olympic caliber, she must confront the second factor limiting Olympic success, the governing bodies of athletics in the United States, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the Amateur Athletic Union and the American Olympic Committee. Chauvinism again prevails, and the prospective Olympian soon finds herself a second class citizen. She does not receive equal training, coaching, facilities, nor anything else. The men's teams train under atmospheric conditions similar to those under which they will compete (as happened in the 1968 Olympics where the men trained in Oregon while the women trained in New England). The men's teams travel to Europe for pre-Olympic meets so that they can measure their performance against their future competitors. The women, if they are lucky, compete against their teammates. The list of inequities is long. But there are some things that an Olympian may be sure of when she places herself in the hands of the governing body of Olympic sports. She is chaperoned. She has to take a "sex test." She receives the second best coaches (the best go to the men), and she is not allowed to speak freely about the conditions under which she labors. Anne Henning, outspoken U.S. women's speed skating coach, was severely censored last winter for such a "lapse." The third factor in the success or failure of the U.S. women's teams is the media. They are responsible for bringing the Olympics to millions, and their attitudes strongly influence perceptions of the games. Their treatment of the women's teams has been uniformly poor. Before the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, the U.S. media kept two entirely separate sets of scores for the Olympics, the men's and the women's. The reason was that a combined score, with the extremely strong Soviet women's teams, would have shown the U.S. not as strong as the media pretended. The U.S. men traditionally dominated their events, but including the women's scores would make the communist countries look stronger. In 1968, this changed as the communist countries began to field stronger men's teams. Suddenly the U.S. men needed the medal production of the women to keep them in first place. The "sex test" was also introduced in 1968. The Soviets caught on to single scoring first and immediately elevated their women's programs. As a result they "won" the 1972 Munich Olympics. East Germany, Romania and others jumped on the bandwagon, and the results were evident in Montreal. Even though the women's medals were needed for an American victory, the U.S. media continued to treat the women's team as an afterthought. Invariably, pre-Olympic meets for men received extensive coverage while the women's pre- Olympic meet results were relegated to the back pages in tiny print. And when women were mentioned, Sports Illustrated writers and ABC commentators assured the world that U.S. women would perform better than ever. The truth was that they were, if anything, weaker than ever. U.S. record holders like Shirley Babashoff, Jan Merrill, Francie LaRue, Debra Sapenter and Jane Fredrichs became, in the eyes of the media, potential gold medal winners. Although these were American record holders, theirs were below the World records-sometimes way below. In fairness, the media hyped the men's track and field team, too. Since the great things expected of them failed to occur, ABC soon began devoting less and less time to covering the women. Legislation alone will not cure the problems faced by American women athletes. Laws will not change the attitudes of the U.S. Olympic Committee or the media. Help is not on the way. Woman's fight for equality in athletics has just begun. FREE PREGNANCY TESTING & INFORMATION 868 - 4483 BIRKENSTOCKS AT THE HOBBITHOLE HEAITH FOOD STORE 1715 S. SHEPARD Made by Designed by BIHKEMSTOCK NATURE The Houston Women's Health Collective is compiling a referral service, Our goal is to know which doctors women are going to and what quality of medical care women are receiving. We are particularly interested in OB/Gyn doctors, but also are taking information on GP's, dentists and any doctors who are outstanding-good or bad. Our files are open to anyone who is looking for a doctor. Every woman has had a bad experience with a doctor. We are interested in your horror stories but we are particularly interested in locating good doc tors so that we can help every woman find a doctor to whom she can relate. In addition to our doctor survey, we have information on low-cost clinic health care in Houston. We ask every woman who reads Breakthrough to participate in our referral service. Make copies of our questionnaire for your friends to fill out. We want doctor referrals from every woman we can reach. Please mail completed questionnaires to: Houston Breakthrough, Doctor Files, P.O. Box 88072, Houston 77004. DOCTOR SURVEY Name of Doctor. Office Address Type of Doctor: OB/Gyn GP other Fee for the first visit Date of most recent visit. Why did you consult a doctor? Routine pap smear, infection Birth control— other _yaginal Did doctor take a thorough medical history from you?__ Did doctor do a pap smear? If not, why not?__ Did doctor advise you to have a pap smear done every year?_ Did doctor explain everything she or he did to you, answering all your questions to your satisfaction? Did you feel comfortable discussing your symptoms with this doctor? Did doctor encourage you by her or his attitude and words to learn more about your body and the health problem for which you sought the doctor's advice? If doctor prescribed any drugs for you, did she or he identify and describe the drugs to your satisfaction? Did doctor fitting a diaphragm show you how to insert it properly and check to see that it is in place to your satisfaction? Did doctor inserting an IUD discuss its risks with you? Did doctor prescribing the Pill discuss known harmful side effects and risks with you? Did doctor do a breast exam?_ Did she or he show you how to examine your own breasts for lumps and advise you to do it monthly? Did doctor discuss nutrition or exercise at all in relation to your health problem? Will this doctor administer birth control to any woman who asks for it? yes no married women only adult women (over 18) only. don't know Does this doctor take medicare and medicaid patients? yes just medicare just medicaid neither Did you feel comfortable discussing your symptoms with this doctor? Did doctor say or do anything sexually offensive to you? If so, please elaborate Do you plan to return to this doctor?. Do you recommend that other women seek the advice of this doctor? Why or why not? We welcome all of your comments. Please attach additional paper. Thank you for your part in helping Houston women get better health care. Mail your completed questionnaire to: Houston Breakthrough, Doctor Files, P.O. Box 88072, Houston, 77004. 13