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Breakthrough 1976-08
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Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 7. August 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976). Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3194

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 7, August 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date August 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_519g.jpg
Transcript Insist on individual files By Marjory Barnhart "You have a charge account at Neiman-Marcus? In your own name?" The employee at the Credit Bureau of Greater Houston was incredulous. After the Equal Credit Opportunity Act went into effect October 28, 1975, many women went ahead and established a separate credit file, one apart from their husbands, women wrote and called the credit bureau (652-3434) and reported their employment background, bank account numbers and oil company and department store charge card numbers. While the provision splitting credit files from family units is included in the ECOA, the section regarding individual credit files will not become effective until October, 1976. During the present year of transition, the credit bureau is still maintaining family unit files. Under this system all account information is filed under the husband's name. If a woman had credit before her marriage, those records are marked with an asterisk. The credit for those accounts goes to the husband unless she specifi cally calls the credit bureau and requests her own file. It is to her advantage to do so. In the event of separation, divorce, or the husband's death, a woman can suddenly find that she has no credit. Some stores automatically ask a recently widowed woman to return her charge card. Separated or divorced women have also had a rude awakening to discover that after years of hard work, there is no record of their financial contribution. Before the ECOA went into effect, creditors limited accounts to one member of a family. Now both spouses can obtain credit if they prove financial responsibility. This could be a great advantage to the businesses . A working couple with two charge accounts at the same store has increased purchasing power. Laura Oren, president of the Houston Area Feminist Federal Credit Union, favors separate files because they give businesses a more realistic picture of contribution of the wife to the family's economy. "In effect," she says, "you are making business rational. Why throw away an account that would be a good risk?" The proposed changes would be a disadvantage mainly to the credit bureaus, who would face a new filing system and additional paperwork without monetary profit. The plan was to require creditors to mail out a form in November, 1976, asking joint account holders if they wish to have separate files. The law would also apply to mortgage bond holders. Both spouses could request individual records. Creditors see these new requirements as an unnecessary expense. Resistance to the plan has caused hesitation on the part of the Federal Reserve Board. More letters are needed regarding the amendment to the ECOA The Houston Area Feminist Federal Credit Union (HAFFCU) urges public comment on this matter. When writing, cite Docket R-0038 and write to: Secretary of the Board of Governors Federal Reserve Board Washington, D.C. 20551 Send copies of your letters to: HAFFCU 2418 Travis Houston, Tx. 77006 Subscribe TODAY to Breakthrough EUROPEAN SKIN CARE/HAIR REMOVAL/MAKE-UP SERVICES Basic Facial according to skin type - including acne: Includes - analysis, ionized steam mist, deep pore cleansing, high frequency stimulation, massage, mask, firming & toning spray, eye & lip make-up $21.00 Paraffin Facial for dry, sensitive, aging, and clogged skins: Includes - basic facial techniques plus a paraffin facial & neck mask with it's specialized sauna, moisturizing. & firming effects $31.00 Ionization Series for superficial dryness & fine lines: Includes - basic facial techniques plus restoration of moisture to superficial skin layers by a specialized deep penetration process, also firms & tones skin tissues. Series of Three $75.00 Hair Removal - European Wax Method diminishes hair growth 8c softens skin: Legs (entire) $31.00 Legs (knees down) $21.00 Bikini Line $10.00 Under Arms $10.00 Facial Areas $ 5.00 & up Personalized Make-Up Includes - structural analysis, cleansing, C02 spray for firming & toning, complete make-up $15.00 Paraffin Glove for dry, chapped & arthritic hand conditions: Includes - cleansing, massage, & paraffin wax gbve with it's specialized moisturizing & soothing qualities - actually seals in moisture, forearms included $15.00 Cellulrfe Treatment for upper leg & hip areas: Includes - bnized steam mist, high frequency stimulation, deep kneading massage, indepth penetration of specialized treatment vial & toning spray $35.00 Eyebrow Arch $5.00 Lash Tint $5.00 Brow Tint $5.00 Specialized Cathiolyse Series available for excessive oil, deep dehydration, pigmentation, and acne Gift Certificates Available 401 Avondale/At Fast Eddie's Haircut Par lor/Houston, Texas 77006/(713) 526-7555 Ms. Terry Higgs GARY HILL A man on our side Support Our Advertisers By Mary Lu Abbott Reporter, Life Style Houston Chronicle Editor's note: We never met Chronicle reporter Gary K. Hill, but we wished we had. His bylines would surprisingly appear in the Life Style section on stories that ranged from house- husbands to feminist law firms. He earned a "pat" in the last issue of Breakthrough for an article he wrote on gains girls and women were making in athletics. At the time of his death in early June, Hill was writing a story on the opening of Women's Hospital, a facility offering family-centered maternity care. His Life Style colleague, Mary Lu Abbott, completed his last assignment. To us, Hill was a man on our side, someone sensitive to our issues. We will miss his bylines. We asked Mary Lu Abbott to share her feelings with us about him. Chronicle reporter Gary K. Hill was a rare man, one who dared to show that he cared about others. He died struggling with an intruder in his home. Ironically, Hill was the type who would have sat and listened to the burglar's tale of woe. Hill came to the Chronicle copy desk from Fort Worth in 1972 and transferred into the Life Style section as a feature writer two years later. Fellow male reporters ribbed him about working on "the women's pages." He volleyed the joshing well because he thought the Life Style stories showed sensitivity. He liked to write about people more than events. He was the first man ever assigned to Life Style and we women loved to refer to him as "our token male." He enjoyed our teasing--he was big enough to take it in fun. Hill was a West Texas cowboy at heart and disliked the city, its frantic pace, its closed doors, its fight-for-yourself atti tude. He liked to take time living. And so he saw a story in nearly everything, even the common-day lives and activities: the ice cream man in Montrose, kids and sno-cones, marbles that once fascinated children. Hill wrote a lament over the disappearance of lightning bugs in the city and the carefree childhood days of chasing the little "flashing lanterns." Hill was into consciousness- raising beyond the point of sexism-he was trying to tune into all thoughts. He was on the trail to a better self, constantly seeking reasons for his actions, trying to establish meaningful relationships with his family and friends. He was a women's rights advocate, outspoken and incensed at discriminatory practices. He was irate when he heard some women could not get library cards in their own names. To some, the problem was minor, but to Hill it was worth spending time to help change. Those whom Hill wrote about often became his good friends, like the truck driver he hopped a ride with to New Mexico for a story on the asphalt cowboy. He always listened the extra minute, even the added hour, to gain a closer glimpse at a person's inner self. Hill couldn't take just one quick glance at a story, his editor says. "He examined all angles, like holding dice in his hand and seeing all their sides. It was painful to him to extract what was the best angle to tell. He had to un-entangle himself." To him, every tidbit of a person's life was important. One day a couple with a young child wandered into the Chronicle office. They were stranded in Houston, without money and were having trouble with Travelers Aid in getting transportation home. Hill listened to all their troubles, asked questions and wrote a story. He intervened personally with Travelers Aid to assure their help and, thanks to him, they soon were on their way home. They survived their encounter with the city. Gary K. Hill didn't.