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Breakthrough 1976-08
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Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 6. August 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976). Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3193

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 6, August 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date August 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_519f.jpg
Transcript Housing Discri initiation Is Illegal ICall: 222-5411 City of Houston Fair Housing Division Aguide to Women's Businesses in Houston A comprehensive listing of Houston area businesses which are managed by women or at least 50% owned by women. Listings are now being gathered and verified. If you would like to be contacted, fill out the form below and mail. Or jot down someone you know, and we'll contact her. There is no charge to be listed. Thanks to continuing support from the women of Houston, we anticipate publishing the guide in the near future. Watch for the announcement in your local feminist media. Name of Woman Abstractors Accountants Advertising counselors Agricultural consultants Air conditioning repairpersons Antique dealers Apartment locators Appraisers Architects Art dealers Artists Astrologists Attorneys Automobile repairpersons Automobile salespersons Bakers Bar owners Boat builders Booksellers Cabinet makers Candle makers Carpenters Carpet weavers Child carepersons Child guidance counselors Chiropractors Clock repairpersons Clothiers Collection agents Communications consultants Computer programmers Concrete finishers Construction contractors Craftspersons Decorators Dentists Dermatologists Designers Doctors Dog groomers Doughnu t makers Draftpersons Drama teachers Dressmakers Driving instructors Druggists Dry Cleaners Economic consultants Educational consultants Electricians Electrologists Engineers Engravers Entertainers Family Relations counselors Name of Business.. Type of Business- Address of Business Business (or home) Phone Pokey Anderson ^ Mail to: 1531 Maryland, No. 4 O Houston, Texas 77006 Texas targeted for texts By Marjorie Randal Two little boys and a man fish from a motorboat. A small girl wearing a ruffled nightie stares wistfully alone at a window. A woman uses a magnifier to apply make-up. A man uses one in an experiment. Enter the world of Texas schoolbooks. It is a world where men and boys move, create, fix, work and achieve. But women and girls watch, wait, seek help and weep. Texas may be the most important state in a national fight to rid children's texts of this insidious view of "the way it's spozed to be." That's because Texas is one of only about a dozen states to adopt a list of approved public school texts at the state level. And since it is one of the most populous states, Texas is a pretty big schoolbook customer. So what goes on at Texas Education Agency (TEA) hearings like the one set for August 16—18 in Austin is very important to the big publishing houses. Failing to get a third grade arithmetic text approved in Austin can have more impact on a New York publisher than anything any reviewer could ever say. Sexism in American textbooks is rampant. We all looked at these books for years, but few of us could see that. As youngsters we read of male characters doing practically everything that was successful, fun, or even interesting. Maybe we thought that women and girls would have their turn on another page. But page after page, book after book, year after year, we never got our turn. Joy Senter of Friendswood, a collector of old textbooks, wrote an article last year detailing her findings that the frequency of male representation and pre-empting of active roles has increased from the 1940's. Only recently has the trend started to reverse with the rising consciousness of sexism generally. Since the early 1970's, feminists have been publishing studies of sexism in teaching and library materials and lists of non- sexist books for kids. Texas has been the scene of increasing activity in reviewing of texts for sexual bias during the past five years. Texas has maintained a long-standing process for citizen input into textbook selection. The TEA requires each publisher who submits a book for adoption to put a copy in each of 20 cities around the state for public inspection. In TEA jargon, a person "protests" a book's adoption by filing a "bill of particulars" by a certain date. The publisher must then respond in writing to each bill. Finally, the TEA conducts hearings before the State Textbook Selection Committee-15 teachers, most of whom were appointed for their honor, not their expertise. Texas feminists first testified before the TEA on the level of sexism in textbooks in 1972. After the committee makes its selections, the individual school districts make their choices of specific titles. Any books a district wants which are not on the list must be bought with local funds. Texas feminists first took advantage of this input procedure in 1972. Women including Kay Why burn of Houston wrote bills of particulars on American history texts. The next year, some 25 women and a handful of men from Houston, Dallas, San Antonio and Austin wrote bills. And nine testified at the hearings. By 1974, a "Continuing Task Force on Education for Women" had been formed by some Houston area members of NOW. Some 150 persons wrote more than 400 bills, and 24 per sons testified. It was a big year for textbook adoption-more than 700 items. But 1974 was also the year Linda Eichblatt opened her newspaper one December morning to discover that she was named a defendant in a $30 million suit by Economy Publishers of Oklahoma City. Economy alleged Eichblatt conspired with a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) and an independent witness to criticize the publisher's books for too much violence. The brief said that Economy's suit had nothing to do with their criticism of sexism. Four months later, Economy dropped their suit but only after attempting and failing to get defendants to agree not to counter- sue. Last year, the Task Force first presented college professors as "expert witnesses"-lucky tactical development, since the publishers also first introduced their "expert" academicians. Last year, a significant reduction could be seen in the level of sexism in the books up for adoption. By then, three of the big publishing houses-Holt, Rinehart and Winston, McGraw- Hill and Scott, Foresman-had issued guidelines on reducing sexism in their products. But some firms were still sorely lagging on making revisions due to the sizable expense. This year some 275 books are up for adoption. They cover several high school subjects, languages, dictionaries and one category labeled "fundamentals of the free enterprise system." NOW has again co-ordinated a comprehensive review of the list, this time with 133 persons filing 277 bills, by July 9. Some reviewers found their books non- sexist and did not write bills. Others discovered new permutations of sexism. There are some publishers being criticized for the first time this year. It is hard to predict the flavor of the coming hearing. But NOW will be prepared. Its Task Force will rendezvous in Austin the night before the opening to map strategy.