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Breakthrough 1976-08
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Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 4. August 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3191.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976). Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3191

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-08 - Page 4, August 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3208/show/3191.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-08
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date August 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 20 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_519d.jpg
Transcript Convention women compromise By Tom Rowan "Hi! My name is Jimmy Carter and I'm running for President." This announcement from the nominee came as no surprise to 4,977 delegates and alternates who had worked or negotiated to come to the Democratic Convention in New York City. According to the cynical media, and as interpreted by its millions of myopic followers, there were no surprises generated by this gathering of the faithful waiting to be led back to the promised land. Unless, of course, you were female. One of the significant events and about the only behind-the- scenes excitement was the move by the Democratic Women's Caucus to advance their demands for feminist and social issues. Just across the street from Madison Square Garden, the Stat/er Hilton Hotel was both the headquarters for the convention and the location of the planned Sunday afternoon and Monday morning Women's Caucus meetings. The Women's Caucus focused on three major topics: the Platform, the Rules and also attempts to obtain specific commitments from Governor Carter on feminist and social related issues. Jimmy Carter was so determined to have a smooth- appearing convention that he was receptive to several negotiated compromises. THE PLATFORM: The Platform Committee, consisting of 154 members, 48% of whom were women, had worked prior to the convention on the goals and policies to be espoused by the Democratic party. HUBERT WHO? THE RULES: At the June 18 meeting of the Rules Committee, Jane Patterson, committee member from North Carolina, submitted minority report number three on I behalf of the Women's Caucus. ' The initial feminist version specified that "...(the National Convention) shall require equal division between delegates, men and women..." at the 1980 National Democratic Convention. The Rules Committee instead supported (by a 66Y4 to 46Y2 vote) a substitute resolution, offered by Gov. Averell Harriman, promoting equal division with implementation promoted by state parties. By the time of the first Women's Caucus meeting on Sunday, July 11, a negotiating team of 40 had been called together by Carter to discuss the rules minority report. This was an effort to solidify this support of female delegates, but more importantly, to avoid a public floor fight on the issue. At the July 11 afternoon meeting of the Women's Caucus, Brooklyn Congresswoman, Bella Abzug reported that "President elect" Carter was committed to passage of the Equal Rights A- mendment and that he promised to recruit more women for leadership in his campaign and in the Democratic Party. Carter is reported to oppose a system of actual or implied "mandatory quotas." NOW National President, Karen de Crow, took a floor mike to respond that she too was at the meeting with Carter and felt that women should be unyielding in their demands for 50-50 representation. A straw vote supported that position martha was right unanimously. As previously planned, the Women's Caucus was to meet again on Monday morning. Coincidentally, Carter called for the second meeting with a smaller group of women at the same time. Gov. Carter was hoping to compromise on the language and to eliminate the minority report altogether. Meanwhile, back at the Statler Hilton, several hundred of the Women's Caucus were becoming entangled in endless parliamentary motions and feeling ran strong for support of the equal representation, or 50-50, issue. However, many prominent as well as elected women were pragmatically in favor of agreeing to the pending Carter compromise. Rep. Shirley Chisholm (D- NY) was quite resolved in her belief that the pending compromise was the best arrangement that could be obtained at this time. She argued that a Democratic presidency, plus significant gains for women, were worthy of political compromise. Distressed at the thought of a floor fight when actual voting strength on women's issues was unknown, Rep. Chisholm commented that "Compromise is the highest of all political arts...(We) should have learned our lesson from the...1972 campaign!" Gloria Allred, alternate delegate from California and spokesperson for the California National Women's Political Caucus, was leading much of the support for the equal representation issue and was a proponent of taking the issue to the floor. Was she endorsing a quota system? "No, this (50-50) issue would be the first step, not towards a quota system, but to e- quality. God created one-half men and one-half women and that was not considered a quota!" On the issue of compromise, have the other women's political leaders been subverted? "The issue is not compromise-it is equality. The (negotiators) have lost their focus..." With only a few minutes left before the room had to be vacated, the negotiating team entered; the microphone was hastily turned over to Rep. Abzug. "Our demands have been responded to in full," Abzug reported. She briefly outlined nine points on which Gov. Carter had made concessions. Most of these were more specific than previous commitments and several new items had been added. (See box below.) Because of the shortness of time and suddenness of exposure to these nine Carter Commitments, it was decided to adjourn until the next morning (Wednesday) and at that time, with copies of the new proposal in hand, and delegates notified of the meeting so that a larger consensus would be available, vote acceptance or rejection of these points. Following the events of that day, word went out from the Carter organization to female Carter delegates to be present at the next day's meeting to vote for Carter's proposal. Before a crowd that packed the Hilton's meeting room, the assembled delegates and supporters heard impassioned endorsement of the Carter position from Abzug, Chisholm, Friedan and equally powerful, articulate support of 50-50 representation from Karen de Crow. When the vote was taken, they endorsed the nine commitments and thus pulled the Women's Caucus into harmony with the other smooth- flowing convention activities. |i*|f l|i|*g| ■■% As a precaution, however, Gloria Allred of California proposed and received approval of a resolution which states "if at the 1978 mid-term convention there is not equal representation be- $ LEARN TO QUILT Classes Start Sept. 9, 10, 11 w "Antiques *Quilts "China GREAT EXPECTATIONS n18 I tween delegate men and delegate women, then be it resolved by the Women's Caucus that the President (presuming it is Carter) and all Democratic Party officials support a rule requiring equal division between delegate women and delegate men at future conventions and their resolution be forwarded to the Presi- W76 Win With Women dent and Party Chairperson." As a postscript, Allred was asked why she and others capitulated after developing such a strong stance on the 50-50 issue. She felt that significant gains had actually been offered, but also "it has strong support from elected women officials—in fact, support came from all direc- tions-too much to wage a floor fight." No analysis is complete without numbers and percentages. But we'll keep it simple and brief. There were actually 1,036 (34%) female delegates and 740 (39%) alternates. This figure is less than the 37% representation in 1972 but still above the 13% represented back in 1968. Three-fourths of these women are employed outside the home (mostly teachers); 37% have run for public office and 21% now hold public office. Carter was reported to have told the women who met with him that what Lyndon Johnson did for Civil Rights in America, he-Carter-wants to do for women's rights. Many women felt they were entitled to both 50-50 representation and the Carter commitments. They left hoping for the best, resolving not to give any candidate more than one chance to fulfill promises, promises. ************** Victoria Woodhull formed her own political party and ran for President of the United States in 1872. •**•*•*•****•* Town&Country Village I. The Democratic Party A. Rules Report: Recommended Language Changes: "It is hereby resolved that consistent with the traditions of the Democratic Party that the Calls to the 1978 Mid-Term Convention and future Conventions shall promote equal division between delegate men and delegate women from all states and territories. The National Party shall encourage and assist State parties to adopt provisions to achieve this goal in their delegate selection plans." B. Women's Division: The Women's Division, which will not be subservient to the Chair of the Party, will be strengthened by adequate staff and funding enabling it to promote and implement feminist objectives. C. Commissions and Committees: All Commissions and Committees of the Democratic Party will have full representation of women, including the Winograd Commission and Judicial Council. II. The Campaign and the Administration A. Equal Rights Amendment: Governor Carter committed himself to making the passage of the ERA a major part of his campaign. He also stated that he would use his office, if elected President, to secure ratification. B. Strategy Committee: The Democratic Women's Caucus will establish a Strategy Committee representative of its constituencies. Governor Carter has agreed to consult personally with a smaller representative group from this Committee. C. High-Level Posts: Governor Carter stated that the Women's Caucus can depend on his appointment of women to Cabinet posts, throughout the judiciary system, and that women will be a part of the Committee that will propose names for the judicial posts. His judicial appointments will be on merit, quality, and not as political pay-offs. He also stated that he would seriously consider a woman for the next opening on the U.S. Supreme Court. D. Talent Bank: The Democratic Women's Caucus will help to set up a Talent Bank of women listing their areas of expertise and skills, for consideration to key posts. E. Working Women: Governor Carter expressed his commitment to compensatory action, necessary for women, as well as minorities, to overcome patterns of past discrimination in employment. F. Legal Barriers: Governor Carter stated that a major portion of his commitment to the nation is the elimination of the remaining legal barriers against women.