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Houston Breakthrough 1979-10
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough 1979-10 - Page 11. October 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3067.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-10 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3067

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-10 - Page 11, October 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3067.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-10
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_554ak.jpg
Transcript COUNCIL RACES, continued from page 9 implies Two other women candidates in council races are running against incumbents. Helen Hopkins (District E) received an endorsement from the HCWPC and Ginia Wright (At-Large, Position 1)was endorsed by the HCD. Anne Wheeler (District H) won endorsements from both groups. Helen Hopkins Helen Hopkins says she is getting her old yard signs out of the garage where they've been stored "just in case" she got the urge to take on Frank Mancuso, again. In 1975, Hopkins was the only one to run against the former major league baseball player and familiar face on council since 1962. She polled 40% of the votes in a city-wide race and won over 60,000 votes, a fact she says the local media have "scrupulously" avoided mentioning. "That's an impressive figure,"she says. "If someone was looking for a potential winner, they could pick up on that fact and say, 'Hey, she does have a chance.' ' Hopkins feels the media have "fought hard to make us all sound alike" in their reporting on the District E race. Hopkins has been a leader of Citizens for Flood Control, a group of homemakers and residents who have protested the lack of adequate drainage and the lack of responsiveness of city and county governments to their problems. They called a mass meeting back in 1975 to get the attention of local officials. "We filled a church with 500 people - angry and distressed homeowners -but it had no effect on our office holders." That's when Hopkins first decided to run against Mancuso. She raised $20,000 for that at-large race. This year her friends in Citizens for Flood Control raised her $500 filing fee and the $5000 in her campaign chest. "I'm only $12 over budget at the moment," she says. Her funding has come in donations of $10 or less. She's had only one $25, one $50 and one $150 contribution. "To me, democracy should not cost a lot of money." Hopkins obviously has no budget for billboards but says she wouldn't put them up even if she did. "I'm against billboards. I think they should all come down. They are so ugly. Here in south-east Houston we have enough of a blithe along the Gulf Freeway." On another matter, Hopkins points out of the campaigns' little ironies "Isn't it interesting, that the Chamber of Commerce, the police and fire fighters and the labor unions are all backing the incumbents. Isn't it interesting that both labor and big business are backing the same people. I can't understand how they both figure they're their men. Ginia Wright Ginia Wright was past president of the Houston City Council of PTA's, an experience that she says "politicized" her. Anticipating the stereotypes people have of PTA workers, Wright is quick to say, "We were not cookie baking types. We learned about the legislative process by preparing for and participating in hearings in Austin and in Washington. If it had not been for the PTA, I would not be running for city council today." This is Wright's second bid for office. She lost an HISD board seat two years ago by 196 votes. She spent $5000 on her race, her opponent spent $20,000. She likes to tell him his 195 votes cost him $15,000. "You don't need the money if you have the votes," Wright feels. She is confident about unseating Jim Westmoreland and took on an at-large race against him rather that a District A race against Mc Kaskle because she felt Westmoreland was the most "vulnerable" of the two. "People know his name, but they don't know what he does." // anything, she Wright calls her opponent "The Phantom." She has not met him out campaigning. He shouldn't be so sure of himself, you think she's thinking. Ginia ( as in Vir-ginia) Wright feels she has spent 12 years grooming for an elected position. One Austin legislator, impressed with her ability as an expert witness, encouraged her to seek office. "When I told him I was running against an incumbent, all he could say is You've got guts.' " As head of the PTA, Wrights spoke up for returning schools to the semester system, programs for pregnant teenagers ("I am pro-choice, she adds"), and was a strong advocate for sex education in the schools "with appropriate teachers and in an appropriate setting, not just in the gym class on the bleachers on a rainy day." She is proud of the fact that through PTA efforts "we have gotten home and family living courses down to the sixth grade." Like Hopkins, Wright is astounded to see the incumbents endorsed by unions and even the minority groups. On their questionnaires, these groups seemed to be looking for change candidates. Yet they are backing the old order," she says with disappointment. "I want the endorsement of the people," she says. "If they really want a change in city government, they should vote WRIGHT." Anne Wheeler Anne Wheeler's six and nine -year -old daughters each say they want to be a "tax lady" when they grow up. That's because their mother, a school teacher by profession, is such an effective spokesperson for the tax reform movement. As chair of the Taxpayer's Political Action Committee (for the record, their activities bear no resemblance to the Proposition 13 antics), Wheeler says her group took up the tax fight for the inner city — for the low to moderate income groups and to bring about a fair tax system since the city had no tax system. "They just go around and hot spot certain areas, like West End-Cottage Grove — raise the taxes 1000% and force those on fixed incomes to sell. The developers run this city," she says emphatically, "and they want this land for expensive townhouses, condiminiums, and businesses." Her group tried for over a year to work out the inequities through City Hall. "They just laughed in our face. They said we didn't have a tax problem (despite the fact that certain areas hadn't had their taxes raised in 25 years). So, her group went the City Charter route and effected a change through legal means to bring about a re-evaluation for the whole city. They came up with a formula that wouldn't put a burden on poor neighborhoods. "It evened things out. The only thing that gave us this power was to effect a charter change. Now, they're not laughing at us any more and they're all talking about fair and equitable taxes in their campaigns. Because of her work in the forefront of the tax reform movement, Wheeler has attracted everyone from the "very, very conservative to the very, very liberal" in her campaign. She's running against a state legislator whom she feels has name recognition, but not all of it is positive, she feels. People remember Herman Lauhoff as the one who sponsored a bill to raise the City of Houston's Mayor's salary to $72,000, making him the highest paid mayor in the country and he proposed legislation increasing the salaries of city council members. Her opponent also was responsible for the MTA bill that called for the appointment rather than the election of MTA board members. "I argued against a Mayor being able to appoint his cronies. He told me electing them would just bring politics into it. Then, 'let's have the governor appoint all state legislators,' I told Lauhoff. We support Eleanor Tinsley for City Council because she has a proven record of leadership and accomplishment for women. As President of the Texas Council of Child Welfare Boards, she secured passage of legislation to fund foster care for neglected and abused children not previously covered by AFDC. As President of the Houston School Board, she initiated project EVE to provide non-stereotyped vocational training for women. She had the Deans of Women raised to the rank of assistant principals, equal in pay and status to their male counterparts. She was a strong supporter of the High School for the Perfc Mining Arts, the Young Mother's Program and she chaired the committee that established our Community College. Melba Ann Barr Pat Brink Rema Lou Brown Valerie Burson Twiss Butler Pat Cearsy Jean Childers Barbara Cigainero Martha N. Coats Joyce Cragg Jacqueline Cronquist Betti Rose Driscoll Judy Elders Barbara Friedman Beatrice Mladenka-Fowler Carol Grande Peggy Hall Frances Hicks Diane W. Kilpatrick Benegene Kring Karen Loper Brenda Loudermilk Polly Marsters Linda May Marge Miller Renee Rabb Frances Swartsfager Elayne Tatar Ella Tyler Nikki Van Hightower Alice E. Whatley Merylin Whited Evie Whitsett Nancy Winslow Iris Zeismore ELEANOR TINSLEY AT LARGE POSITION TWO Pol. adv. paid by Eleanor Tinsley Campaign Committee, Dick and Dianne Bynum, Craig Washinton, Treasurers. Opportunities For Scientists and Engineers As NASA ASTRONAUT Candidates Individuals with backgrounds in engineering, biological, or physical sciences, or mathematics are sought by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for Pilot and Mission Specialist Astronaut Candidate positions at the Johnson Space Center; Houston, Texas. Pilot Astronauts serve as both Shuttle Commanders and Pilots. The commander is responsible for the space vehicle, crew, mission success, and flight safety. The Pilot assists the Commander in controlling and operating the Shuttle. Mission Specialist Astronauts are responsible for coordinating with the Commander and Pilot Shuttle operations such as crew activity planning, consumables usage, and other Shuttle activities affecting experiment operations. All applicants must have received at least a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution in engineering, biological or physical science, or mathematics no later than December 1, 1979. Advanced degrees are desired. Pilot candidates must also have at least 1,000 hours Pilot-ln-Command time in high-performance jet aircraft, and be able to pass a NASA space flight physical. Mission Specialist candidates, in addition to the degree, must have at least 3 years related experience. An advanced degree may be substituted for experience (MS for 1 year, PHD for 3 years). They must also pass a NASA space flight physical. Selected applicants will be assigned to the Johnson Space Center for a one-year training and evaluation assignment. Those who successfully complete the assignment will be selected as Astronauts. Completed applications will be accepted only between October 1 and December 1, 1979. For an application package, write: Astronaut Candidate Program Code AHX NASA - Johnson Space Center Houston, Tx 77058 NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration An Equal Opportunity Employer HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 11 OCTOBER 1979