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Houston Breakthrough, October 1979
Page 10
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Houston Breakthrough, October 1979 - Page 10. October 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3066.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1979). Houston Breakthrough, October 1979 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3066

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1979 - Page 10, October 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3066.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
File Name femin_201109_554aj.jpg
Transcript Her campaign literature explains that White, "of the West Texas Weatherfords, . . . learned early the importance of independence . . . that led her beyond the confines of debutante balls and the role of housewife." White believes in the importance of name recognition. She makes a practice of spelling out her name for audiences and having them repeat it after her. Instead of campaign buttons, she intends to hand out rape whistles inscribed "Bette." Because she is short on finances, White is relying heavily on key individuals to contribute services and expertise. "People have donated everything from money to music," she said. Her campaign fund stands at about $7500. At a meeting of Woman to Woman, an informal group of mostly church- affiliated women, White was asked what her priorities as mayor would be. "The main thing," she replied, "is to put those who didn't believe to shame." Following Eleanor Tinsley, who described her civic involvement and gave specifics of how her election to city council would benefit women, White said: "My approach (to this group) will be really different from Eleanor's but that's to be expected. That's probably why she's running for city council and I'm running for mayor." Asked why she did not first run for city council, White replied, "I was Community Development Commissioner and I found out then what it means to have a title after your name. That gave me a stepping stone. The mayor would call me up, I got letters . . . the Texas legislature acknowledged me." She described the difficulties and dangers of running for office. "I've come to this through a lot of work and loneliness. . . It's a thankless job. I had the guts," she said, "when everybody laughed in my face ... It's been very hard but it's also made me the kind of person I am today and I feel good about that." White's life was threatened, she claimed, after she announced for mayor, and she was offered round-the-clock security. Then, at a late-night press conference at the Orchard Park apartments, she reported that while she was handing out rape whistles she was confronted by a man wielding "a six-inch switchblade." "It was then I realized I was willing to give my life for what I believe in," asserted White. Debby Leonard "Working people keep Houston running. Working people should run Houston," is the slogan of mayoral candidate Debby Leonard, who has previously run for mayor and governor of Texas. Leonard is a local leader of the Socialist Workers Party. An oil worker of Atlantic Richfield's Houston refinery, she is a former president of the Houston Coalition of Labor Union Women. She feels that decisions which affect us all are not made openly, but are carried out "secretly, by the small minority who own the corporations and the banks." She does not think that the Democratic and Republican parties represent the interests of working people, and advocates a labor party, launched by the unions. Campaign funding runs to less than $5,000. "If we had a $100-a-plate fund- raising dinner," said Leonard, "no one would come, because the people who support me can't afford that." "I don't expect to be the next mayor," she told Breakthrough. "Every vote for me is important because it is a challenge to the way the government is run. "You don't have to be a socialist to vote for me. What we are saying is that there is an alternative. Women and minorities should break away and challenge the system as it exists now." Jewell Davis Lemons Beer and barbecue are recommended highly by mayoral candidate Jewell Davis Lemons, a 70-year-old attorney. Describing herself as a "beer and barbecue girl," Lemons cautioned that if anyone approaches who is against decency and Christianity, "Walk away. Don't drink your beer and eat your barbecue with them." Lemons wants "Christian people" to vote for her as "a protest against indecency. I am for everything the pope is for, and I am against everything that Madelyn Murray O'Hair is for," claimed Lemons. Her campaign budget so far totals $1,850. That includes her $1,250 filing fee, $100 for signs and $500 for printing cards. Her only contribution to date has been from the man who sells papers at the 24-hour newsstand at the corner of Bellaire and Gessner. He gave her a Susan B. Anthony dollar. She is very proud of this contribution and does not want to spend it. "I do not worship money," said Lemons, "but I welcome contributions from Christian people. I don't want contributions from pornographers." Contributions, from pornographers and/or Christians, have been in short supply for all three women in the mayoral race. Between them, they will spend less than $10,000, or about one percent of the total campaign funds of the nine candidates. Debby Leonard collected signatures in lieu of a filing fee. She will spend about $800 on brochures. Bette Graham White called her campaign financial status "desperate" and said, "we have not been able to generate any cash flow." Larry Robinson Larry Robinson is running for mayor, again. It cost him $50,000 to be defeated in 1977, and he was the first contender to start spending money in this year's race. (He was the one appearing on TV in September, before it was even certain we would have a Nov. 6 election.) He's not saying how much he's spending this time around. He would only say that "several thousands have been spent and several thousand more will be spent." C. Leon Pickett A well-known figure at City Hall, C. Leon Pickett never misses a city council meeting, and is always on the agenda to speak. He writes up all the dastardly deeds of city officials in his monthly, The Pickett Line. But "nobody takes him seriously," said Bill Balleza on KHOU-TV. "He is a self-styled critic of city council—some people call him the town cryer." He ran for governor in 1972 and for mayor in 1977. This is the first time he has paid the filing fee. Lawrence Andrew Sims A law student and file clerk with Full- bright and Jaworski, Lawrence Sims could not be reached by Breakthrough. Citizens Anti-Nuclear Information Team (CAN-IT) sent the following questionnaire to all candidates running in the city elections: 1. Would you approve transportation of nuclear waste through the city of Houston? Along nearby highways? 2. Do you approve contruction by Houston Lighting & Power of a nuclear power plant at Aliens Creek, 45 miles from downtown Houston? 3. Nuclear power plants produce no electricity for 5 to 15 years, if ever. HL&P now passes on much of the cost to ratepayers through an allowance in its rate base for Construction Work in Prograss (CWIP). Should present ratepayers continue to pay the cost of these plants—thus being forced to invest in a speculation in which they bear risk but hold no equity? They received the following replies: Mayor- Leonel J. Castillo Larry Robinson Lawrence Sims Council At-Large, Position 1 Jeff Daiell Council At-Large, Position 2 Eleanor Tinsley 1. No ... no. 2. Not disposed to approve. 3. No. 1. (left blank) ... check mark. 2. Needs more information. 3. Needs more information. 1. No ... no. 2. No. 3. No. I. Yes ... yes. 2. motion. 3. Yes. Would need more infor- Joyce Williams Council At-Large, Position \ Olga Soliz Council At-Large, Position < Pat Ginther 1. No ... no. Council At-Large, Position 5 Jack Josey Terence I. No ... no. Council District A Stan Casey I. No ...no Council District B Ernest McGowen I. No ... no. Robert McPeters I. No ... no. Council District C Carl Haggard I. Only low level waste such at that produced by medical usage. 2. Plant currently beyond city's jurisdiction; preferable to limit population encroachment toward plant. 3. Current ratepayers should not pay-future ratepayers should. l.No ... no. 2. No. 3. No. I. No ... Only with an alert system. 2. Only with guaranteed safety. 3. No. 2. No. 3. No. 2. No. 3. No. 2. No. 3. No. 2. No. 2. No. 3. No. 3. No. Lance Lalor Council District D. Rodney Dargin Roy Grims Moses LeRoy Council District E. Ed Foote Council District F_ C. Gary Price Council District G. Jimmy Dunne Mike Kiszkiel Dianne May Kathryn Ross Council District H Russell Stanley Anne Wheeler Council District I BenT. Reyes I. No ... no. 2. No, unless converted to fusion. Fission too dangerous. 3. Yes, if fusion used. I. No ... no. 2. No. 3. No. I. No ... no. 1. No ... no. I. No ... no. 2. No. 2. No. 2. No. 3. No. 3. No. 3. No. 1. No ... no. 2. No. 3. No. I. No ... no. 2. No. 3. No. 1. No ... no. 1. No ... no. 1. No ... no. I. No ... no. 2. Yes. 2. No. 2. No. 2. No. 3. No. 3. No. 3. No. 3. No. I. No . . no. 2. No. 3. No. I. No . . no. 2. No. 3. No. 1. No ... no. 2. No. 3. No. For more information on the anti-nuclear group CAN-IT, call 522-3343. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 10 OCTOBER 1979