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Houston Breakthrough 1979-10
Page 8
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Houston Breakthrough 1979-10 - Page 8. October 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3064.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1979). Houston Breakthrough 1979-10 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3064

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1979-10 - Page 8, October 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3064.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1979-10
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_554ah.jpg
Transcript Caucus targets three council races & the politics of endorsements With all the effort made on behalf of single member districts to increase the chances of women and minorities getting elected, it could happen that the new nine plus five plan will give us 14 white, black and brown councilman and no women. In fact, a woman has never been elected to the Houston City Council in 142 years. "I don't think 9-5 helped women at all," says attorney Jo Ann Gerhardt, a campaign aide for Olga Soliz, running at-large, position 3. "It really didn't help minorities either. They have only three token (district) seats." The shortness of this campaign gives a double advantage to those with name identity: the incumbent council members and other office holders in this race. "If you take the seven councilmen running for re-election, plus the four state legislators (former and present) and the HISD trustee who are all giving city politics a first shot, these men have the edge in 12 out of 14 races," observes Benegene Kring, chair of the Harris County Women's Political Caucus (HCWPC). "We are not suggesting, however, that people vote for women only. We believe in supporting progressive candidates- male or female. Those who are strong on women's issues," she says. Harris County Women's Political Caucus Members of the caucus screened candidates for city office in late October and made these endorsements: District A—no endorsement District B-rio endorsement District C-Lance Lalor District D-Anthony Hall District E-Helen Hopkins District F-no endorsement District G-Kathryn Ross District H-Anne Wheeler District I-Ben Reyes At-large, position 1-no endorsement At-large, position 2-Eleanor Tinsley ELEANOR TINSLEY is running for At-Large, Position 2 At-large, position 3—Olga Soliz At-large, position 4-Pat Ginther At-large, position 5-no endorsement The Caucus targeted Kathy Whitmire's campaign for City Controller two years ago, and its members were the backbone of that successful election effort. This year they are targeting three races- Eleanor Tinsley (Position 2), Olga Soliz (Position 3) and Kathryn Ross (District G). Both Tinsley and Soliz are running against incumbents. Tinsley took on a 20-year incumbent, Frank Mann, and Soliz hopes to unseat Johnny Goyen, a 22-year incumbent. Ross ran against Mann two years ago and is now running in a newly created district. Eleanor Tinsley Tinsley has probably the best name identification of any of the 17 women running for council seats. She is a former president of the HISD school board. She's spending about $100,000 on her race and she is the only woman candidate, thus far, to have billboards, a strange sight up there among the Maceys, Manns, McKaskles, Mancusos and McConns—the five-M company. Because the Tinsley name is so well associated with community involvement (she serves on the boards of 40 organizations), because she got into the campaign early and raised some big money, and because of an exceptionally well-organized campaign, political observers, like Dr. Richard Murray of the University of Houston, give her the best chance of any candidate—male or female—to unseat an incumbent. "The city is beyond the time of Frank Mann. I think whatever services he has given the city have been given, and it's time for new leadership," Tinsley said of her 70-year-old opponent. "After 20 years Mann should be a leader. Instead, he either reacts to crises or puts things off for weeks and months." She gives examples of his votes against a swimming pool ordinance and maternity benefits for city employees. Tinsley is the strongest challenger to ever take on Frank Mann. She called a press conference in late October claiming Mann acted unethically when he "falsified" a recent $3500 campaign expenditure. The money went to pay his attorneys in the federal grand jury investigation looking into the allegation that Mann accepted a $ 1000 gift from the firefighters in his last campaign. Mann says the $3500 was justified to counteract "anything that these people are trying to bring up to cloud the issue in this campaign." Denying any wrongdoing on his part, Mann called Tinsley "a rat on a sinking ship grasping for anything to try to get elected." He attacked, as well, the fact that the Gay Political Caucus chose to endorse her. "I don't know what her standards or morals or ethics are. She's got the support of the queers. I don't know what she told them to get their support. They didn't interview me because they know my stand." Tinsley's been fighting a feisty campaign and an exhausting one. She has kept up an hour-by-hour campaign schedule with personal appearances all over the city. One Chronicle reporter trying to meet a deadline and irritated over the problem of reaching Tinsley for an interview asked one of the campaign volunteers, "What's with her? (implying-why does she think she's so important anyway?) I can pick up the phone and get Frank Mann straight away." "That's because he's not campaigning. He's always in his office," Nancy Winslow, the campaign worker told him. Olga Soliz Olga Soliz says Johnny Goyen isn't campaigning either. "I was so surprised to have him join us on a candidate's forum (on Channel 13). That was the first time I'd seen him in years. He hasn't appeared anywhere in the community. "He's either at work, at home-or just enjoying life," she guesses. "But we're taking time away from our jobs and our families to listen to what the community is saying. We're more in touch with how the public feels." But while people express their views to the candidates. Soliz, a long-time activist in the Harris County Women's Political Caucus and an advocate of building an 'old girls' network, says she picks up a discernible mood in the community. It goes something like this: " 'Why's a woman like you taking on N old man Goyen? or Why are you trying to take the old boys out?' They're really saying 'We prefer to keep things the way they are.' That's why we keep re-electing incumbents." Soliz says the hardest thing to overcome in her campaign experience is what she calls the "presence of the incumbent." At civic groups people reserve an importance for office holders they don't bestow on lowly candidates, she says. "On several occasions we've waited for our turn to speak only to have an incumbent's representative arrive, speak and leave. While we're still sitting and waiting, the incumbent makes an entrance and he gets to speak longer because people are so thrilled he bothered to show. So now you've heard two speeches on how he's going to improve the quality of life and you're still sitting and wondering if you'll ever get to say anything before you have to leave and take your children to their swim meet." Soliz has some strong views about poli- ticians-'They shouldn't be in for life" and supports a limit on the number of terms of public office, "Two," she says firmly. Soliz filed for office on the deadline date, October 6. In less than one month, she has raised over $15,000 and plans to buy radio and television time. The body of her campaign workers are members of the Women's Political Caucus and friends from the Harris County Hispanic Caucus, of which she is a founding member. Unlike Tinsley's harsh words about her opponent, Soliz steers away from any direct attacks on the man she is challenging and instead says matter-of-factly, "Johnny Goyen has served this community 22 years. Now's the time for a change. It's healthy to get new people, new ideas, fresh progressive approaches." Kathryn Ross A photo in her campaign brochure shows Kathryn Ross in front of City Hall. One caption holds a lot of promise. It reads: "She's not one of the boys." HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH OCTOBER 1979