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Houston Breakthrough, October 1979
Page 7
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Houston Breakthrough, October 1979 - Page 7. October 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 23, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3063.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1979). Houston Breakthrough, October 1979 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3063

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1979 - Page 7, October 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 23, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3084/show/3063.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 28 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
File Name femin_201109_554ag.jpg
Transcript LEONEL CASTILLO BETTE GRAHAM WHITE DEBBY LEONARD JEWELL LEMONS liberal activist Bob Hauge. "From a practical standpoint, the argument could be made that you need to spend time building up a campaign. But intellectually you could make the claim that he'll be a much better mayor with his national experience." "I know the Washington connection," explained Castillo. "I'm one of the few in this race who knows Jimmy and Teddy and I know people in Washington who'll be there regardless of who 11 be elected." "Castillo set the trend for the controller's office," said Hauge, "by being strong and speaking out. He was an activist in office. Who remembers the man who held it for 27 years before him?" The most serious drawback for Castillo is the lack of support from black leaders in the community. "Black leadership is the problem," said activist Macario Ramirez. "They're protecting their own self-interest. We hope they don't interfere." "My perception is he's not electable in Houston in 1979," said Lalor. "His name recognition is small . . . and there's a sufficient degree of racism left in Houston." It seems ironic that blacks are being charged with racism against Mexican- Americans at a time when the first moves are being made to form a local coalition of the two minorities. As head of the newly-formed National Black-Hispanic Coalition, U.S. Rep. Mickey Leland admits to feeling frustrated. "There are some serious problems," he conceded. "There is racism. No question about it. No question about it." A black leader, who declined to beJ named, felt that a major cause of Castillo's problems with blacks is John Castillo, Leonel Castillo's brother-in-law. John Castillo was head of Community Development in the Hofheinz administration, is now an executive assistant to McConn, and some blacks fear he will be inherited by the next mayor. "John Castillo destroyed more opportunities for blacks and browns to get together," claimed the black leader. "He created some unnecessary problems by making sure his folks got the goodies. He is now the symbol of the animosity that black people hold for the Chicano community." He went on to say that this animosity was not directed personally at Leonel Castillo. "He's a good man and would be a fine mayor." Whatever animosity exists, does not seem to come from the black community at large. "Our indication is that 70-75 percent of black residents support Castillo," said Ramirez. Dr. Richard Murray, political analyst, feels that although tension exists among the leaders, it does not filter down to the street level. "I don't think it will be that much of a problem," he said. "Politically, there is a perception that (blacks and browns) share more than they disagree on." Realistically, Castillo is by no means the front-runner in the race. "It would be a minor miracle if he pulled it off," said Carr. "But there's one thing about Leonel —he's kind of magic. He's never lost an election. He always comes through, even when he's not supposed to. He has a good sense of what the public wants and one reason for that is he trusts his own judgment and his judgment is good." Bette Graham White "What I'm best at is believing in the impossible," said Bette Graham White, addressing Women in Action recently. That statement is probably a realistic assessment of her chances of becoming mayor. White has a master's degree in theology, and has served as Community Development Commissioner for Montrose and the Fourth Ward. Making her second consecutive bid in that race, she is running on a platform of "bringing style to the mayor's office." MEDIA RATED ON CANDD3ATE COVERAGE Most candidates have had less than a month to reach the public, so the Houston media, more than ever, will play an important role in helping voters meet the cand- dates. The media will be doing this in two ways: (1) by taking cash to run ads and (2) by giving space or air time to permit voters an opportunity to see, hear, or read about the candidates and their views. City Controller Kathy Whitmire credited her victory two years ago with her appearance in a political forum on Channel 13. Whitmire appeared with four other controller candidates, some of whom had "downtown money" and invested it heav- illy in billboards and broadcast time. "We ran a grass roots campaign," said Whitmire, "and couldn't afford to put our money into media advertising. More people told me-during the campaign and after—that they voted for me because of that one public affairs program on Channel 13." Except for the incumbents and a handful of independently wealthy political aspirants, most women and men are running tight money campaigns. These candidates are dependent on the free access given them on public affairs programming, as well as on coverage by the Houston dairies. The Post and the Chronicle printed daily articles in a district-by-district and at-large breakdown, giving good background on the candidates and their major positions. Joe Nolan at the Chronicle has been the primary source of news analysis stories. There's been a lot of note-taking at press conferences, political rallies and endorsement meetings but no one's written The Big Story. Yet. For more politics in print, the League of Women Voters is coming out with their perennially excellent Voter's Guide, a 20-page tabloid on candidates' replies to the League questionnaire. (See Network on how to get one). Here's what Houston stations are offering in terms of public affairs time—along with our rating on their commitment to public service. Three stars is best (meaning an attempt to interview all candidates), two stars is good (all mayoral and some council candidates), one star is mediocre, and a zero or meatball is self-explanatory. KTRK-TV: For the third straight year, Channel 13 is granting time to every candidate running for office in a Meet the Candidate series. The station is interviewing all candidates for mayor in three separate half-hour programs, and council candidates in 15 half-hour time slots. News Director Walter Hawver says hardly anyone turns down this opportunity. Even Mayor McConn, in un-incumbent fashion, will appear. (Sundays, October 21, 28, and November 4 and 10 a.m., noon, 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., and 2 p.m.) KUHT-TV: Channel 8 and the League of Women Voters will co-host an election eve special, 9 and 5 at 8. All candidates will have two minutes to present themselves to viewers, and will answer one question from a member of the League of Women Voters. If time permits, follow-up questions will be asked by Joe Nolan, political writer for the Chronicle and Susan Wright, political commentator at KUHT. (Mon day, November 5, 8 p.m. - 11 p.m.) KPFT—FM: Ed Falk, host of Issues with Ed Falk, began interviewing candidates as early as September. Although all candidates were welcome to appear, Falk's main criterion was to give air time to candidates with limited campaign funds. A strong conservative, Falk interviewed candidates of all political persuasions, including the socialist candidate for mayor, and many liberals. On the show before the general election, Falk will do a wrap-up with Steve McVicker, KPFT news director, and the editors of Breakthrough. (Mondays, 6:30 p.m.); On Access with Jack Woods, Woods gave air time to many of the progressive candidates in the city race weeks before the election (Wednesdays, 7 p.m.); and Nancy Lane Fleming and Rita Saylors devoted three programs of Breakthrough on the Air to women in politics. (Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m.) oo KHOU—TV: Mayoral candidates and other "major" candidates will appear on Channel 11 's morning (7:30 a.m.) and noon shows in the weeks before the election. KRIV—TV: Mayoral candidates (Vi hour each day starting October 23, time to be announced, check dailies) and candidates in District I, the predominantly Mexican- American district (time to be announced) will appear on Channel 26 programs. KYOK—AM: All mayoral candidates and candidates from District D, a predominantly black district (time to be announced). Kin ITV: One hour program for all mayoral candidates on Channel 39. (Sunday, November 4, 6 - 7 p.m.) KPRC-TV: Coverage on Big 2 News Conference for Mayoral candidates. (Sunday, November 4 at a special time, from 4 - 5 p.m.) KCOH—AM: Two candidates each Sunday on Food for Thought. (Sundays 5 - 5:30 p.m.) KULF—AM: Mayoral candidates only on Houston '79. (Sundays, October 28 and November 4 at 7:30 a.m. and repeated at 11 p.m.) KPRC—AM: Only mayoral candidates. (Starting Monday, October 22, daily from 2 - 3 p.m.) KAUM—FM: One hour with candidates. (Monday, November 5,1-2 p.m.) KUHF—FM: Two programs with District G candidates only (Monday, October 30 at 6:30 p.m.; repeated next day at noon.) No plans: KENR-AM, KXYZ-AM, KIKK, KLVL, KNUZ/KQUE, KODA. No response: KTRH, KILT. Our thanks to Betty Prather for calling all the stations and reporting this information for Breakthrough. — J. b. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH OCTOBER 1979