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Houston Breakthrough, September 1977
Page 17
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Houston Breakthrough, September 1977 - Page 17. September 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 30, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3027.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1977). Houston Breakthrough, September 1977 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3027

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, September 1977 - Page 17, September 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 30, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3027.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, September 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1977
Description Vol. 2 No. 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
File Name femin_201109_531p.jpg
Transcript By Kathleen Clayton Being a nurse today is frequently a frustrating experience. The American health care system is in a crisis. It fails to deliver needed services to all people. Since nurses are the largest group of health care professionals, they are in a position to effect significant change. But the changes are not coming with any speed. The graduating nurse soon learns she has responsibility for giving nursing care but little authority to determine how it shall be rendered. The local chapter of the Texas Nurses Association will hold a conference here Sept. 17 they hope will help change that. It is called Power Shortage: Economic, Political, Professional and Female. The educational system provides nurses principles and teaches practices of quality health care. But the real world rarely allows full use of that knowledge. So the question is how can nurses gain more control over nursing practice and subsequently over the entire health care system. The first step is to identify the barriers to nurses taking control. Since nursing is overwhelmingly a women's profession, the matter is also a women's issue. "The characteristics, the concerns, the problems, the frus trations, the exploitations experienced by women everywhere can easily be seen in the everyday workworld of the professional nurse," Carol Spengler and Mariene Grissum write in Womanpower and Health Care. "Just as women everywhere must become aware of the barriers in society that prevent them from developing their full potential, so must nurses," they write. A consensus of the 400 Houston members of the Texas Nurses Association is that the three biggest barriers are fear, ignorance and apathy. So their meeting, to be held at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel, will be a sort of professional assertiveness training session. Participants will learn the factors that have created the power shortage and possible solutions to the problem. The keynote speaker will be Eddie Bernice Johnson, a registered nurse and former state representative who has just become regional director of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. (See page 8.) A "power panel" will consist of Ann Hughes, a business administration professor and director of the University of Texas at Arlington's Labor Studies Institute; U.S. Rep. Bob Gammage, D-Hous- ton; Carol Spengler, author and i POWER SHORTAGE: j economic- political- ' professional and female. WORKSHOP SAT. SEPT. \7 Pat Bohan director of nursing at the Mid- Missouri Mental Health Center in Columbia, and Evelyn Yoakum, an individual, marriage and group therapist. Each will also head separate forums on one of the four areas of power awareness. The workshop is set for Saturday, Sept. 17, from 8:45 a.m. until 3 p.m. Fees for attendance range from $30 down, with discounts for women's group members and students. Persons wanting more information may call 523-3619. Womanpower& Healthcare By Nancy Lane Fleming Womanpower and Health Care (Little, Brown and Company, $6.95) is a book about women learning to use power. The authors, Carol Spengler and Marlene Grissum, nurses with graduate degrees, are clearly in touch with their power both as women and as health care professionals. They have produced a book which is a guide not only for nurses, but for women in general, for getting control of their work and their lives. The first section of the book examines the socialization of women into passive and dependent roles and how the process is continued and emphasized in nursing education. The authors seek to make women aware of the attitudes and behavior which prevent them from taking their work seriously and defining their own roles. Following chapters strongly encourage women to take responsibility for themselves and place emphasis on what can be done to change their position in a male- dominated society. The result is invigorating. Rather than overwhelming the reader with a litany of injustices and de scriptions of male supremacy, Spengler and Grissum give concrete, explicit suggestions for transcending traditional roles and getting rid of barriers to success. They also candidly prepare the reader for the risks involved. Womanpower and Health Care is a handbook for change. It deals rationally and constructively with emotional issues in which the authors are deeply involved. It is carefully prepared and documented and introduces the reader to works for further study. Although it is directed primarily at practicing nurses, this book is relevant to other women. It speaks to anyone interested in quality health care. But beyond that, Spengler and Grissum's world of nursing and its problems become a microcosm of the entire male-dominated society. One of the most dramatic ways in which the book succeeds is as a demonstration of what the authors propose for others. Here two women have worked together, researching and sharing their experiences. The resulting work is a good example of what serious commitment can bring. In that way Spengler and Grissum have become the sort of role models they say nurses need. PAGE 12 SEPTEMBER 1977 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH "Whenever we're out of the office, the Breakthrough phones are answered courteously and pour messages are taken efficiently 24 hours a day by OF HOUSTON a woman-owned business" radio paging D live answering service Central Office 4215 Graustark 524-3985 Southwest Offico 3221 Fondron 781-3413 Northeast Office 4215 Graustark 691-2088 Northwest Office 12345 Kingsride 467-2111 Roberta K. tttfinghast, Prosidont Houston • Galvoston • San Antonio • Corpus Christi m.