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Houston Breakthrough 1977-09
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Houston Breakthrough 1977-09 - Page 10. September 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3021.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1977). Houston Breakthrough 1977-09 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3021

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1977-09 - Page 10, September 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3021.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough 1977-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1977
Description Vol. 2 No. 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_531j.jpg
Transcript ANN LASATER "... / wasgratefulforthe comment that my feet seemed very relaxed " Getting three body work sessions in one week may not have changed my life, but it certainly changed my attitude toward life, however temporarily. Despite trouble relaxing on the job and being nervous about what was expected of me, sessions with the four body workers interviewed made me a believer. First-time clients sometimes have difficulty concentrating on what is happening, Hedden said, and I was no exception. She constantly had to remind me to breathe deeply as a 'centering technique.' 'People who are out of touch with their bodies restrict their breathing,' she said, discounting my weak suggestion that people who jog as much as I do couldn't be-that out of touch. 'Often that type of physical exercise is a cover-up for body awareness,' she said. The first sessions, Hedden said, are spent going over the body slowly, building trust. After that the body worker can concentrate on what seem to be high-tension areas, which in me were inner thighs (sitting at a desk all day, Hedden said), neck and shoulders. Lasater detected much of the same after examining my profile and noted that I thrust my head forward. We talked briefly about whether that was an indication of anxiety and rushing to meet the future. Where Hedden had used fairly light pressure, Lasater pressed much harder and on muscles I never knew existed. When I seemed in pain, she told me to breathe deeply and then she pressed harder. Kendrick had told me, 'There are memories stored in the muscles,' but I think it would take a number of sessions with Lasater or another Lomi associate to get to them. Still, the strong pressure left me tingling and relaxed. Kendrick and Dollison took opposite positions, Kendrick working on my neck and shoulders while Dollison massaged my feet. Self-conscious about my body and prone position in this my first session with body workers, I was grateful for Dollison's comment that my feet seemed very relaxed. Perhaps because it was my first session, I anticipated their fingers a lot, which kept me from unwinding. Also, I kept my clothes on, which was undoubtedly more inhibiting. Kendrick and Lasater say they prefer their clients to be nude, while Hedden asks them to wear underclothes. Lasater rubbed my stomach with oil, which is often used on clients as they lie on the raised sheet-covered pads or mattresses. All of the women work in rooms set aside in their homes except Hedden "and she will soon be doing the same. — E.H. Bed/awareness By Esther Horton "This story may change your life," Ann Lasater told me when I called for an interview. Perhaps she was remembering how the subject—body awareness—has changed her own. Seven years ago, Lasater, an ambitious young bank officer here, met a yoga enthusiast and took a class. Back at work, she began to realize her profession "was just not feeding me." She quit and began what became a consuming re-education of both her body and mind, a pursuit which took her to India, California and now back home. When she began, Lasater had no idea her search would become the means toward a new career. Nor did Fleur Hedden, Beth Kendrick and Alethea Dollison who came by different doors but are now also "body workers," a subject they discussed with Breakthrough recently. Body workers, in essence, use deep muscle-relaxing techniques to re-align the posture of muscles, said Kendrick, who dates her interest in the subject from reading George Downing's "Massage Book" in 1972. The purpose is to help the client recover flexibility in her or his muscles, relieve tension and thus clear the mind. Of course it's more complicated than that. Body work varies from simple massage which primarily deals with taking away tension to far more complex techniques such as Lomi, an attempt through pressure at certain points (depending on where the client is most tense) to explore the emotion which caused the tension in the first place. "In Lomi (Hawaiian for massage) you go back into your life and there's a lot of stress," Lasater said. Thus, clients are apt to cry, laugh, scream, curse and otherwise react emotionally as they become conscious of their feelings during a one-hour session. To cope with such reactions, the Lomi worker uses techniques developed in Gestalt psychology, breathing, yoga and meditation. The idea, Lasater said, is "to train a person to experience how their emotions are affecting their body." In between simple massage and Lomi are a variety of body awareness techniques, and body workers usually offer a range of skills, depending on their training and interests. Fleur Hedden, for example, does massage at her Bayland St. office but her specialty is polarity balancing, which involves applying pressure at positive and negative poles in the body, sending energy through blockages and bringing the body into "balance." The result varies greatly from client to client, Hedden said, "but the immediate result is a deep sense of relaxation and release of tension." Because she absorbs a lot of tension herself from her work Hedden regularly trades services with a Lomi associate and a chiropractor, giving free balancing sessions, which usually cost $25, in exchange for sessions with them. Hedden believes strongly in body awareness because "I know what getting in touch with your body will do for you on multiple levels." She says it has meant a total change in personality and a weight loss in the last year of 45 pounds. Because of her own experience begun as a college student in Colorado with "alternatives" such as vegetarianism, Hedden supplements her body work "with other points of view designed to make the body work better" including nutrition, herbs, diet and fasting information. Kendrick does the same but said for years she had difficulty meshing her interest in such matters with her activism in the women's movement. The conflict arose after moving here in 1969. "On the one hand, I was very dedicated to feminist politics and, on the other, I was getting very much in touch with my own needs for personal freedom and health." The two didn't seem to fit together here so in 1975 she moved to Eugene, Ore., where she knew there was a strong women's community interested in both. She did find "the political and spiritual much more integrated" there, she said, although "I realize now I could find them here if I had them in myself." One of the aims of the women's movement, she believes, should be to bring the two planes together. "If you are only out there fighting political battles and ignoring your body, the feelings are not going to be as strong," she contends. Kendrick is helping to develop a funding proposal for a center for battered women in Houston (see Breakthrough, June 1977), which has provided some income. Recently, she said she has begun to be able to support herself, barely, with one-to-one body work ($10-$25 per session) and teaching $25 "body awareness" classes. Other than as a means of support, body work is a job which gives both her and her clients happiness, Kendrick said. Continued on p. 16 £% p& *#S m S£BF^# j|§ ■ 1 M *J$' mI -if m w ■'■•-^ i»fl IB h^S £ x^ir • #$ ' •.':'fi| BETH KENDRICK ALETHEA DOLLISON Modern Dance •Ballet Creative Dance for Children The Dance Studio with Beverly Cook 2328 Bissonnet Houston 77005 526-2585 862-2172 Free pREqNANCy TESTJNq & JNfORMATiON 868-4485 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH SEPTEMBER 1977 PAGE 9