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Houston Breakthrough 1977-09
Page 5
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Houston Breakthrough 1977-09 - Page 5. September 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3016.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1977). Houston Breakthrough 1977-09 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3016

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough 1977-09 - Page 5, September 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/3036/show/3016.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough 1977-09
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date September 1977
Description Vol. 2 No. 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 25 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_531e.jpg
Transcript Mary Ross Rhyne, owner of The Bookstore, on Risks of Starting Your Own Business: PART ONE: IF YOU FAIL A. Your optimism and confidence will be damaged. B. You'll have lost some or all of the money you saved, borrowed, or raised from investors. C. Your credit may be affected. D. You may lose friendships, if you went into business with friends. E. You may be embarrassed to face your mentors, creditors, investors, advisers, or friends. F. Your husband/lover/in-laws may say: l.."You didn't know when you were well off." 2. "It's not as if you have to work." 3. "Teaching is such a nice job for a woman." 4. "Women just aren't cut out for business." G. You'll have to look for another job. H. You may regret the time spent on a project that failed. PART TWO: IF YOU SUCCEED A. You'll have to put most of your time and energy into the business. B. You may have to work hardest on weekends and at holiday times when your family or friends are playing. C. Your parents/in-laws may say: 1. "Her poor husband." 2. "Those poor children." D. Your old friends may feel threatened and defensive, or jealous. E. If you make a lot of money 1. Your husband/lover may resent it. 2. You'll have to deal with more financial decisions. F. If you don't make a lot of money 1. Your husband/lover may resent it. 2. You'll have to worry about staying in the black. 3. You'll feel overworked and underpaid. G. You'll find out that people will say: 1. "Her poor husband (lover)." 2. "Those poor children." 3. "All she needs is a good *!@k." 4. "She did it by sleeping with the customers/suppliers/ media people." 5. "She's probably a lesbian." H. Youll have to figure out what to say when you're asked to make a talk on "Operating a successful business"! NEXT YEAR: REWARDS OF STARTING YOUR OWN BUSINESS. MARY ROSS RHYNE (right foreground) THERISKTAKERS*. WOMEN WHO START THEIR OW/NDUSBNESS see cover photo Kathryn VanDement Heilhecker, Proprietor, Houston Automatic Transmission Service: Five years ago, if someone had looked in a crystal ball and said I would be operating an automotive repair shop, getting dirty and greasy like any other auto mechanic, I would have thought them crazy! At that time, I was an oil company secretary planning to be married in the next few months and to inherit a ready-made family of four. That was, or so I thought, the most significant change of my life. Then the real decision time came. My father died and I had to decide whether to continue his business or sell it. How could I, a woman without previous training or knowledge, operate an automotive repair business? How would my "new family" and I adjust to the responsibilities that a business of this type would demand? Would the general public and the employees accept a woman as manager of an auto repair business? Marilyn Jones The first few days answered my questions. The employees, who had worked for my dad many years, were extremely helpful. For days our customers kept the phones ringing with encouragement. My family and my future family were very supportive. Bankers that I contacted during the early months were not so encouraging; in fact, they were unwilling to make the loans necessary to keep the business operating. These financial "experts" were quite sure that a woman was not capable of managing a successful automotive repair business. Over four years of profitable operation have proven them wrong. It was a long, hard road. I've learned a lot about auto repairs, especially the automatic transmission, and I continue to take auto courses. Not only do our women customers feel more relaxed dealing with another woman, but even most of our male customers can accept a female garage owner and "grease monkey." Barbara T. Grizzle, owner of The Little Thicket: Owning a business is like be coming a new parent — you listen to all kinds of advice and usually end up throwing it out Front Page Photo of Kathryn VanDement Heilhecker by Janis Fowles Marion Coleman, owner of House of Coleman, a graphic arts and printing business: When I decided I wanted to bpen, there was no printing shop fin Houston that offered design work, paste-up, illustration, copy- writing, photography and quality printing under one roof. I was too elated with my idea to feel anxiety even when it came to securing capital... I never had any doubts that I could do the work. The only anxiety I ever experienced came as a great surprise to me. It came when I went to call on ad agencies and try to get their business. Without exception each of the purchasing agents I saw questioned whether a woman PAGE 4 SEPTEMBER 1977 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH could not only run a printing business but actually be a printer. Their doubt increased when I showed them samples from my portfolio, as they did not believe that the quality printing they saw could be done on an A.B. Dick machine, which is traditionally used as a duplicating machine. But it was and it still is today... Had it not been for George Bush I might not have made it through those first six months. He was beginning his campaign for the Senate and gave me enough business to keep my doors open. Eventually a little business trickled in from the agencies and the owner of a typesetting firm took an interest in what I was doing and spread the word. If I had to give a reason for the success of my business I could do it in one word: friends. Friends were the ones who helped me paint and hammer, brought me supper from their tables when I couldn't stop working, cheered with me everytime a new job came in. They brought in jobs and ran errands and sipped coffee and were there for all the bad times and all the good ones, too... So slowly I have watched my own dream come true. I have to admit that I still feel slightly amused everytime one of those first doubting purchasing agents calls to get my advice or to see if I will handle an important printing job for his agency. And, ironically, I can see in them the anxiety I felt seven years ago when I was sitting on the other side of the desk. the window. I feel your business is yours and it needs to learn like a child growing. After I made my decision to become independent, I got a personal loan from the Houston Area Feminist Federal Credit Union and built a greenhouse, selling plants at the flea market on weekends to build inventory. Adapting myself to the new situation has been most trying. I've got it now, what do I do with it? This is where I'm finding the real work begins. It's tricky, for in a greenhouse you need knowledge, love, gentleness, and constant caring. Then you go into your office and try to figure out a way to make a living at what you love. I have learned a lot and life is for learning.