Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Breakthrough 1976-01
Page 14
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 14. January 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1976). Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/300

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 14, January 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-01
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_513n.jpg
Transcript Crimes remain unsolved OKLAHOMA CITY (AP)— Oklahoma State Police troopers raided an exclusive private club 10 miles outside Oklahoma City late last night and arrested the- club manager and 17 members who, according to a state police spokesman, were watching a pornographic movie that shocked the veteran law enforcement officers. In the movie, a young woman was actually murdered right there on the screen," the state police spokesman said, "and the killer, a man in a black hood, drank her blood." The 17 arrested club members told the state police they paid $300 each to watch the underground skin flick. They were released without charges. The club manager is being held for questioning. (Oct. 31, 1975) LOS ANGELES (AP)—FBI officials here are searching for the makers and distributors of two pornographic movies in which women were murdered. Local police officials have identified the women as "two aspiring actresses from Alabama" who responded to an actress-wanted ad in a trade newspaper. The FBI says the films were made and distributed in late September and early October and viewers paid as much as $500 each to see them. A Los Angeles psychologist who has studied rapist-murderers and who has seen the two pornographic films reports that to some men, inflicting or seeing death is "the ultimate orgasm." (Nov. 1, 1975) HOUSTON—A faded roadmap peppered with black pins traces the trail of violence against nine Houston women in less than eight weeks. The map hangs on the wall in the Houston Police Department's homicide division. The pins mark the apartments, houses, vacant lots, and ditches where these women were found murdered. Their killers still roam freely on the streets of Houston. Between 1970-1975, 573 women have been murdered and 104 of these deaths remain unsolved. The first murder victim in 1970 was Sheila Elaine Mouton, a young pregnant working woman whose body was found in an abandoned house on Gray Street. "That was sort of the beginning, an indication of things to come," remembers Lannie Stephenson, a now-retired detective who was the only woman in the homicide division in 1970 and who worked on the Mouton case. The "beginning" Stephenson refers to is the five year string of unsolved murders. The 104 murder cases are stuffed in folders in the office of Breckenridge Porter, the division's lieutenant of detectives. Most of them have not received any followup work since the original offense reports were filed. Fifty-one were Black women. Thirty-seven were white. Thirteen were Chicana. Three were foreigners. More than 50 percent of these murders occurred in the central city—Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Wards. But they have also occurred in River Oaks, Champions, Spring Branch, the waterfront, South Park, and Tanglewood. In more than 90 percent of the cases, women were raped before or after being killed. Homicide Capt. L. D. Morrison cites what he calls an "age old problem" as the reason these cases have remained unsolved. "We just don't have enough people," he says. "This division has less than 50 people who are spread out over three shifts. There're at least two murders a day in this city and in addition to all these cases, we're like the garbage can. We handle rapes, aggravated assaults, assaults to murder, extortion, bomb threats, obscene calls, serious threats to take life . . . and if someone injures a dog to hunt that dog's owner, that's our baby too. Hell, what do you expect from 50 people?" Morrison views his detectives as hardworking people; however, Stephenson who worked at the central station for 20 years, contradicts that. "They're great when it comes to working on routine beer joint or family squabble killings, Stephenson says of her former colleagues. "The killer is usually there to surrender or someone knows who did it and will lead the cops to that person. But when it comes to cases involving few clues and few details, investigation is required. That's a hated word around the station," she says. "Nobody wants to do any real investigation. It's too hard." The divisions inability to solve the killings of 104 women could very well lie in the police department's attitude toward almost all assault cases involving women. A directive issued three years ago is pasted on the wall in the homicide division. "TO ALL CAPTAINS-IN- CHARGE ON WEEKENDS: Effective immediately, unless a women has been admitted to a hospital, she will not be able to file assault charges against her husband or boyfriend until Monday morning when we can counsel with an assistant district attorney or a municipal court judge. Tell them to come back Monday." The order is signed by then-Police Chief Herman Short. When a woman does manage to file an assault charge, the police do not arrest the accused man. Rather, they send him a letter informing him charges have been filed.The letter asks the man to go to the stationhouse and post bond "when you find it convenient." Currently, there are over 1,000 outstanding arrest warrants against men who have beaten their wives. The police claim they do not have the "manpower" to arrest these assailants. Recipe for an oil change Check your oil. Does it look like burned gravy? Going to fund raisers, meetings, pickets, and whatever, have you put 6000 miles on your car? If both answers are yes, well it's time for a change (oil change). I have just the recipe: jack and two jacks stands or large bricks (optional) 5 quarts of oil (4 for 4-cylinder cars) 1 oil filter 1 crescent wrench 1 oil filter wrench 1 large pan 1 oil can spout or can opener Take all ingredients out to your car and proceed to change oil. First jack your car up in the front. Just so the car won't fall on your head, always secure it under the frame (square- shaped bar running length of car on both sides) with jack stands. Next locate the oil pan. Be careful not to drain your transmission fluid. It's easy to mix the two pans up. The oil pan is forward of the transmission pan. Adjust your crescent wrench to a perfect fit on your oil pan plug. Turn counter-clockwise. Grunts, groans and screams are permitted on difficult (dugs. If it doesn't work, try a little rust lubricant (WD-40, Liquid Wrench, etc.) or a longer wrench. Have the pan handy to catch the oil. Be careful, it may be hot. Replace and tighten plug. Don't forget the plug's washer if it has one. While you are down there, see if you can locate the oil filter. If not, you may have to look under the hood. Place the oil filter wrench around the filter and again turn counter-clockwise. Here too, grunts, groans and screams are allowed Since filters have a rubber gasket at the top, the hot engine may melt its seal. In this case a dirty word (just one) is permitted to loosen it. Catch the oil. Oil the new rubber gasket and install new filter (clockwise). Tighten % turn only. Pour oil into engine. Start her up! (orhim, whatever). Check underneath the car for leaks. No leaks? RIDE ON, SISTERS! These instructions may differ slightly on old or foreign cars. If your filter fits inside a metal cylinder, the one thing to remember is to remove the old gasket, oil the new gasket and set it in place on the car before re-installing the cylinder. JAN TARVER State law—written by a legislature that is overwhelmingly male—tends to be just as discriminating against women victims of assault. According to the statutes, unless a woman is beaten so severely that she requires medical attention, she cannot file a county criminal charge—one which could land the man behind bars. If a woman has been mildly beaten, she can merely file a municipal court charge. If the man is convicted, he can be fined only up to $100. "My argument has been that the police go to great lengths to avoid taking action against husbands or boyfriends guilty of criminal assault, thereby encouraging vicious crimes." former detective Lannie Stephenson says. "My ex-colleagues assert that many people in Houston do not ordinarily think of violence between husband and wife as criminal behavior. In fact," she says, "they tend to think that an occasional beating is part of a relationship which gives some satisfaction to both parties." Stephenson is convinced that it is this overall attitude that male detectives hold toward women in domestic muggings that keeps them from vigorously investigating the 104 unsolved murders still logged on homicide books. THOMAS WRIGHT , > ' . "Man's discovery that his genitals could serve as a weapon to generate fear must rank as one of the most important discoveries of prehistoric times, along with the use of fire and the first crude stone ax." — Susan Brownmiller in Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape To all newspersons We reprint a memorandum which was issued by Ray Miller, News Director, KPRC-TV, 10 days prior to the station's signing an agreement with the Houston Area Chapter of NOW during the 1974 license renewal period. The agreement called for an increase in coverage of women's news and other programming and employment gains. The memorandum spells out non-sexist language standards which we hope Houston news directors will implement in their departments. Breakthrough would like feedback from the station's news departments regarding this New Year's request. "June 13, 1974 "TO: All News Reporters and News Writers "Let us follow a regular policy of keeping sexist stereotypes out of our copy and off the air. "As a general rule, you can do this by avoiding words that suggest a person in a certain role is likely to be of a certain sex — police officers instead of policemen, chairpersons instead of chairmen, members of Congress instead of Congressmen, and so on. (But it is OK to call Bill Archer Congressman Archer, since you are dealing with a specific member and you know his sex.) "Unless you know of some strong feelings to the contrary on the part of the people you are writing about use the title 'Ms.' instead of Mrs. or Miss, but this is not to say that women should be always referred to as 'Ms.' It is better to refer to them by their names. Hazel Bracken, for instance, is Hazel Bracken — or Bracken — or Board member Hazel Bracken — and does not need to be referred to as either 'Mrs.' or 'Ms.' for purposes of reporting the news. "And the women's movements should be referred to by their proper names, or referred to as women's movements, and not women's lib movements." "Thank you, " [signed] Ray Miller" 14