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Breakthrough 1976-01
Page 11
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Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 11. January 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 27, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/297.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1976). Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/297

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 11, January 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 27, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/297.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-01
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_513k.jpg
Transcript Reviews A battle of wills Michael McClure's The Beard, produced and directed by Gary Cha- son at Houston's Museum of Modern Art, 610 West Alabama, is like an object encased in a plastic bag. It moves, thrusts, rolls over as it develops a rhythm within its confined space. The play opened here December 11. First presented about 10 years ago in San Francisco, The Beard gives us Jean Harlow (Claine Hartt) and Billy the Kid (Barry Gremillion) as prototypes of sex object and macho male thrown together time without end in hell or heaven or some eternity. They project themselves and relate to each other through the stereotypes they embody: she the writhing silky-silk- swathed body with contrapuntal floating boa, he in skin-tight black with boots. While ostensibly about sex, the play is very interesting from a feminist point of view as a struggle of wills: whose will is stronger, whose will dominates. Each claims to be in control and to be willing what is happening—indeed, willing the very existence of the other. She frequently repeats the statement that^he has many selves and he must find the real one. For all of his momentary show of brutality (which results in a torn stocking and bitten toe) it is she who is in control, she who sets the pace and decides how quickly or slowly they proceed as each seeks dominance. He has moments of independence, but they seem like petulant reactions to her defiance. When they finally reach the point which was the purpose of each from the start—sex—it is sex which is satisfying to her (cunnilingus). It is a beautifully coordinated production, visually and audially. The erotic aspects of The Beard do not seem shocking today. Apparently the play was "shocking" when it opened in the 60' s. But in the interim, we have had "O Calcutta," "Deep Throat" and legions of R-rated movies to accustom us to the idea that yes, we all have a body, and the body is a legitimate subject for art without fretting about that indefinable concept, obscenity. At MOMA's Gallery-Theater the theatrical experience is not limited to the playing area; it extends out onto the sidewalk, where large plastic woman's legs project from the front wall of the building. This recalls Niki de St. Phalle's "Moma" in Brussels several years ago; an immense plaster body of woman was thrust between her legs. Sounds like the ultimate portrayal of woman as an object, but at any rate, at 610 West Alabama the male body is also celebrated by being objectified through art. Inside the theater, one is surrounded by erotic sculpture, painting, drawing and photography. Bravo Sandra Stevens, Yannis Manolakos, Gary Chason et al. of MOM A! A gallery-theater of erotic art in Houston is to be welcomed. (Note: The play is held over through Sunday, February 1. Performances take place at 8 p.m. Thursdays - Sunday. Tickets are $3.50 and reservations may be made by calling 528-3627.) GERTRUDE BARNSTONE Play humor panned THE FRONT PAGE, Alley Theater through January 11 SUE WITTIE 7he Front Page is a comedy that gets its laughs at the expense of "niggers," "tarts" and seduced stenographers. One is reminded of the feature line of a recent Ms. article: "Why we aren't laughing anymore . . ." This Alley Theater/ Nina Vance production, partially funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in Washington, D.C., a federal agency, and sanctioned by the American Revolution Bicentennial Commission, painfully reminds us of the way it was 50 years ago and how far we have to go. An incredible John Kenny set establishes the tawdry image ol a I920*s press room in Chicago. The newsmen treat women only as objects of derisive scorn or equally offensive sexual imagery as they recount recent seductions. The women who are seduced are mentioned by group nomenclature such as waitresses, stenographers and other "public" women. Negative sterotypes of women, Blacks and low-status workers are woven through the plot by the end of the first act, but the worst was yet to come. In Acts Two and Three, 4 stereotypical female characters pass through the press room. Neither the good-hearted cleaning woman, the misunder stood prostitute, the bitch motherin-law nor the clinging, weeping bride-to-be come to any productive end. The "tart" throws herself out a window to save the life of the one man who has treated her well. Her destruction is the only "productive" end for a street woman. The bride and her mother, portrayed as castrating manipulators, cling to men. The methods merely differ as the mother tears into the leading man with caustic tongue while the "little woman" weeps her way to victory. The view of women is everything contingent upon their ability to please the men of the press room. The deepest insult does not lie in the writing of Hecht and MacArthur but in having U.S. tax dollars and a Bicentennial stamp of approval on something so degenerating to Blacks and women. Humor is a form of aggression in society and expresses those emotions not capable of being carried out overtly. Covertly they appear on stage. Perhaps theatergoers realize its "historical" nature but it remains to be seen if the status of Blacks and women has changed enough in fifty years to circumvent white male supremacy. We cannot stand by without protesting negative treatment in the arts no matter what its historic context. By reputation The Beard, an erotic play which opened at the Houston Museum of Modern Art and runs ultimate portrayal of woman as object," observes feminist critic Gertrude Barnstone, but in the play "the art." Barnstone sees the play as a triumph over wills. And, Jean Harlow's will-be-done by the play's through February 1,''sounds like the male body is also celebrated through end. Assert yourself - act equal Do you begin almost every sentence with: "I'm sorry ..." "It's only my opinion ..." "I know this sounds stupid, but. . ." "I kinda think . . ." or "I sorta feel. . ."? Well then, read The New Assertive Woman. There are many books telling women how-to-put-it-all-together. The New Assertive Woman is an all-together "how-to" book written to help women, conditioned in dependent behavior, to become independent. One of its basic premises is that women must be aware of their personal rights (see chart, " Every - woman's Bill of Rights") and assert themselves in repossessing their basic human rights. The authors of The New Assertive Woman assert that the ultimate right is to change behavior. Conditioned behavior is learned and can be unlearned. When women choose to ignore or do not claim their rights, they resort to playing games such as ' 'the sufferer" or "after all I've done for you." Example: Non-Assertive If you appreciated all I' ve done for you, you would want to help me more. Assertive I need the cleaning picked up. Will you please stop by and get it before four o'clock? Another game is, "It doesn't matter to me; whatever you want.'' Example: Non-Assertive It doesn't make any difference. Any place you want to go—whatever you want to eat or do. Assertive I want to go see a movie. I would like to eat fish. I'm tired and want to rest and do nothing. Unlike the manipulating Fascinating Woman and the submissive Total Woman, The New Assertive Woman attempts to undo years of "feminization." It tries to help a woman find her own independent identity and to be responsible to herself for her feelings, ideas, and behavior. The authors include a test of female assertiveness: 1. Did you say what you wanted to say? 2. Were you direct and unapologe- tic? 3. Did you stand up for your own rights without infringing on the rights of the other person? 4. Were you sitting or standing in an assertive posture? 5. Did your voice sound strong and calm? Were your gestures relaxed? 6. Did you feel good about yourself after you finished speaking? Once a woman learns to be assertive, she has acquired skills that will give her more choices, more independence, more self-esteem and more control of her own life. Women are born equal. The New Assertive Woman shows women how to act equal. Every woman's Bill of Rights* 1. The right to be treated with respect 2. The right to have and express your own feelings and opinions 3. The right to be listened to and taken seriously 4. The right to set your own priorities 5. The right to say no without feeling guilty 6. The right to ask for what you want 7. The right to get what you pay for 8. The right to ask for information from professionals 9. The right to make mistakes 10. The right to choose not to assert yourself * Excerpts from The New Assertive Woman by Lynn Bloom, Karen Coburn, and Joan Pearlman. ©opyright 1975 by Lynn Bloom, Karen Coburn, and Joan Pearlman. Used with the permission of the De- lacorte Press.