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Breakthrough 1976-01
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Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 4. January 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/290.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1976). Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/290

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 4, January 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/290.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1976-01
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_513d.jpg
Transcript AP makes stew of newsmakers Ap writer Mary Campbell's soup-to-nuts summary called "Women of '75" makes for some very strange stew ingredients — all in the name of liberation. Present and former first ladies are lumped together with attempted assassins, saints, movie stars, you name it, as long as they just happened to make news by "their worries, words, guns, and deeds." AP's end-of-the-year ritual ran as a 4-part series in the Houston Post "Today" section, December 16-19, 1975. Seemingly written under a beauty parlor hair dryer with a year's back issues of fan magazines for research, Campbell recounts Shirley Temple's daughter's marriage, Liz Taylor's remarriage, Ann Landers' divorce, and Ann Ford Uzielli's having- been-seen-with Governor Hugh Carey, a widowed father of 12. One full day of reporting was devoted to romance and the lovelorn. Other "headline makers" included "the hottest model of the year" — a "black girl with white features" and a deceased woman whose jewelry estate sale brought in over $2 million. Ironically, 1975 was the UN- proclaimed International Women's Year. We had the Mexico City Conference in June and in November, the US counter-part to Mexico City, the Austin Women in Public Life Conference, yet the only reference made to IWY was with regard to Australia giving up its female cyclone-naming practice in honor of the year-of-the-woman. The feminist movement? It was dispensed with in a sentence. "Women's lib (sic) wallowed in dissension and seemed to be running out of steam." A curious statement worthy of serious political analysis. This article was not the place. Yet Campbell did point out that two courses for women, "the opposite of women's lib (sic)", Fascinating Woman and the Total Woman were "packing in the students." In all this can anyone imagine a series called the "Men of '75" wherein Gerald Ford, Sirhan- Sirhan, Lt. Calley, Richard Burton, and Charles Manson were thrown together merely because their names appeared in the news, "for whatever reason"? Yet somehow we tolerate a melting pot with Betty Ford, Jackie Onassis, Liz Taylor, Lyn- ette Fromme, Sara Jane Moore, etal. All readers get from this kind of heat-and-serve convenience story is a strange-tasting liberation stew. Our suggestion is that Campbell's story be canned! JANICE BLUE ACLU The discrimination which women face in the area of credit has received much public attention during the last five years. Until recently, women simply could not get credit - either commercial, home loans, personal loans, or consumer - on the same basis as men. The situation is changing, due primarily to the passage of state and federal equal credit opportunity laws, and it is important for women to know and exercise their rights under these laws in order to force creditor compliance. Denial of equal access to credit deprives women of adequate housing, educational opportunities, and the ability to establish a livelihood by entering business, as well as the increased purchasing power of retail credit. It is the married or formerly married woman who appears to be the prime victim of sex discrimination in credit. When a woman marries she becomes an economic nonentity in the eyes of the credit establishment, and when she is subsequently divorced or widowed she emerges as an unknown in an increasingly credit-oriented society. The pervasive effect of sex- based credit discrimination has been extensively documented by women's action groups and governmental commissions. In hearings before Congress in 1973 and 1974 the following were among the discriminatory practices cited by the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing & Urban Affairs: 1. Single women have more trouble obtaining credit (particularly mortgages) than single men. 2. Creditors generally require a woman upon marriage to reapply for credit, usually in her husband's name. 3. Creditors are often unwilling to extend credit to a married woman in her own name. 4. Creditors are often unwilling to count the wife's income when a married couple applies for credit. 5. Women who are separated, divorced or widowed have trouble re-establishing credit. Women who are separated have a particularly difficult time since the accounts may still be in the husband's name. 6. Creditors refuse to issue to a working wife an account for which she would be eligible were she not married. 7. Creditors request information about her husband's creditworthiness before issuing an account to a working wife. 8. Creditors consider a working wife a "dependent" of her husband when determining his eligibility for credit. 9. Creditors apply stricter standards when the wife is the primary wage earner. 10. Creditors alter the credit rating of a working wife on the basis of her husband's credit performance. 11. Creditors refuse to consider alimony and child support as income for credit purposes when the reliability of the source may be verified. 12. Creditors request in- Workshop planned formation concerning birth control practices when evaluating a credit application. 13. Creditors use credit scoring systems that apply different numerical values depending on the sex or marital status of the applicant. An attempt to remedy the above discriminatory practices has been made on the state level, with the passage of laws prohibiting sex discrimination and marital status discrimination, and on the federal level, with the signing into law of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, effective last October. The Texas credit discrimination law, enacted in 1972, provides that: No licensee or those involved in credit transactions, may deny an individual credit or loans in his or her name, or restrict, or limit the credit or loan granted solely on the basis of sex. Few suits have been brought under this law, in part because it has been in existence only three years, but also because it prohibits discrimination only on the basis of sex, rather than on the basis of sex and marital status. Thus, practices such as refusing to count the income of both spouses when a couple applies for a mortgage and judging divorced and separated people more harshly because of assumptions about their stability would not be prohibited. continued on page 7 •Your group has decided to honor outstanding women in the community. You want to publicize the event. Where do you begin? •Your group is planning to protest the sale of a bumper sticker at a local novelty store which treats the CRIME of rape with humor. Whom do you call to cover the action? •You are offended by an ad running in the local newspaper showing a woman "and captioned, "I want your body and I want it now." Whom do you complain to? BREAKTHROUGH received calls on all of these questions while we were putting together the first issue of the paper. Since the philosophy of the paper is rooted in improving the communications between women in this community and state and between women and the media, we decided to hold a one-day workship for individual women and women's groups. It will take place Saturday, Jan. 31 in the Rice Media Center auditorium. Two sessions are planned. 9 AM ~ Noon-Is ■' Women's News" News? Coordinators: Janice Blue and Gay Cosgriff, Media Reform Task Force coordinators for West University and NW NOW, respectively. Panelists: Broadcasting news directors and assignment editors and representatives from newspaper news and feature departments. 1PM-4 PM-Are Those Ads that Bad? Coordinators: Aileen English, Assistant Prof, of Sociology, TSU, and Dr. Virginia Davidson, psychiatrist, Baylor College of Medicine. Panelists: Representatives from advertising agencies and broadcast and print advertisers. The goal of the morning session is to get better coverage of women's issues and events. We know we are newsworthy- how do we communicate it? There will be practical information. For example, how to write a press release and when to call a press conference. We will give specific examples to the news directors of events we have planned or that they have covered to see how coverage could have been improved. The goal of the afternoon session is how to improve the image of women in advertising. Slide presentations are planned on the image of women, one specifically dealing with the way ads portray women in medical journals. Discussion will include how to personally evaluate negative and positive ads and how to communicate your reaction to advertisers. We will have a press directory on hand with practical information containing the names of media contacts at every radio, tv, newspaper and advertising agency. Try to "communicate" with us if you plan to attend-by post card preferably or call Ailene English (641-1277) or Janice Blue (522-0020). Hope you join us! The Editors