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Breakthrough 1976-01
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Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 2. January 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1976). Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/288

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1976-01 - Page 2, January 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/303/show/288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Breakthrough 1976-01
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date January 1976
Description Vol. 1 No. 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 16 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_513b.jpg
Transcript Viva La Brecha! Houston's Linda Cryer Month" Some call Betty Friedan the "Mother of the U.S. feminist movement" because her book The Feminine Mystique, published in 1963, certainly did catch us all by surprise. And we know what happened since then. But how many of us had ever, to this day, heard of La Brecha, a book published in Chile in 1961. Mercedes Valdivieso, La Brecha s author, was a young married woman who could have gone on living a respectable life in the upper class of Santiago society. But she chose, instead, to write about her intense feelings of being a woman and her conflicts in a "married" relationship. It was her first book. Thousands were sold in less than a week. It was reprinted several more times and remained the number one best seller in Chile for over a year. Women stopped her on the street and described their lives "before and after La Brecha." Chile's leading literary critic called it a "revolutionary thunder- piece." It was too successful for some. An editorial, "Times of Morbidity", appeared in El Diario llu- strado (April 27, 1961). Never referring directly to her book by name (that would have further increased sales), it talked of writers who "to achieve sales . . . speak of violent intimacies, shameless in the worst sense. "And, significantly, women write them, women who previously had made no appearance in the literary world, who used to maintain a discreet and prescribed silence. But who now emerge to relate conjugal dramas, to speak of 'breakthroughs' and liberation . . ." Since the publication and impact of La Brecha, Valdivieso has lived in China and England, has written four more books, and now teaches Spanish Literature at Rice University. The English translation of La Brecha is Breakthrough. In homage to this important book and its impact on millions of women and in honor of its author, Mercedes Valdivieso, we named our feminist publication Breakthrough. A newspaper is born! Woman of the Mercedes Valdivieso, author of La Brecha, in front of a portrait by Spanish-born, Houston artist Pilar Cortella Rubin. Breakthrough Janice Blue, Writer-Editor Rhonda Boone, Writer-Editor Gay Cosgriff, Writer-Editor Cilia F. Estrada, Writer-Editor Rita Highsmith, Advertising Kathryn Hooker, Writer-Editor Charley Kubricht Fore, Art Juneau Shepherd, Writer-Editor Sue Witte, Writer-Editor, Circulation Breakthrough is published the first Tuesday of each month by Breakthrough Publishing Company, P.O. Box 8346 Houston, Texas 77004. Telephone 526-6686. Subscriptions $5.00 a year. Newsstand 50 cents per copy. All rights reserved. Linda Cryer By KATHRYN HOOKER If you were raped in Houston tomorrow and reported the crime to the Houston Police Department, the Department would pay for physicians' services and emergency-room treatment to be used as legal evidence. You could receive free counseling from city and county health department nurses. These advances are due in part to the work of Linda Cryer. Cryer, a feminist, became interested in helping rape victims through her work with the Houston Area Chapter of NOW. In 1974 she became head of that chapter's Reproduction and Control Task Force. When rape became a major concern of the task force, Cryer and others decided to form a separate group to concentrate solely on problems of rape. With other groups, they formed the Houston Rape Crisis Coalition, which provides advocates and telephone reassurance to assist victims in dealing with police, hospital personnel and the courts. Cryer's desire to implement change led her outside strictly feminist organizations. In July 1974 she was appointed by Mayor Hofheinz to expand or create programs for rape victims within existing medical, legal and public health agencies. She became Administrator of Hofheinz' Rape Treatment Detection and Prevention Program. Since her appointment, she has been involved in these projects: •H.B. 284, signed by Governor Briscoe- in May 1975, which extends the statute of limitations on prosecuting for rape to three years; redefines "consent" to exclude submission induced by nonverbal threats; encourages the reDOrtincr or»H nrncpriiHnn of rapes; and permits an incamera private hearing on the victim's previous sexual activity to determine if this is admissible as evidence •A City ordinance passed in March 1975 which implements a State law (H.B. 857), stating that any law-enforcement agency requesting a medical examination of a rape victim for use in investigation or prosecution shall pay all costs of the examination. We repeat: Report the crime to the Houston Police Department and they will pay for physicians' services and emergency room treatment to be used as evidence. Previously it cost the victim about $65 to be raped. Treatment for injuries resulting from the rape is not covered by the law. •Counseling services for female and male rape victims and their families which were made available last June. City and county nurses are cooperating to provide a minimum of three months counseling by telephone conversations and home visits to help the victim readjust. City Health Department nurses have already seen almost 200 victims. Victims are referred for counseling, at their request, from the hospital emergency room. •The University of Texas School of Nursing, through its Continuing Education Department, now offers a 45-hour educational course to train public health nurses in helping victims. •A "rape kit" now standardizes the collection, routing, and analysis of medical evidence to be used in prosecution. It will soon be available in most major medical facilities in Houston. In other areas of the country, a standard kit has been developed in one hospital, and victims must go only to this hospital. In Houston, the Police Department has assumed responsibility for the compilation and analysis of the contents. The kit may be picked up and delivered to any medical facility or private physician's office. The victim witnesses the opening and resealing of the kit. She then initials each evidence container and the outer kit envelope to lessen the need of having a physician attend courtroom proceedings. The Houston OB-Gyn Society has endorsed the kit. Cryer has held a seminar for school superintendents in seven counties on Houston's rape problem. She's planning another seminar in April for public school nurses to help them deal with rape on the school grounds. She hopes programs for rape prevention will be developed for schools and health department. She has begun to gather public support for the passage of legislation similar to that passed in Illinois. The law would establish additional hospital emergency services for rape victims. It would also prohibit accident and health-insurance polices from excluding coverage for treatment of rape injuries. Cryer has been offered technical help by the U.S. Law Enforcement Assistance Administration in developing a City-County project to provide information and other assistance to victims of ALL violent crimes. The program would involve local law- enforcement agencies, health departments, and the district attorney's office. . Cryer said her greatest challenge has been "to get law- enforcement agencies to recognize the emotional agonies of rape victims," One of her goals is to create awareness within all agencies dealing with rape victims of the victims' psychological wounds. "I'd like to see more hospital facilities for victims, improved crisis intervention services, and improved information services to victims while they are in court," she said. Our Woman of the Month has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Houston and an M.S.W. from Our Lady of the Lake University. She's a doctoral candidate at the University of Texas School of Public Health. Cryer suggests that victims call these numbers for help: City Nursing Division, 222-4271; County Nursing Division, 526- 1841; Crisis Hotline, 228-1505; Police Department, 222-3131; Linda Cryer, 222-4261; Houston Rape Crisis Coaliton, 524-5743. Linda Cryer, far left, at the signing of HB 284 by Governor Dolph Briscoe in May, 1975. Present are other state officials and statewide feminist leaders who strongly lobbied for the bill's passage.